Lunenburg

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DistrictLunenburg
Shared Contract District
Org Code1620000
Type of DistrictMunicipal K12
Union AffiliationMTA
Most Recent DocumentContract
Expiring Year2017
Expired Status
Superintendency Union
Regional HS Members
Vocational HS MembersMontachusett RVTSD
CountyWorcester
ESE RegionCentral
Urban
Kind of Communitysmall rural communities
Number of Schools4
Enrollment1702
Percent Low Income Students9
Grade StartPK or K
Grade End12
download pdf version of this document view accessible version of this document Lunenburg

Contract

between the

Lunenburg Education Association

and the

Lunenburg School Committee

July 1, 2014—June 30, 2017

ARTICLE I

PREAMBLE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 1781 of Chapter 149 and as amended by Chapter 763, Acts of 1965 of the General Laws of Massachusetts and Chapter 150E, Acts of 1973 of the General Laws, the SCHOOL COMMITTEE of the school system of LUNENBURG, MASSACHUSETTS (hereinafter sometimes referred to as the COMMITTEE), and the LUNENBURG EDUCATION ASSOCIATION (hereinafter sometimes referred to as the ASSOCIATION), hereby agree to a new three-year contract to be in effect from July 1, 2011 through June 30, 2014.

A.         Recognizing that our prime purpose is to provide education of the highest possible quality for the children of Lunenburg, and that good morale within the teaching staff of Lunenburg is essential to achievement of that purpose, we, the undersigned parties to this Contract, declare that:

1.         Under the laws of Massachusetts, the COMMITTEE, elected by the citizens of Lunenburg, has final responsibility for establishing the educational policies of the public schools of Lunenburg.

2.         The Superintendent of Schools of Lunenburg (hereinafter referred to as the SUPERINTENDENT) has responsibility for carrying out the policies so established.

3.         The teaching staff of the Public Schools of Lunenburg has the responsibility for providing for the schools education of the highest possible quality.

4.         Fulfillment of these respective responsibilities can be facilitated and supported by consultations and free exchange of views and information between the COMMITTEE and the SUPERINTENDENT, and the teaching staff in the formulation and application of policies relating to wages, hours, and other conditions of employment for the teaching staff; and so,

5.         To give effect to these declarations, the following principles and procedures are hereby adopted.

SCOPE

B.         For the purposes of collective bargaining pursuant to M.G.L. Chapter 150E, the Lunenburg School Committee (the "Committee") recognizes the Lunenburg Education Association (the "Association") as the exclusive collective bargaining representative of professional employees including the positions of: teacher, guidance  counselor,   school  psychologist,  occupational  therapist,   speech  and language pathologist, Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) and nurse, but excluding all administrators, members of other bargaining units, night school personnel, principals, substitutes, confidential, casual, managerial employees, and all other employees of the Lunenburg Public Schools.

C.         This Agreement shall be interpreted so as to be gender neutral in its application. Wherever the masculine gender is used, it shall also include the feminine, and wherever the feminine is used, it shall include the masculine.

ARTICLE II

GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE

1.         The purpose of this Article is to provide an orderly method for the settlement of grievances, which are disputes between the parties over a claimed violation of a specific provision of this Agreement. Grievances must be processed in accordance with the following steps, time limits, and conditions set forth in this article. Grievances should be treated confidentially to the extent appropriate under the circumstances.

2.         Grievances concerning suspensions may be brought under the procedure set forth in this Article. However, should an employee elect to pursue any statutory arbitration remedy, including arbitration pursuant to M.G.L.c.71, §42D, such arbitration shall be the exclusive remedy for the discipline at issue.

3.         All grievances filed at Steps 1 and 2 of the grievance procedure must be sufficiently specific to enable the District to understand the contractual basis of the grievance, the facts supporting it, the date of the occurrence(s), and the remedy sought.

4.         All days shall refer to calendar days unless otherwise specified.

5.         The Steps of the Grievance procedure shall be as follows:

INFORMAL STEP:

Employees may attempt to resolve their concerns informally with their immediate supervisors before invoking the formal grievance procedure. However, pursuit of an informal resolution will not extend any of the timelines set forth in the formal procedure.

STEP 1:

The employee or the association shall submit the grievance in writing to the Principal within 15 calendar days of the date that the employee or the Association knew or, reasonably should have known of the occurrence giving rise to the grievance. The Principal and the Association shall meet within 5 days of when the grievance was presented. The Principal shall respond in writing within 5 days of the hearing.

STEP 2:

If the grievance is not resolved in Step 1, the Association may appeal it by giving a written notice of such appeal to the Superintendent of Schools within 10 calendar days after the answer of the Principal is due. The Superintendent and the Association shall meet within 5 days to discuss the grievance. The Superintendent shall respond in writing within 5 days of the hearing.

STEP 3:

If the grievance is not settled in Step 2, the Association may request a hearing before the School Committee, by submitting a written request, which may include a written summary of the basis of the grievance, to the Superintendent within 10 calendar days of the date the Step 2 response is due. The Superintendent will present the request to the School Committee in executive session at the next available meeting and shall communicate the School Committee's decision to the Association in writing within 5 days of the decision. If the decision is a denial of the request, then the Superintendent's written notification of the denial to the Association shall serve as the District's Step 3 response for the purposes of this Article. The School Committee shall decline to hear personnel matters when it determines that the subject matter of the grievance falls outside of the Committee's jurisdiction. The School Committee shall notify the Association in writing of a decision not to hear the grievance. Should the School Committee agree to hear the grievance, the hearing will be held at or before the next available meeting after the meeting at which decision to hear the grievance is made. If the School Committee elects to have a subcommittee hear the grievance, then the hearing shall be scheduled at a time mutually agreeable to the parties. Thereafter, the Committee's written Step 3 response shall be due within 30 calendar days after the hearing.

STEP 4:         Arbitration

a.         If the dispute or grievance is not settled in the foregoing steps and it involves the claimed violation of an arbitrable provision of this Agreement, then the Association may seek arbitration by filing a written demand for arbitration with the American Arbitration Association. The demand shall be filed with the American Arbitration Association within 15 calendar days of the District's answer in Step 2, unless Step 3 review has been requested, in which case, the demand must be filed within 15 calendar days of the District's answer in Step 3.

b.         The arbitration proceeding will be conducted under the rules of the American Arbitration Association. The hearing locale shall be Lunenburg, MA, unless otherwise agreed by the parties. The arbitrator shall not have the authority to add to, subtract from, modify, change or alter any of the provisions of this Agreement. The award shall be final and binding on the School District, the Association, and the grievant. The decision of the arbitrator shall not violate any statutes of the Commonwealth, or regulations pursuant to such statutes.

c.         The arbitrator's decision shall be final and binding and may be reviewed in court under G.L. C. 150C, or on the grounds that the award: (1) is arbitrary or capricious, or (2) misinterprets or misapplies any provision of the law. The dispute, as stated in the request for arbitration, shall constitute the sole and entire subject matter to be heard by the arbitrator, unless the parties agree in writing to modify the scope of the hearing. A dispute that was not raised in the grievance may not be raised in arbitration. The arbitrator may not hear evidence or argument with respect to matters that are not arbitrable under this agreement.

6.         The parties agree to follow each of the foregoing steps in the processing of grievances; and if at any step the District fails to give its written answer within the time limit therein set forth, the grievance shall be deemed to be denied, and the Association may appeal the grievance to the next step at the expiration of such time limit. Failure of the Association at any step to process according to the time limits set forth herein shall mean that the Association has waived the grievance, and the right to proceed further.

7.         The Association may file a grievance affecting employees in two or more school buildings at Step 2, provided that it meets the time lines specified in Step 1.

ARTICLE III

LEAVE POLICY

A.         SICK LEAVE:

1.         For personal illness of the teacher, each teacher shall be entitled to twelve (12) sick leave days per year. Any of these, which are not used, can be accumulated to one hundred eighty (180) days without loss of pay.

2.         The superintendent, at his/her discretion, may require certification by a physician after five (5) consecutive days of sick leave.

3.         For illness of a member of the teacher's immediate family, which necessitates the teacher's absence from school, up to ten (10) days per school year may be charged to the teacher's personal sick leave. The immediate family is to be construed as spouse and children, spouse's children, mother, father, grandparent, grandchild, sister, brother, parent-in-law, or any other person who resides within the same household.

4.         Accumulation of sick leave will start with the beginning of the most recent period of continuous full-time employment at Lunenburg.

B.         DEATH IN THE FAMILY:

1.         For death in the immediate family of the teacher, an absence up to five (5) calendar days may be granted without loss of pay or other leave benefits.

2.         The immediate family is to be construed as husband, wife and children, mother, father, grandparent, grandchild, sister, brother, mother-in-law, father-in-law or any other person who lives within the same household.

3.         In the event of death of other close relatives, one (1) day may be granted.

C.         TEMPORARY LEAVES-OF-ABSENCE:

1.         Each employee is entitled to a maximum of three (3) personal days per year for the purpose of attending to personal or family business, which cannot be conducted outside of school hours. Requests for personal days must be made in writing to the principal at least 48 hours before the day of the proposed absence. The form on which requests for personal days are to be made is attached hereto and incorporated herein as if set forth in full as Appendix A to this Agreement.

2.         Personal days will not be granted generally during the first five (5) days of the school year, during the last five (5) days of the school year, or immediately preceding or following school vacation periods or holidays.

3.         If the employee wishes to use a personal day for personal illness or illness in the immediate family or emergency, the requirements for 48 hours notice will be waived.

D.         JURY DUTY

Employees will be granted leave to attend jury duty in accordance with applicable law.

E.         MILITARY LEAVE

Employees will be granted military leave in accordance with applicable state and federal laws.

F.         FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE:

Notwithstanding anything in this agreement to the contrary, any unit member may exercise his or her rights to take Family and Medical Leave or Military Family Leave pursuant to the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 ("FMLA"), as amended, or to take Small Necessities Leave pursuant to the Massachusetts Small Necessities Leave Act ("SNLA"). The FMLA is a federal law that provides for up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave each year for the birth, adoption or placement of a child; the serious health condition of the employee or an immediate family member; or to attend to certain qualifying exigencies connected with having a family member deployed to active military service. In addition, the FMLA allows unto 26 weeks of leave in a single 12-month period to care for covered military service members who become ill or injured in the line of duty while on active duty in the military. The SNLA is a state law that provides up to 24 hours per year of unpaid leave to attend to certain responsibilities regarding the educational advancement of the employees child, accompanying an employee's child to routine medical or dental appointments, or accompanying an elderly relative of the employee to routine medical or dental appointments, or appointments for other professional services related to the elder's care, such as interviewing at nursing or group homes. Although the statutory leaves are unpaid, employees with available qualifying paid leave benefits will receive paid leave. In the event that an employee qualifies for FMLA or SNLA leave, the District has the right to designate sick or other leave as FMLA or SNLA leave. The District shall have the right to establish rules and regulations concerning the use of Family and Medical Leave and Small Necessities Leave that are consistent with those laws and do not conflict with specific provisions of this agreement.

G.         ADDITIONAL LEAVE

Additional leave may be granted in the sole discretion of the Superintendent, and the grant or failure to grant such leave shall not be subject to grievance or arbitration.

ARTICLE IV

CONDITIONS

A.         THE CONTRACT YEAR

The teachers' contract covers the period starting as close to September 1st as administratively and educationally feasible, but not later than the day after Labor Day, and continues for one hundred eighty-two (182) working days with a one hundred eighty-third day only as necessary as determined by the Superintendent with suggestions provided by the L.E.A. This contract may not be invoked for more than one hundred eighty three 183 working days. (This is based on one hundred eighty (180) days of children being in school).

Annual teachers' salaries earned in the ten month period will be spread over a twelve-month period extending from September 1st through August 31st. A teacher employed during the year may be paid on a ten-month or twelve-month basis upon mutual agreement with the Superintendent of Schools; otherwise, salaries will be paid on a twelve-month basis.

* An exception to this article would be first year teachers whose contract year is   one hundred eighty-four (184) working days.

B.         LENGTH OF SCHOOL DAY:

A teacher's day (the "work day") will begin at least fifteen (15) minutes before the start time for students. At the end of the students' school day (the "school day"), and upon completion of all professional responsibilities (which may include but are not limited to: before and after school help for students, parent meetings, faculty meetings, professional development, programs, grade level meetings and subject meetings, etc.), teachers may leave at their discretion. With advance notice to teachers of at least twenty-four (24) hours, school principals may periodically rearrange the before school and after school requirements to accommodate before-school and/or after school faculty grade level, and subject area meetings and planning sessions. Attendance at normal faculty, mandatory professional development, and teacher orientation meetings will not be required in excess of forty (40) minutes beyond the normal work day, and shall not exceed an average of four (4) meetings per month unless mutually agreed upon by the administration and faculty.

C.         OPENING AND CLOSING TIMES OF SCHOOL DAY:

Opening and closing times of schools will be determined by the administration. The school day shall not exceed seven (7) hours and five (5) minutes.

D.         COMPENSATION AND OTHER CONDITIONS OF EMPLOYMENT:

Subject to the provisions of this Contract, the wages, hours, and other conditions of employment applicable on the effective day of the Contract shall continue to be applicable.

E.         SCHOOL CALENDAR:

1.         In the interest of facilitating a more flexible School Calendar, efforts will be made by the School Committee to start the school year as close to September 1st as administratively and educationally feasible.

2.         That the Lunenburg Education Association be consulted on changes in the Calendar but respecting the right of the School Committee to alter it, when emergencies arise.

F.         CLASSROOM PERIODS:

In the practice of good school administration, the school administrator will consult with faculty members affected before the number of scheduled periods or length of classroom periods within the normal school day are altered.

G.         STAFF DEVELOPMENT DAYS:

The School Committee will schedule five (5) staff development days per year.

The meetings will be scheduled between 7:00 am and 3:00 pm with consideration for after school activity schedules customary to the building and grade level.

The administration and the faculty will plan the agenda cooperatively.

ARTICLE V

SCHOOL EVENTS FOR PARENTS DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR

The parties agree the interests of Lunenburg parents, teachers, and students will be best served by providing opportunities for school events for parents during the school year.

A.         PARENT-TEACHER CONFERENCES

1         Principals may schedule parent-teacher conferences in a way that, in their judgment, best meets the needs of teachers, students, and parents. Conferences may be scheduled through a combination of early release time, and meeting time in the evening for a total of six hours.

2         Notwithstanding the foregoing, conferences will continue to be scheduled when necessary in individual cases when agreed upon by the parent and teacher, or required by the administration, based on a parent, teacher or administrator request. Such conferences will be held at mutually agreeable times.

B.         OTHER SCHOOL EVENTS FOR PARENTS

In addition to the above, the Principal may schedule one additional evening meeting for the purpose of a parent open house. Meetings for this purpose will not exceed two hours or extend beyond 9 p.m. unless extended at the discretion of the individual teachers.

ARTICLE VI

CLASS SIZE

The Committee and the Association recognize that Class Size is an important factor in good education, and the Committee will, subject to space availability and all other educational considerations, ensure that class size is conducive to an effective teaching/learning atmosphere. Special attention will be given to such areas as: basal groups, shop classes, and laboratory sections. However, the final decision on class size rests with the Committee.

ARTICLE VII

NOTIFICATION OF OPENINGS (Teaching Personnel)

A.         When there are vacancies within the District (defined as positions that the District desires to fill), including opportunities for advancement, stipend positions, new positions and replacement positions, the District will post those positions.

B.         Posting may be accomplished by posting the information in the central office, and in at least one location in each building and by sending an e-mail to all affected staff on their district e-mail accounts.

C.         Notices of vacancies will be posted for 7 calendar days, prior to the position being filled. If it is necessary to make a decision sooner than the posting period will allow, then the Superintendent may seek a waiver of the 7 days from the Association President.

D.         The NOTICE OF OPENING will include:

1.         A brief job description including the scope of the work and the  salary provisions.

2.         Date the work is to begin.

3.         Any other information deemed pertinent to a given position.

4.         Deadline date for receipt of applications.

E.         Notification over the summer shall be accomplished either by summer mailing, or by e-mail as described above. If summer mailing is utilized, notice of all positions will be accomplished by one summer mailing prior to August 15 to all employees who have provided a summer address to the district for this purpose prior to the conclusion of the last working day for teachers. If a vacancy occurs after August 15, then notice to employees shall be by e-mail or by newspaper advertisement.

ARTICLE VIII

TEACHER ASSIGNMENTS

A.         Teachers (other than newly appointed teachers) will be notified in writing of their programs for the coming school year, including the schools to which they will be assigned, the grades and/or subjects that they will teach, and any special or unusual classes that they will have, as soon as practicable and under normal circumstances not later than August 1st Wherever practicable, teachers will be given verbal tentative notice of such assignments by the close of the school year. If changes are made in teachers' programs after notification, they will be notified in writing as soon as possible, or no less than 2 weeks prior to implementation.

B.         In order to assure that pupils are taught by teachers working within their areas of competence, teachers will not normally be assigned, except temporarily or for good cause, outside the scope of their teaching certificates and/or their major or minor fields of study.

C.        Changes in grade assignment in the elementary schools and in subject assignment in the secondary schools will normally be voluntary. When involuntary transfers are necessary, a teacher's area of competence, major and/or minor field of study, quality of teaching performance, and length of service in the Lunenburg School System will be considered in determining which teacher is to be transferred. Teachers being involuntarily transferred will be transferred to comparable positions as far as is reasonably possible. The reassignment and utilization of teachers within a school building by the principal will not be considered a transfer. Teachers reassigned will be provided with at least 2 weeks notice, and an opportunity to meet with the principal if they so request.

D.         An involuntary transfer will be made by written notice to the affected teacher, stating the reasons for the transfer. The teacher shall be given an opportunity to meet with the Superintendent. In the event a teacher objects to the transfer, upon written request of the teacher, the Association will be notified in writing as to the specific reasons for the transfer and the Superintendent will meet with the Association representatives and the teacher involved to discuss the transfer.

E.         In arranging schedules for teachers who are assigned to more than one school, an effort will be made to limit the amount of inter-school travel. As such, teachers will be notified of any changes in their schedules as soon as practicable. Teachers will be reimbursed, upon request, at the IRS rate for mileage between buildings when required to travel to more than one building during the school day due to their assignments.

F.         Notwithstanding anything in this agreement to the contrary, the final decision on all assignments and transfers rests with the Superintendent of Schools.

G.         Teacher assignments will be made without regard to race, creed, color, religion, nationality, sex, sexual orientation, disability, age or marital status.

ARTICLE IX

NON-TEACHING DUTIES

The Committee and the Association acknowledge that a teacher's primary responsibility is to teach and that his energies should, to the extent reasonably practicable, be utilized to this end. The Committee has no present intention to make any substantial increase in the non-teaching duties that would affect a wide segment of teachers, and should circumstances change, would do so only after negotiation with the Association. On the other hand, the Committee recognizes that it may be desirable to relieve teachers of other non-teaching duties than now provided for in each building and, accordingly, will study additional methods and means designed to provide that in each building more of the teacher's time may be devoted to activities of direct benefit to students. Issues arising with respect to interpretation or application of the above, while they may be "grievances" under this Agreement, shall not be arbitrable.

ARTICLE X

TEACHING LOAD

A.         All teachers shall have a duty-free lunch period. At the elementary level all teachers will have at least a 20 minute lunch period.

B.         All classroom teachers and special service teachers shall have a duty-free preparation period each full work day. Intended largely for preparation, these periods shall be equal in time length to that of instructional periods in the workday provided each building. Academic subject area middle school and senior high school teachers (grades 6-12), will not normally be assigned more than five (5) instructional periods per work day and one (1) period some other duty. Modified block scheduling may be utilized at the high school, which will result in teachers teaching an extended period once every day.

While exceptions to the above may be made on either a temporary or regular basis, it is agreed that any such exception shall be rare.

C.         Classroom teachers in elementary grades 1-4 will be entitled to one twenty-five minute preparation period per day. Preparation time for pre-K and Kindergarten teachers will be provided between the morning and afternoon sessions for not less than twenty-five minutes.

D.         Special area teachers shall not normally be required to teach outside their area of specialization (i.e., music, art, physical education, industrial arts, and home economics).

ARTICLE XI

GROUP INSURANCE AND TAX-SHELTERED ANNUITIES

1.         All teachers covered by this Contract shall be eligible to participate in the present Group Insurance Plan in accordance with the provisions of said Plan in force and effect for employees of the Town of Lunenburg or in any comparable plan subsequently established to cover solely employees of the Town of Lunenburg the Committee and the Association will each designate two (2) persons to represent them on a study committee to report on the issue of "jointly managed trusts" as a vehicle for providing health insurance coverage to members of this bargaining unit. The report of this committee is not binding on either party, and the issue may be raised by either party in subsequent contract negotiations.

2.         Teachers shall be eligible to participate in a Tax-Sheltered Annuity Plan or a Tax-Sheltered Mutual Plan established pursuant to appropriate federal, state and local laws, by December 1st of each school year.

ARTICLE XII

VOLUNTARY TERMINATION OF EMPLOYMENT

Voluntary termination of employment from the Lunenburg School System will be by a written notice of at least thirty (30) days, except in the month of August and September, when a sixty (60) day notice is required.

ARTICLE XIII

SICK LEAVE BANK

A.         A Sick Leave Bank will be established for use by qualified members whose sick leave accumulation is exhausted through prolonged illness and who require additional leave to recover from an extended illness.

B.         Each member of the bargaining unit, school administrators, superintendent of schools, assistants, upon the accumulation of twenty (20) sick days at the end of a school year, become eligible for membership in the Sick Leave Bank. They then will contribute two (2) sick days initially and one (1) sick day each succeeding year until each member has contributed five (5) days.

In the event that the accumulation of bank days falls below three hundred fifty (350) days, members shall contribute additional days as deemed necessary by the Sick Leave Bank Committee.

C.         Any Sick Leave Bank days shall be carried over to successive years.

D.         The Sick Leave Bank shall be administered by a Sick Leave Bank Committee consisting of two (2) School Committee Designees and two (2) members of the Sick Leave Bank designated by the teachers' association. The Superintendent will serve as an ex-officio (non-voting) member of the committee.

E.         Application for benefits shall be made in writing to the Sick Leave Bank Committee prior to the point at which the employee's sick leave is exhausted as herein before provided, and shall be accompanied by a doctor's certificate as to the need for and anticipated extent of extended recovery time from the illness.

F.         A prolonged illness will be construed to be one, which causes the employee to be absent from work twenty (20) consecutive school days. Recurrence of an illness must be diagnosed by the doctor as being related and/or a continuation of the original illness. Under this provision, the twenty (20) prolonged illness days may be waived.

G.        If a member's sick days are exhausted because of a prolonged illness, any additional days needed for other illnesses will be considered on an individual basis provided a doctor has certified the need for such days.

H.         The initial grant of sick leave by the Sick Leave Bank Committee to an eligible employee shall not exceed thirty (30) days.

I.          Additional entitlement may be extended by the Sick Leave Bank Committee upon demonstration of need by the applicant.

J.         Subject to the foregoing requirements, the Sick Leave Bank Committee will determine the eligibility for the use of the Bank and the amount of leave to be granted. The following general criteria shall be considered by the Committee in administering the Bank and in determining the amount of leave:

(1)        Medical evidence of serious extended illness.

(2)        Prior utilization of eligible sick leave

(3)        Longevity

The decision of the Sick Leave Bank Committee with respect to eligibility and entitlement shall be final and binding and not subject to appeal.

K.         Upon return from extended sick leave during which benefits were received through the Sick Leave Bank, the recipient shall be entitled to commence a new accumulation of individual sick leave in accordance with the provisions of the collective bargaining agreement on the same basis as other teachers.

ARTICLE XIV

SABBATICAL LEAVE/ PROFESSIONAL LEAVE

A.         Upon the recommendation of the Superintendent of Schools, a Sabbatical Leave for a full or one-half school year may be granted by the School Committee for:

1.         Advanced study at an approved college or university; or

2.         For independent research to teachers who have completed seven (7) consecutive years of service in the Lunenburg School System, where such experience would, in the opinion of the Committee, increase the teacher's professional ability.

B.         Personnel requesting such leave must submit their applications, in writing, to the Superintendent of Schools not later than January 15th of the school year preceding the school year for which the leave is requested. Applications for sabbaticals must indicate the scope and area of the study of independent research to be undertaken as well as specifically indicating how such leave will benefit the Lunenburg School System. Action shall be taken on all such requests as soon as possible and not later than April 15th. A second or third such leave shall not be authorized until a teacher shall have re-established eligibility by serving another period of seven (7) years.

C.         No more than two (2) teachers involved with half year leaves or one teacher involved with a full year leave from the total school system will be absent on sabbatical leave during any one school year. No more than one teacher shall be absent at any one time.

D.         Successful applicants will receive one-half (1/2) of the salary to which they would have been entitled provided that that amount when coupled with any scholarship, grant, or aid, shall not exceed the regular salary to which they would have been entitled.

E.         Before accepting such sabbatical leave, the teacher shall enter into a written agreement to return to active service in the Lunenburg School Department for a period of at least twice the length of such leave. A teacher who does not fulfill this agreement shall have agreed in writing to pay the Town the amount of salary received for the sabbatical provided that the teacher may be released from such payment if his failure to serve twice the length of the leave is due to disability, death or if he is discharged from his position by the School Committee.

F.         A teacher returning from sabbatical leave shall be placed on the step of the salary schedule he would have attained had he remained in the school system. He shall not be entitled to sick leave or other benefits while on leave.

G.        A progress report should be submitted to the Superintendent by the recipient at the mid-point of the leave. Upon completion of the leave, the recipient shall submit a written report to the Superintendent containing transcripts of all college and university work done while on leave, together with any other pertinent or interpretive materials considered essential to an evaluation of his program.

H.        Recipients shall not engage in remunerative work unless approved in writing by the Superintendent while on leave except when scholarships and fellowships in approved colleges and universities which do not interfere with the prescribed program of professional improvements are allowed.

I.         In the case where there are several applications for the sabbatical leave, the Superintendent may appoint an evaluation committee, which would screen the applicants and report its findings to him. The recommendation of the Superintendent shall be made on the basis of the value of the proposed leave to the educational system of Lunenburg.

J.         (Professional Leave) - Upon the application of a member of the bargaining unit and the recommendation by the Superintendent, the School Committee or its designee may grant to such member of the bargaining unit, leave without pay for such term, upon such condition and for such purpose as the School Committee or its designee shall determine. The purpose for which a member of the bargaining unit shall submit his application for such unpaid leave may include, but shall not be limited to:

1.         Advanced study;

2.         Participation in an exchange-teaching program in another state, territory or country;

3.         Participation in a cultural program related to his professional responsibilities

4.         Participation in a public office to which he has been elected or appointed;

5.         Participation as MTA/NEA elected or appointed office and for such other purposes as may be allowed under the laws of the Commonwealth;

6.         Career exploration.

Any request for leave pursuant to paragraphs 2 and/or 3 above must be submitted on or before March 1st of the school year preceding the year in which the leave is to be taken. Requests for leave for advanced study must be submitted on or before April 1st of the school year preceding the year in which the leave is to be taken.

Any member of the bargaining unit granted an unpaid leave-of-absence shall retain those benefits accrued prior to the period of his leave which are permitted by statute and the policies of the School Committee; provided, however, that the period of any such leave shall not be included in the computation of seniority of any member of the bargaining unit, nor shall the taking of any such leave be deemed to affect any prior-accrued seniority.

Any request for leave pursuant to paragraphs 1, 2 and/or 3 above must be submitted at least one year in advance of the effective date.

ARTICLE XV

JOINT MEETINGS

The Lunenburg Education Association Executive Board and the Superintendent will meet monthly to discuss educational issues.

ARTICLE XVI

PAYROLL

A.         PAYROLL REGULATIONS:

1.         The Association and the Superintendent will consult annually prior to the close of school to establish the pay dates for the upcoming school year. The first full paycheck will be paid on the first Friday after the start of school on which the Town issues a payroll.

2.         In the event that a scheduled pay date falls on a holiday, or during a vacation period, the check will be mailed the Thursday preceding to the teacher's home.

3.         The Superintendent of School shall have the right to determine the salary schedule placement for newly hired employees without reference to actual experience, subject to the agreement of said employee, as a part of the hiring process. Full credit shall be given for degree status at the time of hire. Thereafter, such employee shall move through the steps based on experience, course work, and/or degree earned during their employment in the Lunenburg Public Schools as provided in this contract.

4.         In order to receive salary credit for degrees and/or course work, written notice must be given to the Superintendent of Schools not later than November 1 the school year prior to the school year in which salary credit for such degrees or course work is to be effective. (No changes of salary schedule placement will be made at the beginning of the school year and/or during a school year without prior notification as set forth above.)

5.         The employer may establish stipends for work to be performed outside of the contractual work year on a voluntary basis. The establishment of such stipends and/or the employment of persons to perform such work shall not be subject to collective bargaining and/or the grievance or arbitration provisions of this contract except as to an allegation that an employee was involuntarily required to perform such work.

B.         SUMMER PAYROLL:

1.         Teachers leaving the employ of the school system will receive their accumulated summer pay in a lump sum on or before June 30th.

2.         Teachers remaining in the school system may receive their accumulated summer pay in a lump sum if they have so requested, in writing, to the Superintendent of Schools by June 1st of each year. This also will be paid on or before June 30th.

C.        SALARY PRORATION:

1.         Salaries for teachers entering or leaving the school system during the school year will be figured at a daily rate of 1/183rd of the total annual salary. In the event that more than 185 days of school attendance for pupils are mandated by the State and more than 183 (184 days for first year teachers) working days are required of the teachers, additional salary will be paid on a proration of the annual salary at 1/183rd per diem.

2.         Deductions for days of absence over the allotted sick leave are made in accordance with the above procedure. Such deductions are adjusted in the July payroll period or upon termination of service during the school year.

3.         All extra-curricular and co-curricular activities, (including but not limited to Driver Education) established by the administration and approved by the School Committee shall be compensated pursuant to the after school activities schedule attached to and incorporated in this Agreement. Said compensation shall be treated in all respects as regular compensation, including, but not limited to being subject to deductions required by the Massachusetts Teachers Retirement System.

The administration, in its posting of such positions, shall set forth the maximum number of hours to be worked for each such position.

4.         Curriculum Development will be paid at a rate determined between the teacher and the Superintendent but not less than the pro-rated amount based on the current Bachelor minimum salary.

D.         PAYROLL WITHHOLDINGS:

1.         By law, deductions must be withheld for both federal and state income taxes.

2.         By law, deductions of 5% for service prior to January 1, 1975; 7% for service effective January 1, 1975; 8% for service effective January 1, 1984; and 11% for service effective September 2001 must be withheld from salary for teachers' retirement.

3.         Voluntary withholdings currently in practice are:

a.         Blue Cross-Blue Shield or Health Maintenance Organization premiums

b.         Payroll Savings

c.         Teachers' Association dues

d.         United Fund

e.         Tax Sheltered Annuities

f.         Accident and Health Insurance

g.         United States Savings Bonds

h.         Teachers will be allowed to participate in the Town of Lunenburg Section 125 Cafeteria Plan pursuant to the provisions of Section 125 of the Internal Revenue Code:

1)         Employee contributions to group health insurance will be made in pre-tax dollars;

2)         Employees may voluntarily participate in a Medical Care Account Plan (MEDCAP) and/or a Dependent Care Account Plan (DECAP) subject to all applicable laws and regulations; it is understood that MEDCAP and DECAP are funded   by   employee   contribution   in   toto,   and   that withdrawal from either during the plan year is prohibited under ordinary circumstances. All requirements and procedures set forth in the Summary Plan Description concerning benefits apply to MEDCAP and DECAP.

E.         DUES DEDUCTION

1.         The COMMITTEE hereby accepts the provisions of Section 17C of Chapter 180 of the General Laws of Massachusetts and, in accordance therewith, shall certify to the Treasurer of Lunenburg, all payroll deductions for the payment of dues to the ASSOCIATION duly authorized by employees covered by this Contract.

2.         Agency Service Fee.

Commencing on the effective date of this Agreement, all employees who are members of the bargaining unit as of the ratification date of this Agreement and all new employees hired after said date shall be required as a condition of their employment to pay an agency service fee unless they become members of the Association within thirty (30) days. Said fee shall be in an amount and shall be implemented in accordance with all applicable state and federal laws and regulations. The collection of the fee shall be solely the responsibility of the Association, and the School Committee shall not be responsible for the implementation, collection or enforcement of the fee, except that it will supply any required documentation to establish that a person refusing to pay the fee is a member of the bargaining unit. The sole remedy available to the Association to enforce payment of the fee shall be to proceed to court for collection of the fee. The Committee will grant one (1) representative of the Association such leave as is reasonable necessary for court appearances in connection with enforcement of this provision. In the event that the Committee is made a party to any litigation involving this provision, the Association agrees to hold the Committee harmless and indemnify it in full for any judgments, which are entered against the Committee, provided that the Committee will agree to utilize the services of an attorney chosen by the Association.

ARTICLE XVII

CRITERIA GOVERNING ADVANCEMENT BETWEEN DEGREE

SCHEDULES AND PROFESSIONAL IMPROVEMENT

A.         Courses must be taken from accredited institutions of higher education. Courses are to be subject content oriented in the teacher's field or be prerequisites for an approved graduate degree program or deemed beneficial to the applicant in his particular Lunenburg assignment. On-line continuing education course credit can account for no more than 60% of the required number of credits for column advancement.

B.         Approval of a given course on the prescribed form must be received from the Superintendent of Schools prior to taking the course if it is to receive credit for salary purposes.

C.         All courses, whether in-service or otherwise a offered by degree granting institutions will be acceptable if the provisions of "A" and "B" above are met.

D.         CRITERIA FOR REIMBURSEMENT

1.         The Committee will pay the reasonable expenses (including fees, meals, lodging and/or transportation) incurred by teachers who attend workshops, seminars, conferences or other professional improvement sessions at the request of the School Administration and with the advance approval of the Superintendent of Schools.

2.         Teachers must present receipted bill for payment.

E.         Professional development activities shall be coordinated through the Professional Development Committee, subject to the approval of the Director of Professional Development and Superintendent of Schools.

ARTICLE XVIII

REDUCTION IN FORCE

A.         In the event of any reduction in the force of employees with professional teacher status, system-wide seniority within academic disciplines, as defined below will be the criterion used to select those to be laid off, except where the Superintendent determines that substantial performance variations, the presence or absence of special experience or training, or other substantial educational considerations exist, in which case the Superintendent shall determine which employee shall be laid off.

B.         Academic disciplines are:

1.         Biology

2.         Business

3.         Chemistry

4.         Early Childhood

5.         Earth Science

6.         Elementary

7.         English

8.         Foreign Language

9.         General Science

10.       Health

11.       History

12.       Instructional Technology

13.       Latin

14.       Library

15.       Mathematics

16.       Middle School

17.       Music

18.       Physical Education

19.       Physics

20.       Reading

21.       School Guidance Counselor

22.       School Nurse

23.       School Psychologist

24.       School Social Worker/School Adjustment Counselor

25.       Specialist in Speech, Language, and Hearing Disorders

26.       Teacher of Students with Moderate Disabilities

27.       Teacher of Students with Severe Disabilities

28.       Teacher of the Visually Impaired

29.       Technology/Engineering

30.       Visual Art

C.         Seniority shall be defined as continuous unbroken service in a professional educational position in Lunenburg (either in or out of the bargaining unit) from the date of appointment to any such position and including the time spent on leave-of-absence whether paid or unpaid, up to and including two total years.

In the event two (2) or more persons are tied, the tie breaker, in order shall be:

1.         Degree Status;

2.         More years of total teaching experience;

3.         Lottery.

Annually, but no later than October 15th, the parties will have either agreed upon a seniority list or identified the persons with respect to whom there is disagreement. Any such disagreements will be resolved in one arbitration pursuant to the Expedited Arbitration Rules of the American Arbitration Association.

D.         Laid off employees with professional teaching status will retain recall rights for a period of two (2) years from the effective date of their layoff. (August 31 is the effective date of a layoff for an employee scheduled for layoff status the next school year.)

In the event a vacancy occurs in a position for which an employee with recall rights is then currently qualified pursuant to the provisions of G.L. c. 71S. 38G will be offered that position. In the event there are two or more employees who are so qualified, the criteria for selection between them will be applied as set forth in section 1. above. Such employee(s) shall be notified of the opening by certified mail to the then last address of record, and the employee shall have ten (10) calendar days from the date of mailing to notify the Superintendent in writing of his/her acceptance of the position. Failure to so notify terminates all rights under this recall provision.

Recalled employees shall be restored all benefits and seniority, but they shall not accumulate benefits or seniority while on recall status.

Laid off employees may continue group health and life insurance during the recall period as permitted under applicable law by reimbursing the town the total premium cost. Failure to forward premium payments to the town during the period of layoff or refusal to return to employment upon recall will terminate all rights under this Article.

ARTICLE XIX

Previously Deleted Article

ARTICLE XX

SALARIES

A.         SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST AND GUIDANCE  COUNSELORS   SALARY DIFFERENTIALS

1.         A $400.00 differential was adopted for the Lunenburg Public Schools Psychologist

2.         A $200.00 differential was adopted for Guidance Counselors.

B.         GUIDANCE      PERSONNEL       -       SPECIAL      NEEDS       PERSONNEL REMUNERATION BEYOND TEACHERS' NORMAL SCHOOL YEAR.

In the event it is felt to be necessary for Guidance and Special Needs personnel to work beyond the number of days required of all other teaching staff, they will receive additional remuneration on a prorated per diem basis at the rate of 1/185th of their annual base salary. This additional time will be subject to the prior approval of the Superintendent of Schools.

C.         DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS SALARY DIFFERENTIAL

1.         Criteria established:

a.         The annual salary differential of the Director of Athletics will be at least $400.00 more than the differential paid to the highest coaching position on the Coaches Salary Schedule.

b.         When this present position becomes vacant, a person other than a physical education major may be appointed as Athletic Director.

D.         CRITERIA GOVERNING COACHES SALARY

New coaches will come into the assignment at the Step 1 rate; however, the Committee reserves the right to place a new coach on another step on the basis of previous experience in a comparable assignment in other school systems.

The salaries for Coaches are set forth in the salary schedules attached hereto and incorporated in this Agreement.

E.         During the self-evaluation and visitation year of the NEASC accreditation process, salaries will be provided to those serving in the following capacities as follows: Committee Chair, $1,000; Standards Chairs, $600; Cleric/Editor, $600.

F.         Salaries for after school activities, extracurricular activities and department heads and other co-curricular work are contained in this contract.

G.         PROGRAMS FOR SENIOR TEACHERS

1.         Bargaining unit members with fifteen (15) years of service for the Lunenburg Public Schools may make a one-time election, subject to the other provisions of this Article, between the following two options:

(a)         Longevity payments of $5,000 per year for three (3) consecutive ' years, for a maximum total payout of $15,000. If necessary, payments will continue after termination of employment, or until the participating unit member has received the total $15,000 payout.

(b)         A $5000 per year stipend to be paid while the teacher remains employed by the District as a Master Teacher. The Master Teacher option only shall be available to bargaining unit members with twelve (12) or more years of service for the District. Once elected, option (a) shall not be available to teachers taking this option.

2.         Master Teachers may serve as mentors or curriculum task force members as this step is proposed to recognize the value and experience our senior teachers bring to the school department. Participants are required to spend no more than 100 hours in performance of the duties as agreed to by both the Superintendent and the Master Teacher in writing.

3.         Eligible teachers who desire to enter one of the two programs must apply in writing to the Superintendent no later than December 15 of the year preceding the year in which the member wishes to begin receiving the payment.

4.         The maximum annual payout by the District under these two programs shall not exceed a combined total of $120,000. Within that total, the maximum annual payout by the District under the provisions of paragraph 1(a) above shall not exceed $40,000. Accordingly, new applicants may be admitted into one of these programs only to the extent that the cost of new successful applicants combined with incumbent participants, do not exceed the maximums described in this paragraph. In the event that the cost of new applicants giving such notice, combined with incumbent participants, would result in Lunenburg Public Schools total payments exceeding these maximum amounts in any school year the following will apply:

(a)        Applicants will be asked to volunteer to withdraw or defer their applications to a future year. Applicants will have five (5) school days to respond to this request.

(b)       In the event costs still exceed the maximums in any school year after volunteers have been sought, seniority as defined in this Agreement will be the sole factor used to determine which successful applicants will be allowed to enter and begin to receive benefits. Should a tie exist, a lottery will be conducted with the affected Unit A members or their Association representative present, to determine who is eligible.

5.         Master teachers from a previous year are presumptively eligible to continue in that status, provided they have satisfactorily performed their Master Teacher responsibilities, in the opinion of the Superintendent. Should the Superintendent determine that a Master Teacher has not fulfilled his or her responsibility, then the Master Teacher status will end. To the extent the teacher has not received $15,000 from the program, the teacher may switch to the first option until he or she has been paid Longevity payments totaling $15,000, including any previously paid Master Teacher stipends.

6.         Once a teacher has elected one option or the other, the Teacher may not subsequently elect the other option, except in the circumstance described above, where the Superintendent removes the Master Teacher designation. In all other cases, the exercise of the election, once approved by the Superintendent pursuant to this Article, shall be final.

H.        LONGEVITY

Members of Unit A that have completed a minimum of 30 years of continuous service to the Lunenburg Public Schools shall receive a longevity increase. This longevity payment will be added to the base salary and paid regularly in all payroll checks. Beginning in the 2004-2005 school year the longevity will be .5% and in 2005-2006 the rate shall be 1%.

I.         NURSING COORDINATOR

The nursing coordinator position will be posted and appointed annually by the District. The nursing coordinator will perform duties as assigned by the superintendent.

ARTICLE XXI

COURSE AND CONFERENCE REIMBURSEMENT

A.         COURSE REIMBURSEMENT

The reimbursement total paid to all bargaining unit members in any fiscal year under this provision shall not exceed thirty thousand dollars ($30,000.00). The fiscal year will be divided into two reimbursement periods with the total split into equal pools of fifteen thousand dollars $15,000. Courses taken from July to December will be eligible for reimbursement in January (last pay of the month). Courses taken from January to June will be eligible for reimbursement in September (last pay of the month). Any remaining money in the pool following the first round of reimbursements will be carried over to the second reimbursement period. In the event funds still remain following the second round of payments, they will be made available to Bargaining Unit Members for additional course reimbursements. In the event requests exceed available pool funds, reimbursements will be apportioned to staff as equally as possible.

In-house courses offered at reduced costs of $225.00 or less are not eligible for reimbursement; however, these courses will continue to be counted toward degree status advancement. Individuals may elect to receive a Lunenburg credit for these courses which can be applied to degree status advancement solely in Lunenburg.

Each Bargaining Unit Member will be eligible to receive reimbursement for tuition and fees for courses completed with a passing grade of B or better at an accredited four year college and/or university up to a maximum of seven hundred fifty dollars ($750.00) per course, subject to the following conditions:

1.         All courses must be approved in advance by the Superintendent of Schools or his/her designee and must support the teacher's primary teaching responsibility in Lunenburg.

2.         A final grade report along with payment verification must be submitted to the Superintendent's office not later than December 30th of the current fiscal year to be eligible for the first round of reimbursements and not later than July 30th for the second round of reimbursements.

3.         To qualify for reimbursement, Bargaining Unit Members must continue to be actively employed in the Lunenburg Public Schools during the school year following the completion of said courses. Should a bargaining unit member fail to return to the employ of the Lunenburg Public Schools full reimbursement of all funds awarded to that member must be made within thirty (30) days of the termination date.

B.         CONFERENCE REIMBURSEMENT

The reimbursement total paid to all bargaining unit members in any fiscal year under this provision shall not exceed sixteen thousand dollars ($16,000.00). This pool will support both conference and substitute costs. The fiscal year will be divided into two reimbursement periods with the total split into equal pools of eight thousand dollars ($8,000). All substitute fees for individuals attending conferences are to be paid from this pool. Conferences attended from July to December will be eligible for reimbursement in January (last pay of the month). Conferences attended from January to June will be eligible for reimbursement in September (last pay of the month). Any remaining money in the pool following the first round of reimbursements will be carried over to the second reimbursement period. In the event funds still remain following the second round of payments, they will be made available to Bargaining Unit Members for additional conference reimbursements.

Each Bargaining Unit Member will be eligible to receive reimbursement up to a maximum of two hundred dollars ($200.00) per conference, subject to the following conditions:

1.         All conferences must be approved in advance by the Superintendent of Schools or his/her designee and must support the teacher's primary teaching responsibility in Lunenburg.

2.         Payment verification must be submitted to the Superintendent's office not later than December 30 of the current fiscal year to be eligible for the first round of reimbursements and not later than July 30 for the second round of reimbursements.

3.         Employees may also submit for approval, subject to the same conditions and limitations provided in this section for conferences, requests for reimbursement of dues paid by the employee for membership in content area professional organizations and societies.

ARTICLE XXII

EVALUATION

The procedures, rubrics and district determined measures relating to evaluation of bargaining unit members are set forth in Appendix C, D, E and Appendix F to this Agreement.

ARTICLE XXIII

MANAGEMENT RIGHTS

The Association affirms that the Committee is a public body established under and with powers provided by the statutes of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and nothing in this agreement shall be deemed to derogate from, or impair, any power, right, or duty conferred upon the Committee by statute or any rule or regulation of any agency of the Commonwealth. As to every matter not specifically mentioned or not provided for in this agreement, the Committee retains all powers, rights and duties that it has by law and may exercise the same at its discretion, without any such exercise being made the subject of a grievance or arbitration proceeding hereunder.

ARTICLE XXIV DURATION

A.         This Contract shall continue in effect to and including June 30, 2017 and shall thereafter automatically renew itself for successive terms of one year each unless by the November 1 st next prior to the year of expiration, either the Committee or the Association shall have given the other written notice of its desire to modify or terminate this Contract.

B.         As to every matter not specifically mentioned or provided for in this Agreement, the COMMITTEE has the powers and duties conferred upon it by law and may act upon the same without being subject to arbitration under this agreement provided, however, this article shall not be construed to mean that any employee who may be aggrieved by the exercise of any such power by the COMMITTEE shall be prevented from protesting and taking up such matter with any superior, including the SCHOOL COMMITTEE, with a view towards securing a modification or revocation of the action protested, further provided, however, that any decision thereafter made by the SCHOOL COMMITTEE which does not involve the interpretation or application of the agreement with respect to such matter shall be final.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties to this CONTRACT have caused these present to be executed by their agents hereunto duly authorized, and their seal to be affixed hereto, as of the date first above written:

Signatures on file at the Office of the Superintendent

LUNENBURG EDUCATION                                                     LUNENBURG SCHOOL COMMITTEE:

ASSOCIATION

___________________________________                                __________________________________

President                                                                                       Chairperson

___________________________________                                __________________________________

Contract Manager                                                                         Vice-Chairperson

___________________________________                                __________________________________

Secretary                                                                                       Secretary

___________________________________                                __________________________________

Treasurer                                                                                       Member

                                                                                                      ___________________________________

Date signed: _______________                                                   Member

                                                                                                                  Date signed: ______________

Appendix A

LUNENBURG PUBLIC SCHOOLS

PERSONAL LEAVE REQUEST

Name:            _________________________________________________________________________

School:           _________________________________________________________________________

Date Request Received by Principal1 :  _____________________________________________________

Date(s) of Requested Leave2 :   ___________________________________________________________

I am requesting personal leave on the above date(s) for the purpose of attending to personal or family business, which cannot be conducted outside of school hours3

______________________________________________

Employee Signature

The above leave is approved as having been requested in accordance with the terms of the Collective Bargaining Agreement in effect between the Lunenburg Education Association.

______________________________________________

Principal's Signature

_____________________________________________________________________________________

1 Requests for personal days must be received in writing at least 48 hours in advance of the date the leave is to be taken. If the employee wishes to use a personal day for personal illness or illness in the immediate family or emergency, the requirements for 48 hours notice will be waived

2 Personal days will not be granted generally during the first five days of the school year, during the last five days of the school year, or immediately preceding or following school vacation periods or holidays.

3 An employee may not be required to provide a more detailed statement of reasons when requesting personal leave.

Appendix B

Salary Schedules

2014-2015

Step

Bachelor

B+15

B+30

Masters

M+15

0

 

 

 

 

 

1

43,347

45,572

47,797

50,023

52,247

2

45,200

47,426

49,650

51,875

54,100

3

47,055

49,278

51,505

53,730

55,953

4

48,911

51,136

53,358

55,582

57,806

5

50,762

52,988

55,212

57,436

59,661

6

52,618

54,842

57,067

59,292

61,514

7

54,471

56,696

58,919

61,145

63,371

8

56,324

58,549

60,774

62,997

65,223

9

58,178

60,402

62,626

64,853

67,077

10

60,031

62,256

64,481

66,706

68,931

11

61,885

64,111

66,335

68,559

70,786

12

65,455

67,681

69,905

72,129

74,356

 

Step

M+30

M+45

M+60

M+75

Doctorate

0

 

 

 

 

 

1

54,471

56,696

58,919

61,145

63,371

2

56,324

58,549

60,774

62,872

65,223

3

58,178

60,402

62,626

64,853

67,077

4

60,031

62,256

64,481

66,706

68,931

5

61,885

64,111

66,335

68,559

70,786

6

63,739

65,966

68,189

70,413

72,638

7

65,592

67,818

70,042

72,266

74,491

8

67.448

69,670

71,897

74,121

76,345

9

69,303

71,526

73,750

75,976

78,199

10

71,154

73,380

75,604

77,827

80,054

11

73,009

75,232

77,459

79,682

81,906

12

76,579

78,802

81,029

83,252

85,476

2015-2016

Step

Bachelor

B+15

B+30

Masters

M+15

0

 

 

 

 

 

1

44,214

46,483

48,753

51,023

53,292

2

46,104

48,374

50,643

52,913

55,182

3

47,996

50,264

52,535

54,804

57,072

4

49,889

52,158

54,425

56,693

58,963

5

51,778

54,048

56,316

58,585

60,854

6

53,670

55,939

58,208

60,477

62,744

7

55,560

57,830

60,098

62,368

64,638

8

57,451

59,720

61,989

64,257

66,527

9

59,341

61,610

63,878

66.150

68,419

10

61,232

63,501

65,771

68,040

70,309

11

63,123

65.393

67,661

69,930

72,202

12

66,765

69,035

71,303

73,572

75,843

 

Step

M+30

M+45

M+60

M+75

Doctorate

0

 

 

 

 

 

1

55,560

57,830

60,098

62,368

64,638

2

57,451

59,720

61,989

64,129

66,527

3

59,341

61,610

63,878

66,150

68,419

4

61,232

63,501

65,771

68,040

70,309

5

63,123

65,393

67,661

69,930

72,202

6

65,014

67,286

69,553

71,821

74,091

7

66,904

69,174

71,443

73,711

75,980

8

68,796

71,063

73,335

75,604

77,872

9

70,689

72,957

75,225

77,495

79,763

10

72,577

74,847

77,117

79,384

81,655

11

74,469

76,737

79,008

81,276

83,544

12

78,110

80,378

82,649

84,917

87,186

2016-2017

Step

Bachelor

B+15

B+30

Masters

M+15

0

 

 

 

 

 

1

45,098

47,413

49,728

52,044

54,358

2

47,026

49,342

51,655

53,971

56,285

3

48,956

51,269

53,586

55,900

58,214

4

50,887

53,202

55,514

57,827

60,142

5

52,813

55,129

57,442

59,757

62,071

6

54,743

57,058

59,372

61,687

63,999

7

56,672

58,986

61,300

63,615

65,931

8

58,600

60,914

63,229

65,542

67,858

9

60,528

62,843

65,156

67,473

69,787

10

62,456

64,771

67,086

69,401

71,715

11

64,386

66,701

69,015

71,329

73,646

12

68,100

70,415

72,729

75,043

77,360

 

Step

M+30

M+45

M+60

M+75

Doctorate

0

 

 

 

 

 

1

56,672

58,986

61,300

63,615

65,931

2

58,600

60,914

63,229

65,412

67,858

3

60,528

62,843

65,156

67,473

69,787

4

62,456

64,771

67,086

69,401

71,715

5

64,386

66,701

69,015

71,329

73,646

6

66,314

68,632

70,944

73,257

75,573

7

68,242

70,558

72,872

75,186

77,500

8

70,172

72,485

74,801

77,116

79.429

9

72,103

74,416

76,730

79,045

81,359

10

74,029

76,344

78,659

80,971

83,288

11

75,958

78,272

80,588

82,902

85,215

12

79,672

81,986

84,302

86,616

88,929

Athletic Salary Schedule Stipends

FY15 (2014-2015)

 

STEP 1

STEP 2

STEP 3

STEP 4

STEP 5

Athletic Director

 

 

$5,356

$6,076

$6,980

Football (Head Coach)

$3,874

$4,325

$4,781

$5,212

$5,761

Football (Assistant)

$1,914

$2,205

$2,481

$2,911

$3,392

Freshman Football

$1,329

$1,505

$1,679

$2,112

$2,567

Field Hockey (Varsity)

$2,297

$2,659

$3,040

$3,473

$3,968

Field Hockey (Jr. Varsity)

$1,505

$1,679

$1,852

$2,285

$2,746

Soccer (Varsity)

$2,297

$2,659

$3,040

$3,473

$3,968

Soccer (Jr. Varsity)

$1,505

$1,679

$1,852

$2,285

$2,746

Cross Country

$1,505

$1,679

$1,852

$2,285

$2,746

Basketball (Varsity)

$2,681

$3,129

$3,581

$4,014

$4,527

Basketball (Jr. Varsity)

$1,891

$2,117

$2,343

$2,776

$3,250

Basketball (Freshman)

$1,329

$1,505

$1,679

$2,112

$2,567

Hockey (Varsity)

$2,681

$3,129

$3,581

$4,014

$4,527

Hockey (Jr. Varsity)

$1,891

$2,117

$2,343

$2,776

$3,250

Baseball (Varsity)

$2,297

$2,659

$3,040

$3,473

$3,968

Baseball (Jr. Varsity)

$1,505

$1,679

$1,852

$2,285

$2,746

Softball (Varsity)

$2,297

$2,659

$3,040

$3,473

$3,968

Softball (Jr. Varsity)

$1,505

$1,679

$1,852

$2,285

$2,746

Winter Indoor Track (Varsity)

$2,297

$2,659

$3,040

$3,473

$3,968

Winter Indoor Track (Assistant)

$1,329

$1,505

$1,679

$2,112

$2,567

Spring Track (Varsity)

$2,297

$2,659

$3,040

$3,473

$3,968

Spring Track (Assistant)

$1,505

$1,679

$1,852

$2,285

$2,746

Winter Weight

$1,329

$1,505

$1,679

$2,112

$2,567

Summer Weight

$1,329

$1,505

$1,679

$2,112

$2,567

Golf

$1,505

$1,679

$1,852

$2,246

$2,706

Tennis

$1,505

$1,679

$1,852

$2,246

$2,706

Fall Cheerleading

$1,329

$1,505

$1,679

$2,112

$2,567

Winter Cheerleading

$1,329

$1,505

$1,679

$2,112

$2,567

THMS Head Football Coach

$1,329

$1,505

$1,679

$2,112

$2,566

THMS Asst. Football Coach

$1,110

$1,285

$1,460

$1,893

$2,346

THMS Field Hockey Coach

$1,329

$1,505

$1,679

$2,112

$2,566

THMS Cheerleading Coach

$665

$753

$838

$1,056

$1,284

THMS Basketball Coach

$1,329

$1,505

$1,679

$2,112

$2,566

FY16 (2015-2016)

 

STEP 1

STEP 2

STEP 3

STEP 4

STEP 5

Athletic Director

 

 

$5,463

$6,198

$7,119

Football (Head Coach)

$3,951

$4,411

$4,876

$5,316

$5,876

Football (Assistant)

$1,952

$2,249

$2,530

$2,969

$3,459

Freshman Football

$1,356

$1,535

$1,712

$2,155

$2,619

Field Hockey (Varsity)

$2,343

$2,712

$3,100

$3,543

$4,047

Field Hockey (Jr. Varsity)

$1,535

$1,712

$1,889

$2,330

$2,801

Soccer (Varsity)

$2,343

$2,712

$3,100

$3,543

$4,047

Soccer (Jr. Varsity)

$1,535

$1,712

$1,889

$2,330

$2,801

Cross Country

$1,535

$1,712

$1,889

$2,330

$2,801

Basketball (Varsity)

$2,734

$3,192

$3,653

$4,094

$4,617

Basketball (Jr. Varsity)

$1,929

$2,159

$2,390

$2,832

$3,315

Basketball (Freshman)

$1,356

$1,535

$1,712

$2,155

$2,619

Hockey (Varsity)

$2,734

$3,192

$3,653

$4,094

$4,617

Hockey (Jr. Varsity)

$1,929

$2,159

$2,390

$2,832

$3,315

Baseball (Varsity)

$2,343

$2,712

$3,100

$3,543

$4,047

Baseball (Jr. Varsity)

$1,535

$1,712

$1,889

$2,330

$2,801

Softball (Varsity)

$2,343

$2,712

$3,100

$3,543

$4,047

Softball (Jr. Varsity)

$1,535

$1,712

$1,889

$2,330

$2,801

Winter Indoor Track (Varsity)

$2,343

$2,712

$3,100

$3,543

$4,047

Winter Indoor Track (Assistant)

$1,356

$1,535

$1,712

$2,155

$2,619

Spring Track (Varsity)

$2,343

$2,712

$3,100

$3,543

$4,047

Spring Track (Assistant)

$1,535

$1,712

$1,889

$2,330

$2,801

Winter Weight

$1,356

$1,535

$1,712

$2,155

$2,619

Summer Weight

$1,356

$1,535

$1,712

$2,155

$2,619

Golf

$1,535

$1,712

$1,889

$2,291

$2,760

Tennis

$1,535

$1,712

$1,889

$2,291

$2,760

Fall Cheerleading

$1,356

$1,535

$1,712

$2,155

$2,619

Winter Cheerleading

$1,356

$1,535

$1,712

$2,155

$2,619

THMS Head Football Coach

$1,356

$1,535

$1,712

$2,155

$2,618

THMS Asst Football Coach

$1,132

$1,311

$1,489

$1,931

$2,393

THMS Field Hockey Coach

$1,356

$1,535

$1,712

$2,155

$2,618

THMS Cheerleading Coach

$678

$768

$855

$1,077

$1,310

THMS Basketball Coach

$1,356

$1,535

$1,712

$2,155

$2,618

FY17 (2016-2017)

 

STEP 1

STEP 2

STEP 3

STEP 4

STEP 5

Athletic Director

 

 

$5,572

$6,322

$7,262

Football (Head Coach)

$4,030

$4,500

$4,974

$5,423

$5,994

Football (Assistant)

$1,991

$2,294

$2,581

$3,029

$3,529

Freshman Football

$1,383

$1,565

$1,747

$2,198

$2,671

Field Hockey (Varsity)

$2,390

$2,767

$3,162

$3,613

$4,128

Field Hockey (Jr. Varsity)

$1,565

$1,747

$1,927

$2,377

$2,857

Soccer (Varsity)

$2,390

$2,767

$3,162

$3,613

$4,128

Soccer (Jr. Varsity)

$1,565

$1,747

$1,927

$2,377

$2,857

Cross Country

$1,565

$1,747

$1,927

$2,377

$2,857

Basketball (Varsity)

$2,789

$3,256

$3,726

$4,176

$4,710

Basketball (Jr. Varsity)

$1,967

$2,202

$2,438

$2,889

$3,381

Basketball (Freshman)

$1,383

$1,565

$1,747

$2,198

$2,671

Hockey (Varsity)

$2,789

$3,256

$3,726

$4,176

$4,710

Hockey (Jr. Varsity)

$1,967

$2,202

$2,438

$2,889

$3,381

Baseball (Varsity)

$2,390

$2,767

$3,162

$3,613

$4,128

Baseball (Jr. Varsity)

$1,565

$1,747

$1,927

$2,377

$2,857

Softball (Varsity)

$2,390

$2,767

$3,162

$3,613

$4,128

Softball (Jr. Varsity)

$1,565

$1,747

$1,927

$2,377

$2,857

Winter Indoor Track (Varsity)

$2,390

$2,767

$3,162

$3,613

$4,128

Winter Indoor Track (Assistant)

$1,383

$1,565

$1,747

$2,198

$2,671

Spring Track (Varsity)

$2,390

$2,767

$3,162

$3,613

$4,128

Spring Track (Assistant)

$1,565

$1,747

$1,927

$2,377

$2,857

Winter Weight

$1,383

$1,565

$1,747

$2,198

$2,671

Summer Weight

$1,383

$1,565

$1,747

$2,198

$2,671

Golf

$1,565

$1,747

$1,927

$2,337

$2,815

Tennis

$1,565

$1,747

$1,927

$2,337

$2,815

Fall Cheerleading

$1,383

$1,565

$1,747

$2,198

$2,671

Winter Cheerleading

$1,383

$1,565

$1,747

$2,198

$2,671

THMS Head Football Coach

$1,383

$1,565

$1,747

$2,198

$2,670

THMS Asst Football Coach

$1,155

$1,337

$1,519

$1,970

$2,441

THMS Field Hockey Coach

$1,383

$1,565

$1,747

$2,198

$2,670

THMS Cheerleading Coach

$692

$783

$872

$1,098

$1,336

THMS Basketball Coach

$1,383

$1,565

$1,747

$2,198

$2,670

Extra-Curricular Salary Schedule

Note: The amount listed represent single-advisor, school-year commitment. Positions may be shared or split into half-year situations.

School

Activity

FY15 (2014-2015)

FY16 (2015-2016)

FY17 (2016-2017)

 

Tier I

 

 

 

LHS

Yearbook

2,693

2,747

2,802

 

Tier II

 

 

 

LHS

Senior Class Advisor

1,939

1,978

2,017

LHS

Student Council

1,831

1,868

1,905

LHS

Musical Director

1,616

1,648

1,681

LHS

Senior Class Play

1,616

1,648

1,681

TCP& PRI

After School Activities Coordinator (NEW)

1,616

1,648

1,681

 

Nursing Coordinator

1,568

1,599

1,631

 

Tier III

 

 

 

LHS

After School Chorus

1,131

1,154

1,177

LHS

Class Advisor - Junior

1,563

1,594

1,626

LHS

Class Advisor - Sophomore

1,239

1,264

1,289

LHS

Class Advisor - Freshman

1,131

1,154

1,177

LHS

Marching Band Director

1,292

1,318

1,345

LHS

Jazz Band Director

1,131

1,154

1,177

THMS

Yearbook THMS

1,292

1,318

1,345

THMS

Student Government & ELNA Coordinator Grade 7&8

1,131

1,154

1,177

 

Tier IV

 

 

 

LHS

Art Club LHS

647

660

673

LHS

SADD

647

660

673

LHS

Competitive Class Play Grade 10

754

769

784

LHS

Competitive Class Play Grade 11

754

769

784

LHS

Competitive Class Play Grade 12

754

769

784

THMS

Cross Country Club

754

769

784

LHS

Latin Club LHS

754

769

784

THMS

Latin Club THMS

754

769

784

THMS

Spring Track

754

769

784

LHS

Service Learning Club LHS/ELNA (NEW)

754

769

784

LHS

Mock Trial

754

769

784

LHS

National Honor Society

862

879

897

 

 

Tier V

 

 

 

 

THMS

Student Government Grade 6 THMS

430

439

448

 

LHS

Outdoor Adventure

539

549

560

 

THMS

Jazz Band Director (THMS)

539

549

560

 

LHS

Knights Herald

539

549

560

 

LHS

Gateway Literary Magazine

539

549

560

 

THMS

Art Club THMS

430

439

448

 

TCP& PRI

After School Instructor (NEW)

430

439

448

 

THMS

Best Buddies THMS

430

439

448

 

LHS

Best Buddies LHS

647

660

673

 

LHS

Becca's Closet

430

439

448

 

THMS

Cross Country Skiing Club

215

220

224

 

THMS

Drama Club

323

330

336

 

LHS

Photography Club

539

549

560

 

THMS

Field Hockey THMS

215

220

224

 

THMS

Floor Hockey THMS

215

220

224

 

LHS

French Club LHS

539

549

560

 

THMS

Instrumental Instruction

430

439

448

 

LHS

Math Team

614

626

639

 

THMS

Service Learning Club THMS (NEW)

430

439

448

 

TCP

Service Learning Club TCP (NEW)

430

439

448

 

PS

Service Learning Club Primary (NEW)

430

439

448

 

LHS

Talent Show LHS

430

439

448

 

THMS

Talent Show THMS

430

439

448

 

 

Tier VI-all new activities

 

 

 

 

System

System Tier

 

 

 

 

District

ELL Assessment

486

495

505

 

District

Curriculum Task Force

486

495

505

 

District

Curriculum Committees

486

495

505

 

District

Multi-Cultural Festival Director

1,292

1,318

1,345

 

LHS

Saturday Detention

1,659

1,692

1,726

 

LHS

After School Detention Supervisor

1,659

1,692

1,726

 

District

Mentor Team Member

1,885

1,923

1,961

 

TCP

Nature's Classroom Coordinator TCP

1,077

1,099

1,121

 

THMS

Washington D. C. Class Trip Coordinator

808

824

840

 

LHS

Department Head/Instructional Leaders Salaries

1803 base + 208/person

1839 base + 208/person

1876 base + 208/person

 

ALL

Ski Club

617

629

642

 

 

Driver Education Classroom Instructor (based upon enrollment)

960

979

999

 

 

Driver Education Road Instructor (2) (based upon enrollment)

293

299

305

 

APPENDIX C

EVALUATION

1)  Purpose of Educator Evaluation

A)  This contract language is locally negotiated and based on M.G.L., c.71, § 38; M.G.L. C.150E; the Educator Evaluation regulations, 603 CMR 35.00 et seq.; and the Model System for Educator Evaluation developed and which may be updated from time to time by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. See 603 CMR 35.02 (definition of model system). In the event of a conflict between this collective bargaining agreement and the governing laws and regulations, the laws and regulations will prevail.

B)  The regulatory purposes of evaluation are:

i)  To promote student learning, growth, and achievement by providing Educators with feedback for improvement, enhanced opportunities for professional growth, and clear structures for accountability, 603 CMR 35.01(2)(a);

ii)  To provide a record of facts and assessments for personnel decisions, 35.01(2)(b);

iii) To ensure that every school committee has a system to enhance the professionalism and accountability of teachers and administrators that will enable them to assist all students to perform at high levels, 35.01(3); and

iv)  To assure effective teaching and administrative leadership, 35.01(3).

2)  Definitions (* indicates definition is generally based on 603 CMR 35.02)

A)  * Artifacts of Professional Practice: Products of an Educator's work and student work samples that demonstrate the Educator's knowledge and skills with respect to specific performance standards.

B)  Caseload Educator: Educators who teach or counsel individual or small groups of students through consultation with the regular classroom teacher, for example, school nurses, guidance counselors, speech and language pathologists, and some reading specialists and special education teachers.

C)  Classroom teacher: Educators who teach preK-12 whole classes, and teachers of special subjects as such as art, music, library, and physical education. May also include special education teachers and reading specialists who teach whole classes.

D)  Categories of Evidence: Multiple measures of student learning, growth, and achievement, judgments based on observations and artifacts of professional practice, including unannounced observations of practice of at least ten (10 ) minutes ; and additional evidence relevant to one or more Standards of Effective Teaching Practice (603 CMR 35.03).

E)  * District-determined Measures: Measures of student learning, growth and achievement related to the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks, Massachusetts Vocational Technical Education Frameworks, or other relevant frameworks, that are comparable across grade or subject level district-wide. These measures may include, but shall not be limited to: portfolios approved commercial assessments and district-developed pre and post unit and course assessments, and capstone projects.

F)  *Educator(s): Inclusive term that applies to all classroom teachers and caseload educators, unless otherwise noted.

G)  * Educator Plan: The growth or improvement actions identified as part of each Educator's evaluation. The type of plan is determined by the Educator's career stage, overall performance rating, and the rating of impact on student learning, growth and achievement. There shall be four types of Educator Plans:

i)  Developing Educator Plan shall mean a plan developed by the Educator and the Evaluator for one school year or less for an Educator without Professional Teacher Status (PTS); or, at the discretion of an Evaluator, for an Educator with PTS in a new assignment.

ii)  Self-Directed Growth Plan shall mean a plan developed by the Educator for one or two school years for Educators with PTS who are rated proficient or exemplary.

iii)  Directed Growth Plan shall mean a plan developed by the Educator and the Evaluator of one school year or less for Educators with PTS who are rated needs improvement.

iv)  Improvement Plan shall mean a plan developed by the Evaluator of at least 45 school days and no more than one school year for Educators with PTS who are rated unsatisfactory with goals specific to improving the Educator's unsatisfactory performance. In those cases where an Educator is rated unsatisfactory near the close of a school year, the plan may include activities during the summer preceding the next school year.

H)  *ESE: The Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.

I)  * Evaluation: The ongoing process of defining goals and identifying, gathering, and using information as part of a process to improve professional performance (the "formative evaluation" and "formative assessment") and to assess total job effectiveness and make personnel decisions (the "summative evaluation").

J)  * Evaluator: Any person designated by a superintendent who has primary or supervisory responsibility for observation and evaluation. The superintendent is responsible for ensuring that all Evaluators have training in the principles of supervision and evaluation. Each Educator will have one primary Evaluator at any one time responsible for determining performance ratings.

i)  Primary Evaluator shall be the person who determines the Educator's performance ratings and evaluation.

ii)  Supervising Evaluator shall be the person responsible for developing the Educator Plan, supervising the Educator's progress through formative assessments, evaluating the Educator's progress toward attaining the Educator Plan goals, and making recommendations about the evaluation ratings to the primary Evaluator at the end of the Educator Plan. The Supervising Evaluator may be the primary Evaluator or his/her designee.

iii)  Teaching Staff Assigned to More Than One Building: Each Educator who is assigned to more than one building will be evaluated by the appropriate administrator where the individual is assigned most of the time. The principal of each building in which the Educator serves must review and sign the evaluation, and may add written comments. In cases where there is no predominate assignment, the superintendent will determine who the primary evaluator will be.

iv)  Notification: The Educator shall be notified in writing of his/her primary Evaluator and supervising Evaluator, if any, at the outset of each new evaluation cycle. The Evaluator(s) may be changed upon notification in writing to the Educator.

K)  Evaluation Cycle: A five-component process that all Educators follow consisting of 1) Self-Assessment; 2) Goal-setting and Educator Plan development; 3) Implementation of the Plan; 4) Formative Assessment/Evaluation; and 5) Summative Evaluation.

L)  *Experienced Educator: An educator with Professional Teacher Status (PTS).

M)  * Family: Includes students' parents, legal guardians, foster parents, or primary caregivers.

N)  *Formative Assessment: The process used to assess progress towards attaining goals set forth in Educator plans, performance on standards, or both. This process may take place at any time(s) during the cycle of evaluation, but typically takes place at mid-cycle.

O)  * Formative Evaluation: An evaluation conducted at the end of Year 1 for an Educator on a 2-year Self-Directed Growth plan which is used to arrive at a rating on progress towards attaining the goals set forth in the Educator Plan, performance on Standards and Indicators of Effective Teaching Practice, or both.

P)  *Goal: A specific, actionable, and measurable area of improvement as set forth in an Educator's plan. A goal may pertain to any or all of the following: Educator practice in relation to Performance Standards, Educator practice in relation to indicators, or specified improvement in student learning, growth and achievement. Goals may be developed by individual Educators, by the Evaluator, or by teams, departments, or groups of Educators who have the same role.

Q)  * Measurable: That which can be classified or estimated in relation to a scale, rubric, or standards.

R)  Multiple Measures of Student Learning: Measures must include a combination of classroom, school and district assessments, student growth percentiles on state assessments, if state assessments are available, and student MEPA gain scores. This definition may be revised as required by regulations or agreement of the parties upon issuance of ESE guidance expected by July 2012.

S)  * Observation: A data gathering process that includes notes and judgments made during one or more classroom or worksite visits(s) of at least ten (10 ) minutes by the Evaluator and may include examination of artifacts of practice including student work. An observation will occur in person. Classroom or worksite observations conducted pursuant to this article must result in feedback to the Educator. Normal supervisory responsibilities of department, building and district administrators will also cause administrators to drop in on classes and other activities in the worksite at various times as deemed necessary by the administrator. Carrying out these supervisory responsibilities, when they do not result in targeted and constructive feedback to the Educator, are not observations as defined in this Article.

T)  Parties: The parties to this agreement are the local school committee and the employee organization that represents the Educators covered by this agreement for purposes of collective bargaining ("Employee Organization/Association").

U)  *Performance Rating: Describes the Educator's performance on each performance standard and overall. There shall be four performance ratings:

 Exemplary: the Educator's performance consistently and significantly exceeds the requirements of a standard or overall. The rating of exemplary on a standard indicates that practice significantly exceeds proficient and could serve as a model of practice on that standard district-wide.

  Proficient: the Educator's performance fully and consistently meets the requirements of a standard or overall. Proficient practice is understood to be fully satisfactory.

  Needs Improvement: the Educator's performance on a standard or overall is below the requirements of a standard or overall, but is not considered to be unsatisfactory at this time. Improvement is necessary and expected.

  Unsatisfactory: the Educator's performance on a standard or overall has not significantly improved following a rating of needs improvement, or the Educator's performance is consistently below the requirements of a standard or overall and is considered inadequate, or both.

V)  * Performance Standards: Locally developed standards and indicators pursuant to M.G.L. c. 71, § 38 and consistent with, and supplemental to 603 CMR 35.00. The parties may agree to limit standards and indicators to those set forth in 603 CMR 35.03.

W)  * Professional Teacher Status: PTS is the status granted to an Educator pursuant to M.G.L. c. 71, §41.

X)  Rating of Educator Impact on Student Learning: A rating of high, moderate or low based on trends and patterns on state assessments and district-determined measures. The parties will negotiate the process for using state and district-determined measures to arrive at an Educator's rating of impact on student learning, growth and achievement, using guidance and model contract language from ESE, expected by July 2012.

Y)  Rating of Overall Educator Performance: The Educator's overall performance rating is based on the Evaluator's professional judgment and examination of evidence of the Educator's performance against the four Performance Standards and the Educator's attainment of goals set forth in the Educator Plan, as follows:

i)  Standard 1: Curriculum, Planning and Assessment

ii)  Standard 2: Teaching All Students

iii)  Standard 3: Family and Community Engagement

iv)  Standard 4: Professional Culture

v)  Attainment of Professional Practice Goal(s)

vi)  Attainment of Student Learning Goal(s)

Z)  * Rubric: A scoring tool that describes characteristics of practice or artifacts at different levels of performance. The rubrics for Standards and Indicators of Effective Teaching Practice are used to rate Educators on Performance Standards, these rubrics consists of:

i)  Standards: Describes broad categories of professional practice, including those required in 603 CMR 35.03

ii)  Indicators: Describes aspects of each standard, including those required in 603 CMR 35.03

iii)  Elements: Defines the individual components under each indicator

iv)  Descriptors: Describes practice at four levels of performance for each element

AA)  *Summative Evaluation: An evaluation used to arrive at a rating on each standard, an overall rating, and as a basis to make personnel decisions. The summative evaluation includes the Evaluator's judgments of the Educator's performance against Performance Standards and the Educator's attainment of goals set forth in the Educator's Plan.

BB)  * Superintendent: The person employed by the school committee pursuant to M.G.L. c. 71 §59 and §59A. The superintendent is responsible for the implementation of 603 CMR 35.00.

CC)  * Teacher: An Educator employed in a position requiring a certificate or license as described in 603 CMR 7.04(3)(a, b, and d) and in the area of vocational education as provided in 603 CMR 4.00. Teachers may include, for example, classroom teachers, librarians, guidance counselors, or school nurses.

DD)  *Trends in student learning: At least two years of data from the district-determined measures and state assessments used in determining the Educator's rating on impact on student learning as high, moderate or low.

3)  Evidence Used In Evaluation The following categories of evidence shall be used in evaluating each Educator:

A)  Multiple measures of student learning, growth, and achievement, which shall include:

i)  Measures of student progress on classroom assessments that are aligned with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks or other relevant frameworks and are comparable within grades or subjects in a school;

ii)  At least two district-determined measures of student learning related to the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks or the Massachusetts Vocational Technical Education Frameworks or other relevant frameworks that are comparable across grades and/or subjects district-wide. These measures may include: portfolios, approved commercial assessments and district-developed pre and post unit and course assessments, and capstone projects. One such measure shall be the MCAS Student Growth Percentile (SGP) or Massachusetts English Proficiency Assessment gain scores, if applicable, in which case at least two years of data is required.

iii)  Measures of student progress and/or achievement toward student learning goals set between the Educator and Evaluator for the school year or some other period of time established in the Educator Plan.

iv)  For Educators whose primary role is not as a classroom teacher, the appropriate measures of the Educator's contribution to student learning, growth, and achievement set by the district. The measures set by the district should be based on the Educator's role and responsibility.

B)  Judgments based on observations and artifacts of practice including:

i)  Unannounced observations of practice of at least ten (10) minutes.

ii)  Announced observation(s) for non-PTS Educators in their first year of practice in a school, Educators on Improvement Plans, and as determined by the Evaluator.

iii)  Examination of Educator work products.

iv)  Examination of student work samples.

C)  Evidence relevant to one or more Performance Standards, including but not limited to: i) Evidence compiled and presented by the Educator, including:

(a)  Evidence of fulfillment of professional responsibilities and growth such as self-assessments, peer collaboration, professional development linked to goals in the Educator plans, contributions to the school community and professional culture;

(b)  Evidence of active outreach to and engagement with families; ii) Evidence of progress towards professional practice goal(s);

iii)  Evidence of progress toward student learning outcomes goal(s).

iv)  Student and Staff Feedback - see # 23-24, below; and

v)  Any other relevant evidence from any source that the Evaluator shares with the Educator. Other relevant evidence could include information provided by other administrators such as the superintendent.

4)  Rubric

The rubrics (Appendix B) are a scoring tool used for the Educator's self-assessment, the formative assessment, the formative evaluation and the summative evaluation5) Evaluation Cycle: Training

A)  Prior to the implementation of the new evaluation process contained in this article, districts shall arrange training for all Educators, principals, and other evaluators that outlines the components of the new evaluation process and provides an explanation of the evaluation cycle. The district through the superintendent shall determine the type and quality of training based on guidance provided by ESE.

B)  By November 1st of the first year of this agreement, all Educators shall complete a professional learning activity about self-assessment and goal-setting satisfactory to the superintendent or principal. Any Educator hired after the November 1 st date, and who has not previously completed such an activity, shall complete such a professional learning activity about self-assessment and goal-setting within three months of the date of hire. The district through the superintendent shall determine the type and quality of the learning activity based on guidance provided by ESE.

6)  Evaluation Cycle: Annual Orientation

A)  At the start of each school year, the superintendent, principal or designee shall conduct a meeting for Educators and Evaluators focused substantially on educator evaluation. The superintendent, principal or designee shall:

i)  Provide an overview of the evaluation process, including goal setting and the educator plans.

ii)  Provide all Educators with directions for obtaining a copy of the forms used by the district. These may be electronically provided.

iii)  The faculty meeting may be digitally recorded to facilitate orientation of Educators hired after the beginning of the school year.

7)  Evaluation Cycle: Self-Assessment

A)  Completing the Self-Assessment

i)  The evaluation cycle begins with the Educator completing and submitting to the Primary or Supervising Evaluator a self-assessment by October 1st or within four weeks of the start of their employment at the school.

ii)  The self-assessment includes:

(a)  An analysis of evidence of student learning, growth and achievement for students under the Educator's responsibility.

(b)  An assessment of practice against each of the four Performance Standards of effective practice using the district's rubric.

(c)  Proposed goals to pursue:

(1st)  At least one goal directly related to improving the Educator's own professional practice.

(2nd)  At least one goal directed related to improving student learning.

B)  Proposing the goals

i)  Educators must consider goals for grade-level, subject-area, department teams, or other groups of Educators who share responsibility for student learning and results, except as provided in (ii) below. Educators may meet with teams to consider establishing team goals. Evaluators may participate in such meetings.

ii)  For Educators in their first year of practice, the Evaluator or his/her designee will meet with each Educator by October 1st (or within four weeks of the Educator's first day of employment if the Educator begins employment after September 15th) to assist the Educator in completing the self-assessment and drafting the professional practice and student learning goals which must include induction and mentoring activities.

iii)  Unless the Evaluator indicates that an Educator in his/her second or third years of practice should continue to address induction and mentoring goals pursuant to 603 CMR 7.12, the Educator may address shared grade level or subject area team goals.

iv)  For Educators with PTS and ratings of proficient or exemplary, the goals may be team goals. In addition, these Educators may include individual professional practice goals that address enhancing skills that enable the Educator to share proficient practices with colleagues or develop leadership skills.

v)  For Educators with PTS and ratings of needs improvement or unsatisfactory, the professional practice goal(s) must address specific standards and indicators identified for improvement. In addition, the goals may address shared grade level or subject area team goals.

8)  Evaluation Cycle: Goal Setting and Development of the Educator Plan

A)  Every Educator has an Educator Plan that includes, but is not limited to, one goal related to the improvement of practice; one goal for the improvement of student learning. The Plan also outlines actions the Educator must take to attain the goals established in the Plan and benchmarks to assess progress. Goals may be developed by individual Educators, by the Evaluator, or by teams, departments, or groups of Educators who have the similar roles and/or responsibilities. See Sections 15-19 for more on Educator Plans.

B)  To determine the goals to be included in the Educator Plan, the Evaluator reviews the goals the Educator has proposed in the Self-Assessment, using evidence of Educator performance and impact on student learning, growth and achievement based on the Educator's self-assessment and other sources that Evaluator shares with the Educator. The process for determining the Educator's impact on student learning, growth and achievement will be determined after ESE issues guidance on this matter. See #22, below.

C)  Educator Plan Development Meetings shall be conducted as follows:

i)  Educators in the same school may meet with the Evaluator in teams and/or individually at the end of the previous evaluation cycle or by October 15th of the next academic year to develop their Educator Plan. Educators shall not be expected to meet during the summer hiatus.

ii)  For those Educators new to the school, the meeting with the Evaluator to establish the Educator Plan must occur by October 15th or within six weeks of the start of their assignment in that school

iii)  The Evaluator shall meet individually with Educators with PTS and ratings of needs improvement or unsatisfactory to develop professional practice goal(s) that must address specific standards and indicators identified for improvement. In addition, the goals may address shared grade level or subject matter goals.

D)  The Evaluator completes the Educator Plan by November 1 st. The Educator shall sign the Educator Plan within 5 school days of its receipt and may include a written response. The Educator's signature indicates that the Educator received the plan in a timely fashion. The signature does not indicate agreement or disagreement with its contents. The Evaluator retains final authority over the content of the Educator's Plan.

9)  Evaluation Cycle: Observation of Practice and Examination of Artifacts - Educators without PTS

A)  In the first year of practice or first year assigned to a school:

i)  The Educator shall have at least one announced observation during the school year using the protocol described in section 11 B, below.

ii)  The Educator shall have at least four unannounced observations during the school year.

B)  In their second and third years of practice or second and third years as a non-PTS Educator in the school:

i)  The Educator shall have at least three unannounced observations during the school year.

10)  Evaluation Cycle: Observation of Practice and Examination of Artifacts - Educators with PTS

A)  The Educator whose overall rating is proficient or exemplary must have at least one unannounced observation during the evaluation cycle.

B)  The Educator whose overall rating is needs improvement must be observed according to the Directed Growth Plan during the period of Plan which must include at least two unannounced observations.

C)  The Educator whose overall rating is unsatisfactory must be observed according to the Improvement Plan which must include both unannounced and announced observation. The number and frequency of the observations shall be determined by the Evaluator, but in no case, for improvement plans of one year, shall there be fewer than one announced and four unannounced observations. For Improvement Plans of six months or fewer, there must be no fewer than one announced and two unannounced observations.

11)  Observations

The Evaluator's first observation of the Educator should take place by November 15. Observations required by the Educator Plan should be completed by May 15th. The Evaluator may conduct additional observations after this date.

The Evaluator is not required nor expected to review all the indicators in a rubric during an observation.

A)  Unannounced Observations

i)  Unannounced observations may be in the form of partial or full-period classroom visitations, Instructional Rounds, Walkthroughs, Learning Walks, or any other means deemed useful by the Evaluator, principal, superintendent or other administrator.

ii)  The Educator will be provided with at least brief written feedback from the Evaluator within 3-5 school days of the observation. The written feedback shall be delivered to the Educator in person, by email, placed in the Educator's mailbox or mailed to the Educator's home.

iii)  Any observation or series of observations resulting in one or more standards judged to be unsatisfactory or needs improvement for the first time must be followed by at least one observation of at least 30 minutes in duration within 30 school days.

B)  Announced Observations

i)  All non-PTS Educators in their first year in the school, PTS Educators on Improvement Plans and PTS educators during the year of formative assessment at the discretion of the evaluator shall have at least one Announced Observation.

(a)  The Evaluator shall select the date and time of the lesson or activity to be observed and discuss with the Educator any specific goal(s) for the observation.

(b)  Within 5 school days of the scheduled observation, upon request of either the Evaluator or Educator, the Evaluator and Educator shall meet for a pre-observation conference. In lieu of a meeting, the Educator may inform the Evaluator in writing of the nature of the lesson, the student population served, and any other information that will assist the Evaluator to assess performance

(1st)  The Educator shall provide the Evaluator a draft of the lesson, student conference, IEP plan or activity. If the actual plan is different, the Educator will provide the Evaluator with a copy prior to the observation.

(2nd)  The Educator will be notified as soon as possible if the Evaluator will not be able to attend the scheduled observation. The observation will be rescheduled with the Educator as soon as reasonably practical.

(c)  Within 5 school days of the observation, the Evaluator and Educator shall meet for a post-observation conference. This timeframe may be extended due to unavailability on the part of either the Evaluator or the Educator, but shall be rescheduled within 24 hours if possible.

(d)  The Evaluator shall provide the Educator with written feedback within 5 school days of the post-observation conference. For any standard where the Educator's practice was found to be unsatisfactory or needs improvement, the feedback must:

(1st)  Describe the basis for the Evaluator's judgment.

(2nd)  Describe actions the Educator should take to improve his/her performance.

(3rd)  Identify support and/or resources the Educator may use in his/her improvement.

(4th)  State that the Educator is responsible for addressing the need for improvement.

12)  Evaluation Cycle: Formative Assessment

A)  A specific purpose for evaluation is to promote student learning, growth and achievement by providing Educators with feedback for improvement. Evaluators are expected to make frequent unannounced visits to classrooms. Evaluators are expected to give targeted constructive feedback to Educators based on their observations of practice, examination of artifacts, and analysis of multiple measures of student learning, growth and achievement in relation to the Standards and Indicators of Effective Teaching Practice.

B)  Formative Assessment may be ongoing throughout the evaluation cycle but typically takes places mid-cycle when a Formative Assessment report is completed. For an Educator on a two-year Self-Directed Growth Plan, the mid-cycle Formative Assessment report is replaced by the Formative Evaluation report at the end of year one. See section 13, below.

C)  The Formative Assessment report provides written feedback and ratings to the Educator about his/her progress towards attaining the goals set forth in the Educator Plan, performance on Performance Standards and overall, or both

D)  No less than two weeks before the due date for the Formative Assessment report, which due date shall be established by the Evaluator with written notice to the Educator, the Educator shall provide to the Evaluator evidence of family outreach and engagement, fulfillment of professional responsibility and growth, and progress on attaining professional practice and student learning goals. The educator may provide to the evaluator additional evidence of the educator's performances against the four Performance Standards.

E)  Upon the request of either the Evaluator or the Educator, the Evaluator and the Educator will meet either before or after completion of the Formative Assessment Report.

F)  The Evaluator shall complete the Formative Assessment report and provide a copy to the Educator. All Formative Assessment reports must be signed by the Evaluator and delivered face-to-face, by email or to the Educator's school mailbox or home.

G)  The Educator may reply in writing to the Formative Assessment report within 5 school days of receiving the report.

H)  The Educator shall sign the Formative Assessment report by within 5 school days of receiving the report. The signature indicates that the Educator received the Formative Assessment report in a timely fashion. The signature does not indicate agreement or disagreement with its contents.

I)  As a result of the Formative Assessment Report, the Evaluator may change the activities in the Educator Plan in a face-to-face conference with the educator

J)  If the rating in the Formative Assessment report differs from the last summative rating the Educator received, the Evaluator may place the Educator on a different Educator Plan, appropriate to the new rating.

13)  Evaluation Cycle: Formative Evaluation for Two Year Self-Directed Plans Only

A)  Educators on two year Self-Directed Growth Educator Plans receive a Formative Evaluation report near the end of the first year of the two year cycle. The Educator's performance rating for that year shall be assumed to be the same as the previous summative rating unless evidence demonstrates a significant change in performance in which case the rating on the performance standards may change, and the Evaluator may place the Educator on a different Educator plan, appropriate to the new rating.

B)  The Formative Evaluation report provides written feedback and ratings to the Educator about his/her progress towards attaining the goals set forth in the Educator Plan, performance on each performance standard and overall, or both.

C)  No less than two weeks before the due date for the Formative Evaluation report, which due date shall be established by the Evaluator with written notice provided to the Educator, the Educator shall provide to the Evaluator evidence of family outreach and engagement, fulfillment of professional responsibility and growth, and progress on attaining professional practice and student learning goals. The educator may also provide to the evaluator additional evidence of the educator's performance against the four Performance Standards.

D)  The Evaluator shall complete the Formative Evaluation report and provide a copy to the Educator. All Formative Evaluation reports must be signed by the Evaluator and delivered face-to-face, by email or to the Educator's school mailbox or home.

E)  Upon the request of either the Evaluator or the Educator, the Evaluator and the Educator will meet either before or after completion of the Formative Evaluation Report.

F)  The Educator may reply in writing to the Formative Evaluation report within 5 school days of receiving the report.

G)  The Educator shall sign the Formative Evaluation report by within 5 school days of receiving the report. The signature indicates that the Educator received the Formative Evaluation report in a timely fashion. The signature does not indicate agreement or disagreement with its contents.

H)  As a result of the Formative Evaluation report, the Evaluator may change the activities in the Educator Plan.

I)  If the rating in the Formative Evaluation report differs from the last summative rating the Educator received, the Evaluator may place the Educator on a different Educator Plan, appropriate to the new rating.

14)  Evaluation Cycle: Summative Evaluation

A)  The evaluation cycle concludes with a summative evaluation report. For Educators on a one or two year Educator Plan, the summative report must be written and provided to the educator by June 1 st.

B)  The Evaluator determines a rating on each standard and an overall rating based on the Evaluator's professional judgment, an examination of evidence against the Performance Standards and evidence of the attainment of the Educator Plan goals.

C)  The professional judgment of the primary evaluator shall determine the overall summative rating that the Educator receives.

D)  For an educator whose overall performance rating is exemplary or proficient and whose impact on student learning is low, the evaluator's supervisor shall discuss and review the rating with the evaluator and the supervisor shall confirm or revise the educator's rating. In cases where the superintendent serves as the primary evaluator, the superintendent's decision on the rating shall not be subject to review.

E)  The summative evaluation rating must be based on evidence from multiple categories of evidence. MCAS Growth scores shall not be the sole basis for a summative evaluation rating.

F)  To be rated proficient overall, the Educator shall, at a minimum, have been rated proficient on the Curriculum, Planning and Assessment and the Teaching All Students Standards of Effective Teaching Practice.

G)  No less than four weeks before the due date for the Summative Evaluation report, which due date shall be established by the Evaluator with written notice provided to the Educator, the Educator will provide to the Evaluator evidence of family outreach and engagement, fulfillment of professional responsibility and growth, and progress on attaining professional practice and student learning goals. The educator may also provide to the evaluator additional evidence of the educator's performance against the four Performance Standards.

H)  The Summative Evaluation report should recognize areas of strength as well as identify recommendations for professional growth.

I)  The Evaluator shall deliver a signed copy of the Summative Evaluation report to the Educator face-to-face, by email or to the Educator's school mailbox or home no later than June 1st.

J)  The Evaluator shall meet with the Educator rated needs improvement or unsatisfactory to discuss the summative evaluation. The meeting shall occur by June 1st.

K)  The Evaluator may meet with the Educator rated proficient or exemplary to discuss the summative evaluation, if either the Educator or the Evaluator requests such a meeting. The meeting shall occur by June 10th.

L)  Upon mutual agreement, the Educator and the Evaluator may develop the Self-Directed Growth Plan for the following two years during the meeting on the Summative Evaluation report.

M)  The Educator shall sign the final Summative Evaluation report by June 15th. The signature indicates that the Educator received the Summative Evaluation report in a timely fashion. The signature does not indicate agreement or disagreement with its contents.

N)  The Educator shall have the right to respond in writing to the summative evaluation which shall become part of the final Summative Evaluation report.

O)  A copy of the signed final Summative Evaluation report shall be filed in the Educator's personnel file.

15)  Educator Plans - General

A)  Educator Plans shall be designed to provide Educators with feedback for improvement, professional growth, and leadership; and to ensure Educator effectiveness and overall system accountability. The Plan must be aligned to the standards and indicators and be consistent with district and school goals.

B)  The Educator Plan shall include, but is not limited to:

i)  At least one goal related to improvement of practice tied to one or more Performance Standards;

ii)  At least one goal for the improvement the learning, growth and achievement of the students under the Educator's responsibility;

iii)  An outline of actions the Educator must take to attain the goals and benchmarks to assess progress. Actions must include specified professional development and learning activities that the Educator will participate in as a means of obtaining the goals, as well as other support that may be suggested by the Evaluator or provided by the school or district. Examples may include but are not limited to coursework, self-study, action research, curriculum development, study groups with peers, and implementing new programs.

C)  It is the Educator's responsibility to attain the goals in the Plan and to participate in any trainings and professional development provided through the state, district, or other providers in accordance with the Educator Plan.

16)  Educator Plans: Developing Educator Plan

A)  The Developing Educator Plan is for all Educators without PTS, and, at the discretion of the Evaluator, Educators with PTS in new assignments.

B)  The Educator shall be evaluated at least annually.

17)  Educator Plans: Self-Directed Growth Plan

A)  A Two-year Self-Directed Growth Plan is for those Educators with PTS who have an overall rating of proficient or exemplary, and after 2013-2014 whose impact on student learning is moderate or high. A formative evaluation report is completed at the end of year 1 and a summative evaluation report at the end of year 2.

B)  A One-year Self-Directed Growth Plan is for those Educators with PTS who have an overall rating of proficient or exemplary, and after 2013-2014 whose impact on student learning is low. In this case, the Evaluator and Educator shall analyze the discrepancy between the summative evaluation rating and the rating for impact on student learning to seek to determine the cause(s) of the discrepancy.

18)  Educator Plans: Directed Growth Plan

A)  A Directed Growth Plan is for those Educators with PTS whose overall rating is needs improvement.

B)  The goals in the Plan must address areas identified as needing improvement as determined by the Evaluator.

C)  The Evaluator shall complete a summative evaluation for the Educator at the end of the period determined by the Plan, but at least annually, and in no case later than June 10th.

D)  For an Educator on a Directed Growth Plan whose overall performance rating is at least proficient, the Evaluator will place the Educator on a Self-Directed Growth Plan for the next Evaluation Cycle.

E)  For an Educator on a Directed Growth Plan whose overall performance rating is not at least proficient, the Evaluator will rate the Educator as unsatisfactory and will place the Educator on an Improvement Plan for the next Evaluation Cycle.

19)  Educator Plans: Improvement Plan

A)  An Improvement Plan is for those Educators with PTS whose overall rating is unsatisfactory.

B)  The parties agree that in order to provide students with the best instruction, it may be necessary from time to time to place an Educator whose practice has been rated as unsatisfactory on an Improvement Plan of no fewer than 45 school days and no more than one school year. In the case of an Educator receiving a rating of unsatisfactory near the close of one school year, the Improvement Plan may include activities that occur during the summer before the next school year begins.

C)  The Evaluator must complete a summative evaluation for the Educator at the end of the period determined by the Evaluator for the Plan.

D)  An Educator on an Improvement Plan shall be assigned a Supervising Evaluator (see definitions). The Supervising Evaluator is responsible for providing the Educator with guidance and assistance in accessing the resources and professional development outlined in the Improvement Plan. The primary evaluator may be the Supervising Evaluator.

E)  The Improvement Plan shall define the problem(s) of practice identified through the observations and evaluation and detail the improvement goals to be met, the activities the Educator must take to improve and the assistance to be provided to the Educator by the district.

F)  The Improvement Plan process shall include:

i)  Within ten school days of notification to the Educator that the Educator is being placed on an Improvement Plan, the Evaluator shall schedule a meeting with the Educator to discuss the Improvement Plan. The Evaluator will develop the Improvement Plan, which will include the provision of specific assistance to the Educator.

ii)  The Educator may request that a representative of the Employee Organization/Association attend the meeting(s).

iii)  If the Educator consents, the Employee Organization/Association will be informed that an Educator has been placed on an Improvement Plan.

G)  The Improvement Plan shall:

i)  Define the improvement goals directly related to the performance standard(s) and/or student learning outcomes that must be improved;

ii)  Describe the activities and work products the Educator must complete as a means of improving performance;

iii)  Describe the assistance that the district will make available to the Educator;

iv)  Articulate the measurable outcomes that will be accepted as evidence of improvement;

v)  Detail the timeline for completion of each component of the Plan, including at a minimum a mid-cycle formative assessment report of the relevant standard(s) and indicator(s);

vi)  Identify the individuals assigned to assist the Educator which must include minimally the Supervising Evaluator; and,

vii)  Include the signatures of the Educator and Supervising Evaluator.

H)  A copy of the signed Plan shall be provided to the Educator. The Educator's signature indicates that the Educator received the Improvement Plan in a timely fashion. The signature does not indicate agreement or disagreement with its contents.

I)  Decision on the Educator's status at the conclusion of the Improvement Plan.

i)  All determinations below must be made no later than June 1. One of three decisions must be made at the conclusion of the Improvement Plan:

(a)  If the Evaluator determines that the Educator has improved his/her practice to the level of proficiency, the Educator will be placed on a Self-Directed Growth Plan.

(b)  In those cases where the Educator was placed on an Improvement Plan as a result of his/her summative rating at the end of his/her Directed Growth Plan, if the Evaluator determines that the Educator is making substantial progress toward proficiency, the Evaluator shall place the Educator on a Directed Growth Plan.

(c)  In those cases where the Educator was placed on an Improvement Plan as a result of his/her Summative rating at the end of his/her Directed Growth Plan, if the Evaluator determines that the Educator is not making substantial progress toward proficiency, the Evaluator shall recommend to the superintendent that the Educator be dismissed.

(d)  If the Evaluator determines that the Educator's practice remains at the level of unsatisfactory, the Evaluator shall recommend to the superintendent that the Educator be dismissed.

20.  Timelines

Activity:

Completed By:

Superintendent, principal or designee meets with evaluators and educators to explain evaluation process

September 15

Evaluator meets with first-year educators to assist in self-assessment and goal setting process

October 1

Educator submits self-assessment and proposed goals

 

Evaluator meets with Educators in teams or individually to establish Educator Plans (Educator Plan may be established at Summative Evaluation Report meeting in prior school year)

October 15

Evaluator completes Educator Plans

November 1

Evaluator should complete first observation of each Educator

November 15

Educator submits evidence on parent outreach, professional growth, progress on goals (and other standards, if desired)

January 5*

* or four weeks before Formative Assessment Report date established by Evaluator

 

Evaluator should complete mid-cycle Formative Assessment Reports for Educators on one-year Educator Plans

February 1

Evaluator holds Formative Assessment Meetings if requested by either Evaluator or Educator

February 15

Educator submits evidence on parent outreach, professional growth, progress on goals (and other standards, if desired)

April 20*

*or 4 weeks prior to Summative Evaluation Report date established by evaluator

 

Evaluator completes Summative Evaluation Report

June 1

Evaluator meets with Educators whose overall Summative Evaluation ratings are Needs Improvement or Unsatisfactory

June 10

Evaluator meets with Educators whose ratings are proficient or exemplary at request of Evaluator or Educator

June 10

Educator signs Summative Evaluation Report and adds response, if any within 5 school days of receipt

June 15

A)  Educators with PTS on Two Year Plans

Activity:

Completed By:

Evaluator completes unannounced observation(s)

Any time during the 2-year evaluation cycle

Evaluator completes Formative Evaluation Report

June 1 of Year 1

Evaluator conducts Formative Evaluation Meeting, if any

June 1 of Year 1

Evaluator completes Summative Evaluation Report

June 1 of Year 2

Evaluator conducts Summative Evaluation Meeting, if any

June 10 of Year 2

Evaluator and Educator sign Summative Evaluation Report

June 15 of Year 2

21.  Career Advancement

A)  In order to attain Professional Teacher Status, the Educator should achieve ratings of proficient or exemplary on each Performance Standard and overall. A principal considering making an employment decision that would lead to PTS for any Educator who has not been rated proficient or exemplary on each performance standard and overall on the most recent evaluation shall confer with the superintendent by May 1. The principal's decision is subject to review and approval by the superintendent.

B)  In order to qualify to apply for a teacher leader position, the Educator must have had a Summative Evaluation performance rating of proficient or exemplary for at least the previous two years.

C)  Educators with PTS whose summative performance rating is exemplary and, after 2013-14 whose impact on student learning is rated moderate or high, shall be recognized and rewarded with leadership roles, promotions, additional compensation, public commendation or other acknowledgement as determined by the district through collective bargaining where applicable.

22.  Rating Impact on Student Learning Growth

ESE will provide model contract language and guidance on rating educator impact on student learning growth based on state and district-determined measures of student learning by July 15, 2012. Upon receiving this model contract language and guidance, the parties agree to bargain with respect to this matter.

23.  Using Student feedback in Educator Evaluation

ESE will provide model contract language, direction and guidance on using student feedback in Educator Evaluation by June 30, 2013. Upon receiving this model contract language, direction and guidance, the parties agree to bargain with respect to this matter.

24.  Using Staff feedback in Educator Evaluation

ESE will provide model contract language, direction and guidance on using staff feedback in Administrator Evaluation by June 30, 2013. Upon receiving this model contract language, direction and guidance, the parties agree to bargain with respect to this matter.

25.  Transition from Existing Evaluation System

A)  The parties may agree that 50% of more of Educators in the district will be evaluated under the new procedures at the outset of this Agreement, and 50% or fewer will be evaluated under the former evaluation procedures for the first year of implementation of the new procedures in this Agreement.

B)  The parties shall agree on a process for identifying the Educator Plan that each Educator will be placed on during the Educator's first year being evaluated under the new procedures, providing that Educators who have received ratings of unsatisfactory or its equivalent in the prior year will be placed on Self-Directed Growth or Improvement Plans at the sole discretion of the Superintendent.

C)  The parties agree that to address the workload issue of Evaluators, during the first evaluation cycle under this Agreement in every school or department, the names of the Educators who are being placed on Self-directed Growth Plans shall be literally or figuratively "put into a hat." The first fifty (50) percent drawn shall be on a 1-year Self-directed Growth Plan and the second fifty (50) percent shall be on a 2-year Plan.

C)  The existing evaluation system will remain in effect until the provisions set forth in this Article are implemented. The relevant timeframe for adopting and implementing new systems is set forth in 603 CMR 35.11(1).

26.  General Provisions

A)  Only Educators who are licensed may serve as primary evaluators of Educators.

B)  Evaluators shall not make negative comments about the Educator's performance, or comments of a negative evaluative nature, in the presence of students, parents or other staff, except in the unusual circumstance where the Evaluator concludes that s/he must immediately and directly intervene. Nothing in this paragraph is intended to limit an administrator's ability to investigate a complaint, or secure assistance to support an Educator.

C)  The superintendent shall insure that Evaluators have training in supervision and evaluation, including the regulations and standards and indicators of effective teaching practice promulgated by ESE (35.03), and the evaluation Standards and Procedures established in this Agreement.

D)  Should there be a serious disagreement between the Educator and the Evaluator regarding an overall summative performance rating of unsatisfactory, the Educator may meet with the Evaluator's supervisor to discuss the disagreement. Should the Educator request such a meeting, the Evaluator's supervisor must meet with the Educator. The Evaluator may attend any such meeting at the discretion of the superintendent.

D)  The parties agree to establish a joint labor-management evaluation team which shall review the evaluation processes and procedures annually and recommend adjustments to the parties.

E)  Violations of this article are subject to the grievance and arbitration procedures. The arbitrator shall determine whether there was substantial compliance with the totality of the evaluation process. When the evaluation process results in the termination or non­renewal of an Educator, then no financial remedy or reinstatement shall issue if there was substantial compliance.

Appendix D

Educator Evaluation Rubrics

Contract between the Lunenburg Education Association

and the Lunenburg School Committee

July 1, 2011— June 30, 2014

Rubrics - defined in the regulations as "scoring tool[s] that describe characteristics of practice or artifacts at different levels of performance" (603 CMR 35.02) - are a critical component of the Massachusetts educator evaluation framework and are required for every educator. Rubrics are designed to help educators and evaluators (1) develop a consistent, shared understanding of what proficient performance looks like in practice, (2) develop a common terminology and structure to organize evidence, and (3) make informed professional judgments about formative and summative performance ratings on each Standard and overall. This appendix contains the ESE Model Teacher Rubric.

Structure of the Teacher Rubric

●         Standards: Standards are the broad categories of knowledge, skills, and performance of effective practice detailed in the regulations. There are four Standards for teachers: Curriculum, Planning, and Assessment; Teaching All Students; Family and Community Engagement; and Professional Culture.

●         Indicators: Indicators, also detailed in the regulations, describe specific knowledge, skills, and performance for each Standard. For example, there are three Indicators in Standard I of the teacher rubric: Curriculum and Planning; Assessment; and Analysis.

●         Elements: The elements are more specific descriptions of actions and behaviors related to each Indicator. The elements further break down the Indicators into more specific aspects of educator practice and provide an opportunity for evaluators to offer detailed feedback that serves as a roadmap for improvement.

●         Descriptors: Performance descriptors are observable and measurable statements of educator actions and behaviors aligned to each element and serve as the basis for identifying the level of teaching or administrative performance in one of four categories: Unsatisfactory, Needs Improvement, Proficient, or Exemplary.

Use of the Teacher Rubric

This rubric describes teaching practice. It is intended to be used throughout the 5 step evaluation cycle for all teachers, including teachers of whole classrooms, small groups, individual students, or any combination of the above. The rubric is designed to be applicable to general education teachers from pre-K through Advanced Placement, as well as teachers with specialized classes or knowledge, including teachers of English Language Learners, and special education teachers; districts may also choose to use this rubric for educators in other roles such as specialists.

The responsibilities of teachers to whom this rubric will be applied may vary. ESE encourages educators and evaluators to use the rubric strategically by discussing and agreeing upon certain Indicators and Elements that should be high priorities according to that educator's role and responsibilities as well as his/her professional practice and student learning needs. There are a variety of ways to emphasize these components throughout the evaluation cycle. For example, high priority Indicators and/or elements can be analyzed in greater depth during self-assessment, targeted during goal setting, a focus for more comprehensive evidence collection, or all of the above. However, the expectation is that by the end of the evaluation cycle, educators and evaluators have gathered and shared a reasonable amount of evidence on every Indicator to support a rating for each Standard.

Standard I: Curriculum, Planning, and Assessment

Standard II: Teaching All Students

Standard III: Family and Community Engagement

Standard IV: Professional Culture

A. Curriculum and Planning Indicator

A. Instruction Indicator

A. Engagement Indicator

A. Reflection Indicator

1. Subject Matter Knowledge

1. Quality of Effort and Work

1. Parent/Family Engagement

1. Reflective Practice

2. Child and Adolescent Development

2. Student Engagement

 

2. Goal Setting

3. Rigorous Standards-Based Unit Design

3. Meeting Diverse Needs

 

 

4. Well-Structured Lessons

 

 

 

B. Assessment Indicator

B. Learning Environment Indicator

B. Collaboration Indicator

B. Professional Growth Indicator

1. Variety of Assessment Methods

1. Safe Learning Environment

1. Learning Expectations

1. Professional Learning and Growth

2. Adjustments to Practice

2. Collaborative Learning Environment

2. Curriculum Support

 

 

3. Student Motivation

 

 

C. Analysis Indicator

C. Cultural Proficiency

C. Communication

C. Collaboration Indicator

1. Analysis and

Indicator

Indicator

1. Professional

Conclusions

1. Respects

1. Two-Way

Collaboration

2. Sharing Conclusions

Differences

Communication

 

With Colleagues

2. Maintains

2. Culturally Proficient

 

3. Sharing Conclusions With Students

Respectful Environment

Communication

 

 

D. Expectations Indicator

 

D. Decision-Making

 

1. Clear Expectations

 

Indicator

 

2. High Expectations

 

1. Decision-making

 

3. Access to Knowledge

 

 

 

 

 

E. Shared Responsibility Indicator

 

 

 

1. Shared Responsibility

 

 

 

F. Professional Responsibilities Indicator

 

 

 

1. Judgment

 

 

 

2. Reliability and Responsibility

How to reference parts of the rubric:

Indicator terminology: under the "Teaching All Students" Standard (II), the" Instruction Indicator" (A) can be referred to as Indicator ll-A

Element terminology: under the Instruction Indicator (A), the Student Engagement Element (2) can be referred to as Element ll-A-2

Standard I: Curriculum, Planning, and Assessment. The teacher promotes the learning and growth of all students by providing high-quality and coherent instruction, designing and administering authentic and meaningful student assessments, analyzing student performance and growth data, using this data to improve instruction, providing students with constructive feedback on an ongoing basis, and continuously refining learning objectives.

Indicator I-A.     Curriculum and Planning: Knows the subject matter well, has a good grasp of child development and how students learn, and designs effective and rigorous standards-based units of instruction consisting of well-structured lessons with measurable outcomes.

I-A Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

I-A-1. Subject Matter Knowledge

Demonstrates limited knowledge of the subject matter and/or its pedagogy; relies heavily on textbooks or resources for development of the factual content. Rarely engages students in learning experiences focused on complex knowledge or skills in the subject.

Demonstrates factual knowledge of subject matter and the pedagogy it requires by sometimes engaging students in learning experiences around complex knowledge and skills in the subject.

Demonstrates sound knowledge and understanding of the subject matter and the pedagogy it requires by consistently engaging students in learning experiences that enable them to acquire complex knowledge and skills in the subject.

Demonstrates expertise in subject matter and the pedagogy it requires by engaging all students in learning experiences that enable them to synthesize complex knowledge and skills in the subject. Is able to model this element.

I-A-2. Child and Adolescent Development

Demonstrates little or no knowledge of developmental levels of students this age or differences in how students learn. Typically develops one learning experience for all students that does not enable most students to meet the intended outcomes.

Demonstrates knowledge of developmental levels of students this age but does not identify developmental levels and ways of learning among the students in the class and/or develops learning experiences that enable some, but not all, students to move toward meeting intended outcomes.

Demonstrates knowledge of the developmental levels of students in the classroom and the different ways these students learn by providing differentiated learning experiences that enable all students to progress toward meeting intended outcomes.

Demonstrates expert knowledge of the developmental levels of the teacher's own students and students in this grade or subject more generally and uses this knowledge to differentiate and expand learning experiences that enable all students to make significant progress toward meeting stated outcomes. Is able to model this element.

I-A-3. Rigorous Standards-Based Unit Design

Plans individual lessons rather than units of instruction, or designs units of instruction that are not aligned with state standards/ local curricula, lack measurable outcomes, and/or include tasks that mostly rely on lower level thinking skills.

Designs units of instruction that address some knowledge and skills defined in state standards/local curricula, but some student outcomes are poorly defined and/or tasks rarely require higher-order thinking skills.

Designs units of instruction with measurable outcomes and challenging tasks requiring higher-order thinking skills that enable students to learn the knowledge and skills defined in state standards/local curricula.

Designs integrated units of instruction with measurable, accessible outcomes and challenging tasks requiring higher-order thinking skills that enable students to learn and apply the knowledge and skills defined in state standards/local curricula. Is able to model this element.

 

I-A-4. Well-Structured Lessons

Develops lessons with inappropriate student engagement strategies, pacing, sequence, activities, materials, resources, and/or grouping for the intended outcome or for the students in the class.

Develops lessons with only some elements of appropriate student engagement strategies, pacing, sequence, activities, materials, resources, and grouping.

Develops well-structured lessons with challenging, measurable objectives and appropriate student engagement strategies, pacing, sequence, activities, materials, resources, technologies, and grouping.

Develops well-structured and highly engaging lessons with challenging, measurable objectives and appropriate student engagement strategies, pacing, sequence, activities, materials, resources, technologies, and grouping to attend to every student's needs. Is able to model this element.

 

Indicator I-B.     Assessment: Uses a variety of informal and formal methods of assessments to measure student learning, growth, and understanding to develop differentiated and enhanced learning experiences and improve future instruction.

I-B. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

I-B-1. Variety of Assessment Methods

Administers only the assessments required by the school and/or measures only point-in-time student achievement.

May administer some informal and/or formal assessments to measure student learning but rarely measures student progress toward achieving state/local standards.

Designs and administers a variety of informal and formal methods and assessments, including common interim assessments, to measure each student's learning, growth, and progress toward achieving state/local standards.

Uses an integrated, comprehensive system of informal and formal assessments, including common interim assessments, to measure student learning, growth, and progress toward achieving state/local standards. Is able to model this element.

I-B-2. Adjustment to Practice

Makes few adjustments to practice based on formal and informal assessments.

May organize and analyze some assessment results but only occasionally adjusts practice or modifies future instruction based on the findings.

Organizes and analyzes results from a variety of assessments to determine progress toward intended outcomes and uses these findings to adjust practice and identify and/or implement appropriate differentiated interventions and enhancements for students.

Organizes and analyzes results from a comprehensive system of assessments to determine progress toward intended outcomes and frequently uses these findings to adjust practice and identify and/or implement appropriate differentiated interventions and enhancements for individuals and groups of students and appropriate modifications of lessons and units. Is able to model this element.

Indicator I-C.     Analysis: Analyzes data from assessments, draws conclusions, and shares them appropriately.

I-C. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

I-C-1. Analysis and Conclusions

Does not draw conclusions from student data beyond completing minimal requirements such as grading for report cards.

Draws conclusions from a limited analysis of student data to inform student grading and promotion decisions.

Individually and with colleagues, draws appropriate conclusions from a thorough analysis of a wide range of assessment data to improve student learning.

Individually and with colleagues, draws appropriate, actionable conclusions from a thorough analysis of a wide range of assessment data that improve short-and long-term instructional decisions. Is able to model this element.

I-C-2. Sharing Conclusions With Colleagues

Rarely shares with colleagues conclusions about student progress and/or rarely seeks feedback.

Only occasionally shares with colleagues conclusions about student progress and/or only occasionally seeks feedback from them about practices that will support improved student learning.

Regularly shares with appropriate colleagues (e.g., general education, special education, and English learner staff) conclusions about student progress and seeks feedback from them about instructional or assessment practices that will support improved student learning.

Establishes and implements a schedule and plan for regularly sharing with all appropriate colleagues conclusions and insights about student progress. Seeks and applies feedback from them about practices that will support improved student learning. Is able to model this element.

I-C-3. Sharing Conclusions With Students

Provides little or no feedback on student performance except through grades or report of task completion, or provides inappropriate feedback that does not support students to improve their performance.

Provides some feedback about performance beyond grades but rarely shares strategies for students to improve their performance toward objectives.

Based on assessment results, provides descriptive feedback and engages students and families in constructive conversation that focuses on how students can improve their performance.

Establishes early, constructive feedback loops with students and families that create a dialogue about performance, progress, and improvement. Is able to model this element.

Standard II: Teaching All Students. The teacher promotes the learning and growth of all students through instructional practices that establish high expectations, create a safe and effective classroom environment, and demonstrate cultural proficiency.

Indicator II-A.     Instruction: Uses instructional practices that reflect high expectations regarding content and quality of effort and work; engage all students; and are personalized to accommodate diverse learning styles, needs, interests, and levels of readiness.

II-A. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

II-A-1. Quality of Effort and Work

Establishes no or low expectations around quality of work and effort and/or offers few supports for students to produce quality work or effort.

May states high expectations for quality and effort, but provides few exemplars and rubrics, limited guided practice, and/or few other supports to help students know what is expected of them; may establish inappropriately low expectations for quality and effort.

Consistently defines high expectations for the quality of student work and the perseverance and effort required to produce it; often provides exemplars, rubrics, and guided practice.

Consistently defines high expectations for quality work and effort and effectively supports students to set high expectations for each other to persevere and produce high-quality work. Is able to model this element.

II-A-2. Student Engagement

Uses instructional practices that leave most students uninvolved and/or passive participants.

Uses instructional practices that motivate and engage some students but leave others uninvolved and/or passive participants.

Consistently uses instructional practices that are likely to motivate and engage most students during the lesson.

Consistently uses instructional practices that typically motivate and engage most students both during the lesson and during independent work and home work. Is able to model this element.

II-A-3. Meeting Diverse Needs

Uses limited and/or inappropriate practices to accommodate differences.

May use some appropriate practices to accommodate differences, but fails to address an adequate range of differences.

Uses appropriate practices, including tiered instruction and scaffolds, to accommodate differences in learning styles, needs, interests, and levels of readiness, including those of students with disabilities and English learners.

Uses a varied repertoire of practices to create structured opportunities for each student to meet or exceed state standards/local curriculum and behavioral expectations. Is able to model this element.

Indicator II-B.     Learning Environment: Creates and maintains a safe and collaborative learning environment that motivates students to take academic risks, challenge themselves, and claim ownership of their learning.

II-B. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

II-B-1. Safe Learning Environment

Maintains a physical environment that is unsafe or does not support student learning. Uses inappropriate or ineffective rituals, routines, and/or responses to reinforce positive behavior or respond to behaviors that interfere with students' learning.

May create and maintain a safe physical environment but inconsistently maintains rituals, routines, and responses needed to prevent and/or stop behaviors that interfere with all students' learning.

Uses rituals, routines, and appropriate responses that create and maintain a safe physical and intellectual environment where students take academic risks and most behaviors that interfere with learning are prevented.

Uses rituals, routines, and proactive responses that create and maintain a safe physical and intellectual environment where students take academic risks and play an active role— individually and collectively—in preventing behaviors that interfere with learning. Is able to model this element.

II-B-2. Collaborative Learning Environment

Makes little effort to teach interpersonal, group, and communication skills or facilitate student work in groups, or such attempts are ineffective.

Teaches some interpersonal, group, and communication skills and provides some opportunities for students to work in groups.

Develops students' interpersonal, group, and communication skills and provides opportunities for students to learn in groups.

Teaches and reinforces interpersonal, group, and communication skills so that students seek out their peers as resources. Is able to model this practice.

II-B-3. Student Motivation

Directs all learning experiences, providing few, if any, opportunities for students to take academic risks or challenge themselves to learn.

Creates some learning experiences that guide students to identify needs, ask for support, and challenge themselves to take academic risks.

Consistently creates learning experiences that guide students to identify their strengths, interests, and needs; ask for support when appropriate; take academic risks; and challenge themselves to learn.

Consistently supports students to identify strengths, interests, and needs; ask for support; take risks; challenge themselves; set learning goals; and monitor their own progress. Models these skills for colleagues.

Indicator II-C.     Cultural Proficiency: Actively creates and maintains an environment in which students' diverse backgrounds, identities, strengths, and challenges are respected.

II-C. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

II-C-1. Respects Differences

Establishes an environment in which students demonstrate limited respect for individual differences.

Establishes an environment in which students generally demonstrate respect for individual differences

Consistently uses strategies and practices that are likely to enable students to demonstrate respect for and affirm their own and others' differences related to background, identity, language, strengths, and challenges.

Establishes an environment in which students respect and affirm their own and others' differences and are supported to share and explore differences and similarities related to background, identity, language, strengths, and challenges. Is able to model this practice.

II-C-2. Maintains Respectful Environment

Minimizes or ignores conflicts and/or responds in inappropriate ways.

Anticipates and responds appropriately to some conflicts or misunderstandings but ignores and/or minimizes others.

Anticipates and responds appropriately to conflicts or misunderstandings arising from differences in backgrounds, languages, and identities.

Anticipates and responds appropriately to conflicts or misunderstandings arising from differences in backgrounds, languages, and identities in ways that lead students to be able to do the same independently. Is able to model this practice.

Indicator II-D.     Expectations: Plans and implements lessons that set clear and high expectations and also make knowledge accessible for all students.

II-D. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

II-D-1. Clear Expectations

Does not make specific academic and behavior expectations clear to students.

May announce and post classroom academic and behavior rules and consequences, but inconsistently or ineffectively enforces them.

Clearly communicates and consistently enforces specific standards for student work, effort, and behavior.

Clearly communicates and consistently enforces specific standards for student work, effort, and behavior so that most students are able to describe them and take ownership of meeting them. Is able to model this element.

II-D-2. High Expectations

Gives up on some students or communicates that some cannot master challenging material.

May tell students that the subject or assignment is challenging and that they need to work hard but does little to counteract student misconceptions about innate ability.

Effectively models and reinforces ways that students can master challenging material through effective effort, rather than having to depend on innate ability.

Effectively models and reinforces ways that students can consistently master challenging material through effective effort. Successfully challenges students' misconceptions about innate ability. Is able to model this element.

II-D-3. Access to Knowledge

Rarely adapts instruction, materials, and assessments to make challenging material accessible to all students.

Occasionally adapts instruction, materials, and assessments to make challenging material accessible to all students.

Consistently adapts instruction, materials, and assessments to make challenging material accessible to all students, including English learners and students with disabilities.

Individually and with colleagues, consistently adapts instruction, materials, and assessments to make challenging material accessible to all students, including English learners and students with disabilities. Is able to model this element.

Standard III: Family and Community Engagement. The teacher promotes the learning and growth of all students through effective partnerships with families, caregivers, community members, and organizations.

Indicator III-A.    Engagement: Welcomes and encourages every family to become active participants in the classroom and school community.

III-A. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

III-A-1. Parent/Family Engagement

Does not welcome families to become participants in the classroom and school community or actively discourages their participation.

Makes limited attempts to involve families in school and/or classroom activities, meetings, and planning.

Uses a variety of strategies to support every family to participate actively and appropriately in the classroom and school community.

Successfully engages most families and sustains their active and appropriate participation in the classroom and school community. Is able to model this element.

Indicator III-B.     Collaboration: Collaborates with families to create and implement strategies for supporting student learning and development both at home and at school.

Ill-B. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

III-B-1. Learning Expectations

Does not inform parents about learning or behavior expectations.

Sends home only a list of classroom rules and the learning outline or syllabus for the year.

Consistently provides parents with clear, user-friendly expectations for student learning and behavior.

Successfully conveys to most parents student learning and behavior expectations. Is able to model this element.

III-B-2. Curriculum Support

Rarely, if ever, communicates with parents on ways to support children at home or at school.

Sends home occasional suggestions on how parents can support children at home or at school.

Regularly updates parents on curriculum throughout the year and suggests strategies for supporting learning at school and home, including appropriate adaptation for students with disabilities or limited English proficiency.

Successfully prompts most families to use one or more of the strategies suggested for supporting learning at school and home and seeks out evidence of their impact. Is able to model this element.

Indicator III-C. Communication: Engages in regular, two-way, and culturally proficient communication with families about student learning and performance.

III-C. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

III-C-1. Two-Way Communication

Rarely communicates with families except through report cards; rarely solicits or responds promptly and carefully to communications from families.

Relies primarily on newsletters and other one-way media and usually responds promptly to communications from families.

Regularly uses two-way communication with families about student performance and learning and responds promptly and carefully to communications from families.

Regularly uses a two-way system that supports frequent, proactive, and personalized communication with families about student performance and learning. Is able to model this element.

III-C-2. Culturally Proficient Communication

Makes few attempts to respond to different family cultural norms and/or responds inappropriately or disrespectfully.

May communicate respectfully and make efforts to take into account different families' home language, culture, and values, but does so inconsistently or does not demonstrate understanding and sensitivity to the differences.

Always communicates respectfully with families and demonstrates understanding of and sensitivity to different families' home language, culture, and values.

Always communicates respectfully with families and demonstrates understanding and appreciation of different families' home language, culture, and values. Is able to model this element.

Standard IV: Professional Culture. The teacher promotes the learning and growth of all students through ethical, culturally proficient, skilled, and collaborative practice.

Indicator IV-A.     Reflection: Demonstrates the capacity to reflect on and improve the educator's own practice, using informal means as well as meetings with teams and work groups to gather information, analyze data, examine issues, set meaningful goals, and develop new approaches in order to improve teaching and learning.

IV-A. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-A-1. Reflective Practice

Demonstrates limited reflection on practice and/or use of insights gained to improve practice.

May reflect on the effectiveness of lessons/ units and interactions with students but not with colleagues and/or rarely uses insights to improve practice.

Regularly reflects on the effectiveness of lessons, units, and interactions with students, both individually and with colleagues, and uses insights gained to improve practice and student learning.

Regularly reflects on the effectiveness of lessons, units, and interactions with students, both individually and with colleagues; and uses and shares with colleagues, insights gained to improve practice and student learning. Is able to model this element.

IV-A-2. Goal Setting

Generally, participates passively in the goal-setting process and/or proposes goals that are vague or easy to reach.

Proposes goals that are sometimes vague or easy to achieve and/or bases goals on a limited self-assessment and analysis of student learning data.

Proposes challenging, measurable professional practice, team, and student learning goals that are based on thorough self-assessment and analysis of student learning data.

Individually and with colleagues builds capacity to propose and monitor challenging, measurable goals based on thorough self-assessment and analysis of student learning data. Is able to model this element.

Indicator IV-B.     Professional Growth: Actively pursues professional development and learning opportunities to improve quality of practice or build the expertise and experience to assume different instructional and leadership roles.

IV-B. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-B-1. Professional Learning and Growth

Participates in few, if any, professional development and learning opportunities to improve practice and/or applies little new learning to practice.

Participates only in required professional development activities and/or inconsistently or inappropriately applies new learning to improve practice.

Consistently seeks out and applies, when appropriate, ideas for improving practice from supervisors, colleagues, professional development activities, and other resources to gain expertise and/or assume different instruction and leadership responsibilities.

Consistently seeks out professional development and learning opportunities that improve practice and build expertise of self and other educators in instruction and leadership. Is able to model this element.

Indicator IV-C.     Collaboration: Collaborates effectively with colleagues on a wide range of tasks.

IV-C. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-C-1. Professional Collaboration

Rarely and/or ineffectively collaborates with colleagues; conversations often lack focus on improving student learning.

Does not consistently collaborate with colleagues in ways that support productive team effort.

Consistently and effectively collaborates with colleagues in such work as developing standards-based units, examining student work, analyzing student performance, and planning appropriate intervention.

Supports colleagues to collaborate in areas such as developing standards-based units, examining student work, analyzing student performance, and planning appropriate intervention. Is able to model this element.

Indicator IV-D.     Decision-Making: Becomes involved in schoolwide decision making, and takes an active role in school improvement planning.

IV-D. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-D-1. Decision-Making

Participates in planning and decision making at the school, department, and/or grade level only when asked and rarely contributes relevant ideas or expertise.

May participate in planning and decision making at the school, department, and/or grade level but rarely contributes relevant ideas or expertise.

Consistently contributes relevant ideas and expertise to planning and decision making at the school, department, and/or grade level.

I In planning and decision-making at the school, department, and/or grade level, consistently contributes ideas and expertise that are critical to school improvement efforts. Is able to model this element.

Indicator IV-E.     Shared Responsibility: Shares responsibility for the performance of all students within the school.

IV-E. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-E-1. Shared Responsibility

Rarely reinforces school wide behavior and learning expectations for all students and/or makes a limited contribution to their learning by rarely sharing responsibility for meeting their needs.

Within and beyond the classroom, inconsistently reinforces school wide behavior and learning expectations for all students, and/or makes a limited contribution to their learning by inconsistently sharing responsibility for meeting their needs.

Within and beyond the classroom, consistently reinforces school wide behavior and learning expectations for all students, and contributes to their learning by sharing responsibility for meeting their needs.

Individually and with colleagues develops strategies and actions that contribute to the learning and productive behavior of all students at the school. Is able to model this element.

Indicator IV-F.     Professional Responsibilities: Is ethical and reliable, and meets routine responsibilities consistently.

IV-F. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-F-1. Judgment

Demonstrates poor judgment and/or discloses confidential student information inappropriately.

Sometimes demonstrates questionable judgment and/or inadvertently shares confidential information.

Demonstrates sound judgment reflecting integrity, honesty, fairness, and trustworthiness and protects student confidentiality appropriately.

Demonstrates sound judgment and acts appropriately to protect student confidentiality, rights and safety. Is able to model this element.

IV-F-2. Reliability & Responsibility

Frequently misses or is late to assignments, makes errors in records, and/or misses paperwork deadlines; frequently late or absent.

Occasionally misses or is late to assignments, completes work late, and/or makes errors in records, and is rarely late or absent from school-

Consistently fulfills professional responsibilities; is consistently punctual and reliable with paperwork, duties, and assignments; and is rarely late.

Consistently fulfills all professional responsibilities to high standards. Is able to model this element.

Appendix D SISP: Refer to Separate Attachment Appendix E: Refer to Separate Attachment

Appendix E: Student Impact Rating and District-Determined Measures

Section 22 - Rating of Educator Impact on Student Learning (Student Impact Rating)

Table of Contents

A.   Basis of the Student Impact Rating

B.    Identifying and Selecting District-Determined Measures

C.   Determining Educator Impact for Each DDM

D.   Determining a Student Impact Rating

E.    Intersection between the Summative Performance Rating and the Student Impact Rating

F.    Initial Reporting of Student Impact Ratings

22)       Rating of Educator Impact on Student Learning (Student Impact Rating)

A)        Basis of the Student Impact Rating

i.          The following student performance measures shall be the basis for determining an educator's impact on student learning, growth, and achievement.

(a)        Statewide growth measure(s),

(1st)      Where available, statewide growth measures must be selected each year as one of the measures used to determine the educator's Student Impact Rating.

(2nd)     Statewide growth measures include the MCAS Student Growth Percentile, or its equivalent, and ACCESS for ELLs gain score.

(b)         District-Determined Measures (DDMs) of student learning, growth, or achievement

B)          Identifying and Selecting District-Determined Measures

i.            A DDMs Working Group representing teachers and administrators shall be established to identify and select DDMs.

(a)         The Working Group shall be co-chaired by the president of the bargaining unit or his/her designee and the Superintendent or his/her designee.

(b)         The parties shall endeavor to provide, to the extent practicable, representation of educators from a variety of grade levels and disciplines.

(c)         Participating in the continuous improvement of the district's DDMs.

ii.           DDM Selection Criteria

(a)          DDMs may consist of direct or indirect measures.

(1st)       A direct measure assesses student growth in a specific content area or domain of social-emotional or behavioral learning over time.

(i)           For all classroom educators, at least one measure in each year that will be used to determine an educator's Student Impact Rating must be a direct measure.

(ii)          Direct measures include, but are not limited to, criterion referenced or norm referenced measures such as: formative, interim and unit pre-and post-assessments in specific subjects, assessments of growth based on performances and/or portfolios of student work judged against common scoring rubrics, and mid-year and end-of-course examinations.

(2nd)       Indirect measures do not measure student growth in a specific content area or domain of social-emotional or behavioral learning but do measure the consequences of that learning.

(i)            Indirect measures include, but are not limited to, changes in: promotion and graduation rates, attendance and tardiness rates, rigorous course-taking pattern rates, college course matriculation and course remediation rates, discipline referral and other behavior rates, and other measures of student engagement and progress.

(b)           DDMs must be comparable across grade or subject level district-wide.

(c)           DDMs must include consistent, transparent scoring processes that establish clear parameters for what constitutes high, moderate, and low student growth.

(d)           DDMs must be aligned to the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks, Massachusetts Vocational Technical Education Frameworks, or other relevant Frameworks.

iii.           Process for Selecting DDMs

(a)           The DDMs Working Group shall provide a written recommendation to the Superintendent regarding its work, including 22.B.ii.c, above.

(b)            If the superintendent declines to accept the recommendations from the DDMs Working Group, the superintendent or the collective bargaining representative may request an expedited resolution process as follows:

(1st)         The school district or the collective bargaining representative may file a petition seeking expedited resolution with the Commissioner of Elementary and Secondary Education.

(2nd)        The Commissioner shall forward to the parties a list of three hearing officers selected by the Commissioner for their knowledge and expertise in curriculum and/or assessment.

(3rd)         The Superintendent and the collective bargaining representative within three days of receipt of the list from the Commissioner shall have the right to strike one of the three hearing officers' names if they are unable to agree upon a single hearing officer among the three.

(4th)          The hearing officer shall render a final decision that advances the goals of encouraging innovation in teaching and of holding educators accountable for improving student performance.

(c)              Educators must be informed of the DDMs that will be used to determine their Student Impact Ratings no later than the end of the fourth week of school.

(d)             Districts shall arrange professional development for all educators, principals, and other evaluators that outlines the components of the Student Impact Rating and prepares educators to administer DDMs. The district through the superintendent shall determine the type and quality of professional development based on guidance provided by ESE. Professional development topics may include, but not be limited to, an overview of DDMs and the Student Impact Rating, the district's DDM implementation and scoring plans, and the process for reviewing and confirming student rosters.

(e)

C)              Determining Educator Impact for Each DDM

i.                The evaluator will meet with the educator annually to discuss the educator's students' growth scores on each DDM for that school year. For each DDM, the evaluator will consult with the educator and then will determine whether in general, the educator's students demonstrated high, moderate, or low growth in comparison to the parameters the district has set for high, moderate, and low growth for the specific DDM. See Section 22.B.iii.c. The evaluator's determination will result in a designation of high, moderate, or low impact for the educator for each DDM. Based on this determination, and in support of the continuous growth and development of the educator, the evaluator may recommend modifications to the educator's instructional practice.

ii.               Educators shall have an opportunity to review and confirm the roster of students whose scores will be used in the determination of their impact on student growth for each DDM.

(a)              For full-year or fall semester courses, the DDM results from students who are not enrolled in the grade or course by October 1st or do not remain enrolled through the final date the DDM is administered shall not be used in the determination of an educator's impact on student growth.

(b)              For spring semester courses, the DDM results from students who are not enrolled in the grade or course by the end of the fourth week of the semester or do not remain enrolled through the final date the DDM is administered shall not be used in the determination of an educator's impact on student growth.

(c)              DDM results from students who are not present for instruction or education services for at least 90 percent of the allotted instructional or service time shall not be used in the determination of an educator's impact on student growth.

D)              Determining a Student Impact Rating

i.                The evaluator shall use his/her professional judgment to determine whether an educator is having a high, moderate, or low impact on student learning. The evaluator will consider the designations of impact (high, moderate, or low) from at least two measures (a statewide growth measure must be used as one measure, where available) in each of at least two years and will apply professional judgment to those designations in order to establish trends and patterns in student learning, growth, and achievement, before determining the educator's Student Impact Rating. The evaluator's professional judgment may include, but is not limited to, consideration of the educator's student population and specific learning context.

(a)              A rating of high indicates that the educator's students demonstrated significantly higher than one year's growth relative to academic peers in the grade or subject.

(b)              A rating of moderate indicates that the educator's students demonstrated one year's growth relative to academic peers in the grade or subject.

(c)              A rating of low indicates that the educator's students demonstrated significantly lower than one year's student learning growth relative to academic peers in the grade or subject.

ii.               The evaluator shall meet with the educator rated low to discuss the Student Impact Rating. The evaluator may meet with the educator rated moderate or high to discuss the Student Impact Rating, if either the educator or the evaluator requests such a meeting.

E)               Intersection between the Summative Performance Rating and the Student Impact Rating

i.                An educator's Summative Performance Rating is a rating of educator practice and remains independent from the educator's Student Impact Rating, which is a rating of impact on student learning, growth, and achievement.

ii.               Educators with PTS whose overall Summative Performance Rating is exemplary and whose Student Impact Rating is moderate or high shall be recognized and rewarded with leadership roles, promotions, additional compensation public commendation, or other acknowledgement as determined by the district through collective bargaining where applicable. See Section 21.C.

iii.              Educators with PTS whose overall Summative Performance Rating is proficient and whose Student Impact Rating is moderate or high may be eligible for additional roles, responsibilities, and compensation, as determined by the district through collective bargaining where applicable.

iv.               Educators with PTS whose overall Summative Performance Rating is exemplary or proficient and whose Student Impact Rating is moderate or high shall be placed on a two-year self-directed growth plan. See Section 17.A.

v.                Educators with PTS whose overall Summative Performance Rating is exemplary or proficient and whose Student Impact Rating is low shall be placed on a one-year self-directed growth plan. See Section 17.B.

(a)               In such cases, the evaluator's supervisor shall discuss and review the Summative Performance Rating with the evaluator and the supervisor shall confirm or revise the educator's rating. See Section 14.D.

(b)              The educator and the evaluator shall analyze the discrepancy between the Summative Performance Rating and Student Impact Rating to seek to determine the cause of the discrepancy.

(c)               The Educator Plan may include a goal related to examining elements of practice that may be contributing to low impact.

vi.                Evaluators shall use evidence of educator performance and impact on student learning, growth, and achievement in the goal setting and educator plan development processes, based on the educator's self-assessment and other sources that the evaluator shares with the educator.

F)                 Initial Reporting of Student Impact Ratings

i.                  The district shall implement DDMs and collect the first year of Student Impact Rating data during the 2014 - 15 school year.

ii.                 The district shall implement DDMs and collect the second year of Student Impact Rating data during the 2015 - 16 school year.

iii.                 Initial Student Impact Ratings shall be determined based on trends and patterns following the 2015 - 16 school year and shall be reported to ESE.

Massachusetts Model System for Educator Evaluation

Part III: Guide to Rubrics and Model Rubrics

for Superintendent, Administrator, and Teacher

Appendix D. Specialized Instructional Support Personnel Rubric

March 2012

Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

75 Pleasant Street, Malden, MA 02148-4906

Phone 781-338-3000 TTY: N.E.T. Relay 800-439-2370

www.doe.mass.edu

Guide to Specialized Instructional Support Personnel (SISP) Rubric

Rubrics - defined in the regulations as “scoring tool[s] that describe characteristics of practice or artifacts at different levels of performance” (603 CMR 35.02) - are a critical component of the Massachusetts educator evaluation framework and are required for every educator. Rubrics are designed to help educators and evaluators (1) develop a consistent, shared understanding of what proficient performance looks like in practice, (2) develop a common terminology and structure to organize evidence, and (3) make informed professional judgments about formative and summative performance ratings on each Standard and overall. This appendix contains the ESE Model “SISP” Rubric.

Structure of the Specialized Instructional Support Personnel (SISP) Rubric

●         Standards: Standards are the broad categories of knowledge, skills, and performance of effective practice detailed in the regulations. There are four Standards for teachers: Curriculum, Planning, and Assessment; Teaching All Students; Family and Community Engagement; and Professional Culture.

●         Indicators: Indicators, also detailed in the regulations, describe specific knowledge, skills, and performance for each Standard. For example, there are three Indicators in Standard I of the SISP rubric: Curriculum and Planning; Assessment; and Analysis.

●         Elements: The elements are more specific descriptions of actions and behaviors related to each Indicator. The elements further break down the Indicators into more specific aspects of educator practice and provide an opportunity for evaluators to offer detailed feedback that serves as a roadmap for improvement.

●         Descriptors: Performance descriptors are observable and measurable statements of educator actions and behaviors aligned to each element and serve as the basis for identifying the level of teaching or administrative performance in one of four categories: Unsatisfactory, Needs Improvement, Proficient, or Exemplary.

Use of the Specialized Instructional Support Personnel (SISP) Rubric

This rubric describes practice that is common across educators in professional support roles such as school counselors, school psychologists, school nurses, and others defined in the recognition clause of the appropriate collective bargaining agreement. It is intended to be used throughout the 5 step evaluation cycle for educators who provide direct services such as education, therapy, counseling, assessment, and diagnosis to a caseload of students, as well as educators who may provide indirect support to students through consultation to and collaboration with teachers, administrators, and other colleagues.

The roles and responsibilities of educators to whom this rubric will be applied will vary. ESE encourages educators and evaluators to use the rubric strategically by discussing and agreeing upon certain Indicators and Elements that should be high priorities according to that educator’s role and responsibilities as well as his/her professional practice and student learning needs. There are a variety of ways to emphasize these components throughout the evaluation cycle. For example, high priority Indicators and/or elements can be analyzed in greater depth during self-assessment, targeted during goal setting, a focus for more comprehensive evidence collection, or all of the above. However, the expectation is that by the end of the evaluation cycle, educators and evaluators have gathered and shared a reasonable amount of evidence on every Indicator to support a rating for each Standard.

Specialized Instructional Support Personnel (SISP) Rubric At-A-Glance

Standard I: Curriculum, Planning, and Assessment

Standard II: Teaching All Students

Standard III: Family and Community Engagement

Standard IV: Professional Culture

A. Curriculum and Planning Indicator

A. Instruction Indicator

A. Engagement Indicator

A. Reflection Indicator

1. Professional Knowledge

1. Quality of Effort and Work

1. Parent/Family Engagement

1. Reflective Practice

2. Child and Adolescent Development

2. Student Engagement

 

2. Goal Setting

3. Plan Development

3. Meeting Diverse Needs

 

 

4. Well-Structured Lessons

 

 

 

B. Assessment Indicator

B. Learning Environment Indicator

B. Collaboration Indicator

B. Professional Growth Indicator

1. Variety of Assessment Methods

1. Safe Learning Environment

1. Learning Expectations

1. Professional Learning and Growth

2. Adjustments to Practice

2. Collaborative Learning Environment

2. Student Support

 

 

3. Student Motivation

 

 

C. Analysis Indicator

C. Cultural Proficiency Indicator

C. Communication Indicator

C. Collaboration Indicator

1. Analysis and Conclusions

1. Respects Differences

1. Two-Way Communication

1. Professional Collaboration

2. Sharing Conclusions With Colleagues

2. Maintains Respectful Environment

2. Culturally Proficient Communication

2. Consultation

3. Sharing Conclusions With Students and Families

 

 

 

 

D. Expectations Indicator

 

D. Decision-Making Indicator

 

1. Clear Expectations

 

1. Decision-making

 

2. High Expectations

 

 

 

3. Access to Knowledge

 

E. Shared Responsibility Indicator

 

 

 

1. Shared Responsibility

 

 

 

F. Professional Responsibilities Indicator

 

 

 

1. Judgment

 

 

 

2. Reliability and Responsibility

Note: The SISP rubric is designed to have close alignment with the teacher rubric to emphasize commonalities across educators. Please see Appendix E addressing “Role-Specific Indicators” for additional guidance and samples of how to strategically supplement this rubric to further differentiate by role.

How to reference parts of the rubric:

Indicator terminology: under the “Teaching All StudentsStandard (II), the” Instruction Indicator(A) can be referred to as Indicator II-A

Element terminology: under the Instruction Indicator (A), the Student Engagement Element (2) can be referred to as Element II-A-2

Standards and Indicators of Effective Teaching Practice:

Specialized Instructional Support Personnel Rubric

Standard I: Curriculum, Planning, and Assessment. promotes the learning and growth of all students by providing high-quality and coherent instruction, designing and administering authentic and meaningful student assessments, analyzing student performance and growth data, using this data to improve instruction, providing students with constructive feedback on an ongoing basis, and continuously refining learning objectives.

Indicator I-A.     Curriculum and Planning: Has strong knowledge specific to subject matter and/or professional responsibility, has a good grasp of child development and how students learn, and designs effective and rigorous plans for support consisting of well-structured lessons with measurable outcomes.

I-A. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

I-A-1. Professional Knowledge

Demonstrates limited professional knowledge; relies heavily on outdated practices as opposed to current practices supported by research. Rarely engages students in academic, behavioral, and social/emotional learning experiences through the use of educational and/or clinical practices.

Demonstrates factual knowledge of the professional content and delivery and sometimes applies it to engage students in academic, behavioral, and social/emotional learning experiences through the use of educational and/or clinical practices.

Demonstrates sound knowledge and understanding of professional content and delivery by consistently engaging students in academic, behavioral, and social/emotional learning experiences through the use of educational and/or clinical practices that enable students to acquire knowledge and skills.

Demonstrates mastery of professional content and its delivery by engaging all students in academic, behavioral, and social/emotional learning experiences, through the use of educational and/or clinical practices, that enable students to synthesize knowledge and skills. Is able to model this element.

I-A-2. Child and Adolescent Development

Demonstrates little or no knowledge of child and adolescent development; typically develops one learning experience, and/or type of support or assistance for all students that does not adequately address intended outcomes.

Demonstrates general knowledge of child and adolescent development but does not apply this knowledge when providing differentiated learning experiences, support, and/or assistance that would enable all students—as opposed to just some— to move toward meeting intended outcomes.

Demonstrates knowledge of students’ developmental levels and the different ways these students learn or behave by providing differentiated learning experiences, support, and/or assistance that enable all students to progress toward meeting intended outcomes.

Demonstrates expert knowledge of the developmental levels of individual students and students in the grade or subject more generally and uses this knowledge to differentiate and expand learning experiences, supports, and/or types of assistance, enabling all students to make significant progress toward meeting stated outcomes. Is able to model this element.

I-A-3 Plan Development1

Develops or contributes to the development of plans that are not timely and/or not tailored to the needs of individual students; or, plans do not include appropriate supports or measurable outcomes that would enable students to meet the goals and objectives of the plan.

Develops or contributes to the timely development of plans that respond to some but not all relevant individual student needs, and/or plans that lack sufficient measurable outcomes or supports that enable students to meet all goals and objectives of the plan.

Develops or contributes to the timely development of well-structured plans with measurable outcomes that respond to all relevant individual student needs, and include supports that enable students to meet the goals or objectives of the plan.

Develops or contributes to the timely development of comprehensive, well-structured plans with measurable outcomes that respond to all relevant individual student needs, are coordinated with other plans relevant to those students, and include supports that enable students to meet all goals or objectives of the plan. Is able to model this element.

I-A-4. Well-Structured Lessons

Develops lessons (which may include individual and group activities or sessions) with inappropriate student engagement strategies, pacing, sequence, activities, materials, resources, and/or grouping.

Develops lessons (which may include individual and group activities or sessions) with only some elements of appropriate student engagement strategies, pacing, sequence, activities, materials, resources, and grouping.

Develops well-structured lessons (which may include individual and group activities or sessions) with challenging, measurable objectives and appropriate student engagement strategies, pacing, sequence, activities, materials, resources, technologies, and grouping.

Develops well-structured and highly engaging lessons (which may include individual and group activities and sessions) with challenging, measurable objectives and appropriate student engagement strategies, pacing, sequence, activities, materials, resources, technologies, and grouping to attend to every student’s needs. Is able to model this element.

____________________________________________________________________________________

1 “Plan” is used throughout this document to refer to a variety of plans, including but not limited to: lesson plans, unit plans, Individualized Education Programs (IEPs), Individualized Health Care Plans (IHCPs), Career Plans, and 504 Plans. The type of plan that an educator is responsible for depends on the educator being evaluated; both the educator and evaluator should understand and agree upon the definition relevant to the educator’s role.

____________________________________________________________________________________

Indicator I-B. Assessment: Uses a variety of informal and formal methods of assessments to measure student learning, growth, and understanding to develop differentiated and enhanced learning experiences and improve future instruction.

I-B. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

I-B-1. Variety of Assessment Methods

Administers assessments and/or collects only the data required by the school and/or measures only point-in-time student achievement or development.

May design and administer assessments and/or collect some data to measure student learning, growth, or development, but uses a limited range of methods.

Designs and administers assessments and/or collects data to measure student learning, growth, and/or development through a variety of methods, including informal and formal assessments and common interim assessments where applicable.

Uses an integrated, comprehensive assessment system, including informal and formal assessment methods and common interim assessments where applicable, to measure student learning, growth, and development. Is able to model this element.

I-B-2. Adjustment to Practice

Makes few adjustments to practice by identifying and/or implementing appropriate differentiated interventions, supports, and programs based on formal and informal assessments.

May organize and analyze some assessment results but only occasionally adjusts practice and identifies and/or implements appropriate differentiated interventions, supports, and programs for students.

Organizes and analyzes results from a variety of assessments to determine progress toward intended outcomes and uses these findings to adjust practice and identify and/or implement appropriate differentiated interventions, supports, and programs for students.

Organizes and analyzes results from a comprehensive system of assessments to determine progress toward intended outcomes and frequently uses these findings to adjust practice and identify and/or implement appropriate differentiated interventions, supports, or programs for individuals and groups of students and appropriate modifications of plans. Is able to model this element.

Indicator I-C.     Analysis: Analyzes data from assessments, draws conclusions, and shares them appropriately.

I-C. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

I-C-1. Analysis and Conclusions

Does not analyze data and/or draw conclusions from data beyond completing minimal requirements.

Draws conclusions from a limited analysis of data to inform student learning, growth, and development.

Individually and with colleagues, draws appropriate conclusions about programs, plans, and practices from a thorough analysis of a wide range of data to improve student learning, growth, and development.

Individually and with colleagues, draws appropriate, actionable conclusions about programs, plans, and practices from a thorough analysis of a wide range of data that improve short-and long-term planning decisions. Is able to model this element.

I-C-2. Sharing Conclusions With Colleagues

Rarely shares with colleagues conclusions about student progress and/or rarely seeks feedback from them about practices that will support improved student learning and/or development.

Only occasionally shares with colleagues conclusions about student progress and/or seeks feedback from them about practices that will support improved student learning and/or development.

Regularly shares with appropriate colleagues (e.g., classroom teachers, administrators, and professional support personnel) conclusions about student progress and seeks feedback from them about practices that will support improved student learning and/or development.

Establishes and implements a schedule and plan for regularly sharing with all appropriate colleagues (e.g., classroom teachers, administrators, and professional support personnel) conclusions and insights about student progress. Seeks and applies feedback from them about practices that will support improved student learning and/or development. Is able to model this element.

I-C-3. Sharing Conclusions With Students and Families

Provides little or no feedback on student growth or progress except through minimally required reporting or provides inappropriate feedback that does not support students to grow and improve.

Provides some feedback about student growth or progress beyond required reports but rarely shares strategies for students to grow and improve.

Based on assessment results and/or other data, provides descriptive feedback and engages students and families in constructive conversation that focuses on student growth and improvement.

Establishes early, constructive feedback loops with students and families that create a dialogue about student growth, progress, and improvement. Is able to model this element.

Standard II: Teaching All Students. Promotes the learning and growth of all students through instructional practices that establish high expectations, create a safe and effective classroom environment, and demonstrate cultural proficiency.

Indicator II-A.     Instruction: Uses instructional and clinical practices that reflect high expectations regarding content and quality of effort and work; engage all students; and are personalized to accommodate diverse learning styles, needs, interests, and levels of readiness.

II-A. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

II-A-1. Quality of Effort and Work

Establishes no or low expectations for student work and behavior and/or offers few supports to help students know what is expected of them.

May state high expectations for student work and behavior, but provides few exemplars and rubrics, or limited guided practice, and/or few other supports to help students know what is expected of them.

Consistently defines high expectations for student work and behavior, and the perseverance and effort required to produce it; often provides exemplars, rubrics, or guided practice, and/or models appropriate behaviors.

Consistently defines high expectations for student work and behavior and effectively supports students to set high expectations for each other to persevere and produce high-quality work. Is able to model this element.

II-A-2. Student Engagement

Uses instructional and/or clinical practices that leave most students uninvolved and/or passive.

Uses instructional and/or clinical practices that motivate and engage some students but leave others uninvolved and/or passive.

Consistently uses instructional and clinical practices that are likely to motivate and engage most students during the lesson, activity, or session.

Consistently uses instructional and clinical practices that typically motivate and engage most students during the lesson, activity, or session, and during independent work. Is able to model this element.

II-A-3. Meeting Diverse Needs

Uses limited and/or inappropriate practices and/or supports to accommodate differences.

May use some appropriate practices and/or supports to accommodate differences, but fails to address an adequate range of differences.

Uses appropriate practices, including tiered instruction, scaffolds, and other supports, to accommodate differences in learning styles, needs, interests, and levels of readiness, including those of students with disabilities and English learners.

Uses a varied repertoire of practices and/or supports to create structured opportunities for each student to meet or exceed expectations for growth and development. Is able to model this element.

Indicator II-B.     Learning Environment: Creates and maintains a safe and collaborative learning environment that motivates students to take academic risks, challenge themselves, and claim ownership of their learning.

II-B. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

II-B-1. Safe Learning Environment

Maintains a physical environment that is unsafe or does not support student learning. Uses inappropriate or ineffective rituals, routines, and/or responses to reinforce positive behavior or respond to behaviors that interfere with students’ learning.

May create and maintain a safe physical environment but inconsistently maintains rituals, routines, and responses needed to prevent and/or stop behaviors that interfere with all students’ learning.

Uses rituals, routines, and appropriate responses that create and maintain a safe physical and intellectual environment where students take academic risks and most behaviors that interfere with learning are prevented.

Uses rituals, routines, and proactive responses that create and maintain a safe physical and intellectual environment where students take academic risks and play an active role—individually and collectively—in preventing behaviors that interfere with learning. Is able to model this element.

II-B-2. Collaborative Learning Environment

Makes little effort to teach interpersonal, group, and communication skills or facilitate student work in groups, or such attempts are ineffective.

Teaches some interpersonal, group, and communication skills and provides some opportunities for students to work in groups.

Develops students’ interpersonal, group, and communication skills and provides opportunities for students to learn in groups with diverse peers.

Teaches and reinforces interpersonal, group, and communication skills so that students seek out their peers as resources. Is able to model this practice.

II-B-2. Student Motivation

Directs all learning experiences, providing few, if any, opportunities for students to take risks or challenge themselves.

Creates some learning experiences that guide students to identify needs, ask for support, and challenge themselves to take risks.

Consistently creates learning experiences that guide students to identify their strengths, interests, and needs; ask for support when appropriate; take risks; and challenge themselves to succeed.

Consistently supports students to identify their strengths, interests, and needs; ask for support; take risks; challenge themselves; set learning goals; and monitor their own progress. Is able to model this element.

Indicator II-C.   Cultural Proficiency: Actively creates and maintains an environment in which students’ diverse backgrounds, identities, strengths, and challenges are respected.

II-C. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

II-C-1. Respects Differences

Establishes an environment in which students demonstrate limited respect for individual differences.

Establishes an environment in which students generally demonstrate respect for individual differences.

Consistently uses strategies and practices that are likely to enable students to demonstrate respect for and affirm their own and others’ differences related to background, identity, language, strengths, and challenges.

Establishes an environment in which students respect and affirm their own and others’ differences and are supported to share and explore differences and similarities related to background, identity, language, strengths, and challenges. Is able to model this element.

II-C-2. Maintains Respectful Environment

Minimizes or ignores conflicts and/or responds in inappropriate ways.

Anticipates and responds appropriately to some conflicts or misunderstandings but ignores and/or minimizes others.

Anticipates and responds appropriately to conflicts or misunderstandings arising from differences in backgrounds, languages, and identities.

Anticipates and responds appropriately to conflicts or misunderstandings arising from differences in backgrounds, languages, and identities in ways that lead students to be able to do the same independently. Is able to model this element.

Indicator II-D.     Expectations: Plans and implements lessons and/or supports that set clear and high expectations and also make knowledge, information, and/or supports accessible for all students.

II-D. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

II-D-1. Clear Expectations

Does not make specific standards for student work, effort, interactions, and behavior clear to students.

May communicate specific standards for student work, effort, interactions, and behavior, but inconsistently or ineffectively enforces them.

Clearly communicates and consistently enforces specific standards for student work, effort, and behavior.

Clearly communicates and consistently enforces specific standards for student work, effort, interactions, and behavior so that most students are able to describe them and take ownership of meeting them. Is able to model this element.

II-D-2. High Expectations

Gives up on some students or communicates that some cannot accomplish challenging goals. .

May tell students that a goal is challenging and that they need to work hard but does not model ways students can accomplish the goal through effective effort. .

Effectively models and reinforces ways that students can set and accomplish challenging goals through effective effort, rather than having to depend on innate ability.

Effectively models and reinforces ways that students can consistently accomplish challenging goals through effective effort. Successfully challenges students’ misconceptions about innate ability. Is able to model this element.

II-D-3. Access to Knowledge

Rarely adapts instruction, services, plans, communication, and/or assessments to make curriculum/supports accessible to all students for whom the educator has responsibility.

Occasionally adapts instruction, services, plans, communication, and/or assessments to make curriculum/supports accessible to all students for whom the educator has responsibility.

Consistently adapts instruction, services, plans, communication, and/or assessments to make curriculum/ supports accessible to all students for whom the educator has responsibility, including English learners and students with disabilities.

Individually and with colleagues, consistently adapts instruction, services, plans, communication, and/or assessments to make curriculum/supports accessible to all students for whom the educator has responsibility, including English learners and students with disabilities. Is able to model this element.

Standard III: Family and Community Engagement. Promotes the learning and growth of all students through effective partnerships with families, caregivers, community members, and organizations.

Indicator III-A.     Engagement: Welcomes and encourages every family to become active participants in the classroom and school community.

III-A. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

III-A-1. Parent/Family

Engagement

Does not welcome families to become participants in the classroom and school community or actively discourages their participation.

Makes limited attempts to involve families in school and/or classroom activities, meetings, and planning.

Uses a variety of strategies to support families to participate actively and appropriately in the classroom and school community.

Successfully engages most families and sustains their active and appropriate participation in the classroom and school community. Is able to model this element.

Indicator III-B.     Collaboration: Collaborates with families to create and implement strategies for supporting student learning and development both at home and at school.

III-B. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

III-B-1. Learning Expectations

Does not inform parents about learning, behavior, and/or wellness expectations.

Sends home only a list of rules/expectations and an outline of the student learning, behavior, or wellness plan for the year.

Consistently provides parents with clear, user-friendly expectations for student learning, behavior, and/or wellness.

Successfully conveys to most parents clear, user-friendly student learning, behavior, and wellness expectations. Is able to model this element.

III-B-2. Student Support

Rarely, if ever, communicates with parents on ways to support learning and development at home or at school.

Sends home occasional suggestions on how parents can support learning and development at home or at school.

Regularly communicates with parents to create, share, and/or identify strategies for supporting learning and development at school and home.

Regularly communicates with parents to share and/or identify strategies for supporting learning and development at school and home, successfully encourages most families to use at least one of these strategies, and seeks out evidence of their impact. Is able to model this element.

Indicator III-C.     Communication: Engages in regular, two-way, and culturally proficient communication with families about student learning, behavior and wellness.

III-C. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

III-C-1. Two-Way Communication

Rarely communicates with families except through required reports; rarely solicits or responds promptly to communications from families.

Relies primarily on sharing general information and announcements with families through one-way media and usually responds promptly to communications from families.

Regularly uses two-way communication with families about student learning, behavior, and wellness; responds promptly and carefully to communications from families.

Regularly uses a two-way system that supports frequent, proactive, and personalized communication with families about individual student learning, behavior, and wellness. Is able to model this element.

III-C-2. Culturally Proficient Communication

Makes few attempts to respond to different family cultural norms and/or responds inappropriately or disrespectfully.

May communicate respectfully and make efforts to take into account different families’ home language, culture, and values, but does so inconsistently or does not demonstrate understanding and sensitivity to the differences.

Always communicates respectfully with families and demonstrates understanding of and sensitivity to different families’ home language, culture, and values.

Always communicates respectfully with families and demonstrates understanding and appreciation of different families’ home language, culture, and values. Is able to model this element.

Standard IV: Professional Culture. Promotes the learning and growth of all students through ethical, culturally proficient, skilled, and collaborative practice.

Indicator IV-A.     Reflection: Demonstrates the capacity to reflect on and improve the educator’s own practice, using informal means as well as meetings with teams and work groups to gather information, analyze data, examine issues, set meaningful goals, and develop new approaches in order to improve teaching and learning.

IV-A. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-A-1. Reflective Practice

Demonstrates limited reflection on practice and/or use of insights gained to improve practice.

May reflect on the effectiveness of instruction, supports, and interactions with students but not with colleagues and/or rarely uses insights gained to improve practice.

Regularly reflects on the effectiveness of instruction, supports, and interactions with students, both individually and with colleagues, and uses insights gained to improve practice and student outcomes.

Regularly reflects on the effectiveness of instruction, supports, and interactions with students, both individually and with colleagues; and uses and shares with colleagues insights gained to improve practice and student outcomes. Is able to model this element.

IV-A-2. Goal Setting

Participates passively in the goal-setting process and/or proposes goals that are vague or easy to reach.

Proposes one goal that is vague or easy to achieve and/or bases goals on a limited self-assessment and analysis of student data.

Proposes challenging, measurable professional practice, team, and student learning goals that are based on thorough self-assessment and analysis of student data.

Individually and with colleagues builds capacity to propose and monitor challenging, measurable goals based on thorough self-assessment and analysis of student data. Is able to model this element.

Indicator IV-B.     Professional Growth: Actively pursues professional development and learning opportunities to improve quality of practice or build the expertise and experience to assume different instructional and leadership roles.

IV-B. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-B-1. Professional Learning and Growth

Participates in few, if any, professional development and learning opportunities to improve practice and/or applies little new learning to practice.

Participates only in required professional development and learning activities and/or inconsistently or inappropriately applies new learning to improve practice.

Consistently seeks out and applies, when appropriate, ideas for improving practice from supervisors, colleagues, professional development activities, and other resources to gain expertise and/or assume different instruction and leadership responsibilities.

Consistently seeks out professional development and learning opportunities that improve practice and build expertise of self and other educators in instruction, academic support, and leadership. Is able to model this element.

Indicator IV-C.     Collaboration: Collaborates effectively with colleagues on a wide range of tasks.

IV-C. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-C-1. Professional Collaboration

Rarely and/or ineffectively collaborates with colleagues; conversations often lack focus on student performance and/or development.

Does not consistently collaborate with colleagues in ways that support productive team effort.

Consistently and effectively collaborates with colleagues through shared planning and/or informal conversation in such work as: analyzing student performance and development and planning appropriate interventions at the classroom or school level.

Facilitates effective collaboration among colleagues through shared planning and/or informal conversation in such work as analyzing student performance and development and planning appropriate, comprehensive interventions at the classroom and school level. Is able to model this element.

IV-C-2. Consultation

Regularly provides inappropriate advice; does not provide advice and expertise to general education teachers or other colleagues unless prompted to do so; and/or fails to offer advice when appropriate.

Provides advice and expertise to support general education teachers and other colleagues to create appropriate and effective academic, behavioral, and social/emotional learning experiences for only some students for whom responsibility is shared, or sometimes provides advice that is inappropriate or poorly customized.

Regularly provides appropriate advice and expertise that is customized to support general education teachers and other colleagues to create appropriate and effective academic, behavioral, and social/emotional learning experiences for students for whom responsibility is shared.

Utilizes a variety of means to regularly provide advice and expertise that is customized to support general education teachers and other colleagues to successfully create appropriate and effective academic, behavioral, and social/emotional learning experiences for students. Is able to model this element.

Indicator IV-D.     Decision-Making: Becomes involved in schoolwide decision making, and takes an active role in school improvement planning.

IV-D. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-D-1. Decision-Making

Participates in planning and decision making at the school, department, and/or grade level only when asked and rarely contributes relevant ideas or expertise.

May participate in planning and decision making at the school, department, and/or grade level but rarely contributes relevant ideas or expertise.

Consistently contributes relevant ideas and expertise to planning and decision making at the school, department, and/or grade level.

In planning and decision-making at the school, department, and/or grade level, consistently contributes ideas and expertise that are critical to school improvement efforts. Is able to model this element.

Indicator IV-E.     Shared Responsibility: Shares responsibility for the performance of all students within the school.

IV-E. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-E-1. Shared Responsibility

Rarely reinforces schoolwide behavior and learning expectations for all students and/or makes a limited contribution to their learning by rarely sharing responsibility for meeting their needs.

Within and beyond the classroom, inconsistently reinforces schoolwide behavior and learning expectations for all students, and/or makes a limited contribution to their learning by inconsistently sharing responsibility for meeting their needs.

Within and beyond the classroom, consistently reinforces school-wide behavior and learning expectations for all students, and contributes to their learning by sharing responsibility for meeting their needs.

Individually and with colleagues, develops strategies and actions that contribute to the learning and productive behavior of all students at the school. Is able to model this element.

Indicator IV-F.     Professional Responsibilities: Is ethical and reliable, and meets routine responsibilities consistently.

IV-F. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-F-1. Judgment

Demonstrates poor judgment and/or discloses confidential student information inappropriately.

Sometimes demonstrates questionable judgment and/or inadvertently shares confidential information.

Demonstrates sound judgment reflecting integrity, honesty, fairness, and trustworthiness and protects student confidentiality appropriately.

Demonstrates sound judgment and acts appropriately to protect student confidentiality, rights and safety. Is able to model this element.

IV-F-2. Reliability & Responsibility

Frequently misses or is late to assignments, makes errors in records, and/or misses paperwork deadlines; frequently late or absent.

Occasionally misses or is late to assignments, completes work late, and/or makes errors in records.

Consistently fulfills professional responsibilities; is consistently punctual and reliable with paperwork, duties, and assignments; and is rarely late or absent from school.

Consistently fulfills all professional responsibilities to high standards. Is able to model this element.