Concord-Carlisle

Show detailed information about district and contract

DistrictConcord-Carlisle
Shared Contract District
Org Code6400000
Type of DistrictRegional Secondary
Union AffiliationMTA
Most Recent DocumentContract
Expiring Year2017
Expired Status
Superintendency Union
Regional HS MembersConcord-Carlisle
Vocational HS Members
CountyMiddlesex
ESE RegionGreater Boston
Urban
Kind of Communityeconomically developed suburbs
Number of Schools1
Enrollment1245
Percent Low Income Students4
Grade Start9
Grade End12
download pdf version of this document view accessible version of this document Concord-Carlisle

AGREEMENT

BETWEEN

CONCORD-CARLISLE REGIONAL DISTRICT

SCHOOL COMMITTEE

AND

CONCORD-CARLISLE TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION

2014 – 2017

ARTICLE 1

RECOGNITION

1.1.      Pursuant to General Laws, Chapter 150E, the Concord-Carlisle Regional District School Committee recognizes the Concord-Carlisle Teachers’ Association as the exclusive representative for purposes of collective bargaining with respect to wages, hours and other conditions of employment for all regular full-time and regular part-time professional instructional personnel employed by the Concord-Carlisle Regional School District, consisting of all classroom teachers, department chairpersons, specialized teaching personnel, librarians, counselors, social workers, psychologists, and speech therapists, but excluding the Superintendent of Schools, administrative assistants, directors, managers, principals, assistant principals, supervisors, aides, paraprofessionals, nurses, tutors, clerical assistants/secretaries, and all other employees of the Concord-Carlisle Regional School District.

1.2.     The terms “teacher” and “teachers” as used hereafter in this Agreement refer only to such persons as at the time in question fall within the bargaining unit as defined in this Article.

ARTICLE 2

ASSOCIATION SECURITY

2.1. DUES DEDUCTION.

2.1.1.     The School District agrees to deduct from the salaries of teachers who have on file with the School District an executed current dues deduction authorization card, dues for the Concord-Carlisle Teachers’ Association, the Massachusetts Teachers’ Association, and, if so authorized, the National Education Association and to transmit the monies to the Concord-Carlisle Teachers’ Association Treasurer. Teacher authorizations shall be in a form which is acceptable to the School District.

2.1.2.    Deductions referred to in Section 2.1.1. above will be made in equal payments in amounts certified by the Association Treasurer as being the regular membership dues of the Association, the Massachusetts Teachers’ Association and, if applicable, the National Education Association with a frequency mutually agreed upon by the Treasurers of the Association and the Region until the total deduction has been reached. In no event will the last deduction extend beyond the last paycheck in June.

2.1.3.   The Concord-Carlisle Regional Treasurer will submit the amounts deducted to the Association Treasurer as soon as is reasonably possible after the issuance of the paycheck from which the deductions were taken, together with a list of the teachers from whose salaries dues were deducted and the amount of the deduction for each teacher.

2.1.4.    The provisions of Article 2 shall be subject to the requirement of Section 17C of Chapter 180 of the General Laws including the requirement that the Treasurer of the Concord-Carlisle Regional School District shall be satisfied by such evidence as he/she may require that the Treasurer of the Association has given to the Association a bond, in a form approved by the Commissioner of Corporations and Taxation, for the faithful performance of his/her duties, in a sum and with such surety or sureties as are satisfactory to said Regional Treasurer.

2.1.5.     The Association shall indemnify and save the School District harmless against any claim, demand, suit or other form of liability that may arise out of, or by reason of, action taken or not taken by the School District for the purpose of complying with this Article 2 or in compliance with any dues deduction authorization furnished to the School District, or for the purpose of complying with Section 18.1.1.3. of this Agreement.

2.2.  USE OF SCHOOL FACILITIES. The School District agrees to permit the Association reasonable use of school facilities in accordance with the practices in existence during the 2004-2007 school year. The needs of the Association will be considered along with other school needs when considering the use to which available space will be put in the event expected increases in student enrollment materialize.

2.3.  DISCRIMINATION. Neither the School District nor the Association will discriminate against, restrain or coerce any teacher because of membership or non-membership in the Association.

ARTICLE 3

SALARY

3.1.     There are two components to be considered in arriving at the salary for teachers. They are:

A)  Regular Teaching Salary, 185-Day Contract, which consists of:

1)  Base Salary, as defined in Section 3.3. This is understood to be the remuneration for all professional activities during the 185-day contract period of any school year.

2)  Retained Merit, as defined in Section 3.4.

3)  Experience Increments, as defined in Section 3.5.

B)  Compensation for Additional Duties. The Salary Policy includes a list of responsibilities for which additional compensation is authorized. The amount authorized is added each year to the annual compensation for which the teacher is eligible.

3.2. ANNUAL TEACHING SALARY.

3.2.1.  The annual teaching salary is the Regular Teaching Salary.

3.2.2.   Those teachers engaged in special co-curricular activities are paid a differential each year in accordance with Article 6, Compensation for Certain Co-Curricular Responsibilities. This differential is added to the salary as listed above.   It is not a part of the regular teaching sala

3.3. BASE SALARY SCHEDULE

Teacher’s Salaries 2014 – 2015

STEP

BACH

B+15

MAST

M+15

M+30

M+45

M+60

DOC

1

45,641

47,926

53,402

54,772

56,139

57,508

58,878

60,351

2

47,467

49,839

55,537

56,963

58,387

59,810

61,234

62,763

3

49,366

51,834

57,758

59,241

60,721

62,202

63,684

65,275

4

51,342

53,909

60,071

61,610

63,151

64,688

66,230

67,886

5

53,394

56,065

62,471

64,072

65,677

67,277

68,880

70,602

6

55,530

58,307

64,971

66,638

68,301

69,969

71,635

73,427

7

57,752

60,641

67,570

69,303

71,036

72,767

74,499

76,361

8

60,061

63,066

70,272

72,074

73,877

75,680

77,481

79,418

9

62,465

65,588

73,084

74,958

76,832

78,720

80,579

82,592

10

64,965

68,210

76,007

77,957

79,905

81,855

83,801

85,896

11

67,562

70,939

79,050

81,075

83,102

85,128

87,155

89,335

12

70,266

73,777

82,211

84,317

86,425

88,533

90,642

92,909

13

73,074

76,730

85,497

87,690

89,882

92,075

94,267

96,624

14

75,998

79,799

88,916

91,198

93,477

95,759

98,037

100,489

15

79,039

82,992

92,473

94,847

97,217

99,589

101,960

104,509

16

83,411

87,581

97,589

100,094

102,595

105,095

107,600

110,290

Teacher’s Salaries 2015 – 2016

STEP

BACH

B+15

MAST

M+15

M+30

M+45

M+60

DOC

1

46,554

48,884

54,470

55,867

57,262

58,658

60,056

61,558

2

48,416

50,836

56,648

58,102

59,555

61,006

62,458

64,018

3

50,353

52,871

58,913

60,425

61,935

63,446

64,957

66,580

4

52,369

54,987

61,272

62,842

64,414

65,982

67,554

69,244

5

54,462

57,187

63,720

65,354

66,990

68,623

70,257

72,014

6

56,640

59,473

66,270

67,970

69,667

71,368

73,067

74,895

7

58,907

61,854

68,921

70,689

72,457

74,222

75,989

77,889

8

61,262

64,327

71,677

73,516

75,354

77,194

79,031

81,007

9

63,714

66,900

74,546

76,457

78,368

80,294

82,191

84,244

10

66,264

69,575

77,527

79,516

81,503

83,492

85,477

87,614

11

68,913

72,358

80,631

82,696

84,765

86,831

88,898

91,121

12

71,671

75,252

83,855

86,004

88,153

90,304

92,455

94,767

13

74,535

78,264

87,207

89,444

91,680

93,917

96,153

98,556

14

77,518

81,395

90,695

93,022

95,346

97,674

99,998

102,499

15

80,620

84,652

94,323

96,744

99,162

101,580

103,999

106,599

16

85,079

89,333

99,540

102,095

104,647

107,197

109,752

112,495

Teacher’s Salaries 2016 – 2017

STEP

BACH

B+15

MAST

M+15

M+30

M+45

M+60

DOC

1

47,601

49,984

55,696

57,124

58,550

59,978

61,407

62,943

2

49,505

51,980

57,922

59,409

60,895

62,379

63,864

65,458

3

51,486

54,061

60,238

61,785

63,329

64,873

66,419

68,078

4

53,547

56,224

62,651

64,256

65,864

67,467

69,074

70,802

5

55,687

58,473

65,154

66,824

68,498

70,167

71,838

73,635

6

57,915

60,812

67,761

69,500

71,235

72,974

74,711

76,580

7

60,233

63,246

70,472

72,279

74,087

75,892

77,698

79,641

8

62,640

65,774

73,290

75,170

77,050

78,930

80,809

82,829

9

65,148

68,405

76,223

78,177

80,131

82,101

84,040

86,140

10

67,755

71,140

79,272

81,305

83,337

85,371

87,400

89,585

11

70,464

73,986

82,445

84,557

86,672

88,784

90,898

93,172

12

73,284

76,945

85,742

87,939

90,137

92,335

94,535

96,899

13

76,212

80,025

89,170

91,457

93,743

96,030

98,316

100,774

14

79,262

83,226

92,735

95,115

97,492

99,871

102,248

104,805

15

82,433

86,557

96,445

98,920

101,393

103,866

106,339

108,998

16

86,993

91,343

101,780

104,393

107,001

109,608

112,221

115,026

3.4. EXPERIENCE INCREMENTS. In recognition of service in the Concord and Concord-Carlisle School Districts including authorized leaves of absence, teachers shall receive yearly increments as follows:

Years of Service

% of Bachelor’s Maximum

10-14

2%

15-19

3%

20-24

4%

25-29

5%

30+

6%

Effective upon the last day of the 2007 – 2010 agreement, the 35 – 39 category and all higher categories (40 – 44, 45 – 49, etc.), shall be eliminated, and the highest category shall be a 30+ category, at the rate provided for the 30 – 34 category. Any teacher who, prior to the last day of the 2007 – 2010 agreement, was already receiving experience increments in a category higher than the 30 – 34 category shall continue to receive the percentage of the Bachelor’s Maximum provided for such a higher category, but shall not advance further to any higher category.

3.5. Base Salary for teachers is considered to define the normal salary range and progression for teachers employed by the Concord-Carlisle Regional School District. It is understood to be the full remuneration for all professional activities, except such others as are specifically defined in subsequent articles associated with employment for 185 days. At various times during the school year, as defined on the annual school calendar, teachers will be expected to participate in in-service activities associated with their positions.

3.5.1.   With the exception of new teachers who may be required to attend special orientation sessions during the week prior to the opening of school, the period of employment for teachers will be 185 days.

3.5.2.  The 185 days include 180 instructional days and 5 professional work days. These professional days shall include one or two days prior to school opening.

3.5.3.    Five contingency days will be included in the school calendar. If these contingency days are not needed, the School District will adjust the calendar in regard to the last day of school to ensure that there are exactly 180 instructional days.

3.5.4.   Only absences specifically allowed in the contract may reduce the working days below 185. Exceptions may be made by the Superintendent for unforeseen circumstances.

3.6. PLACEMENT ON STEPS. Steps in the Base Salary Scales for teachers define the normal progression of teachers in the employ of the Concord-Carlisle Regional School District who serve satisfactorily. Normally, a teacher without experience will be awarded a salary at the first step. A teacher commencing his/her second year will be awarded a salary at the second step, etc.

3.6.1.   Experience. Experience will be determined to the nearest number of whole years of teaching experience in Concord, Carlisle or other schools in which the experience may be deemed to contribute to the teacher’s proficiency. Fractions of a school year equal to, or greater than, one-half will be considered a whole year.

3.6.1.1.   Military Service. Full credit on the base salary schedule will be allowed for each year of military service for individuals whose teaching service was interrupted thereby and half credit will be allowed for each year of military service for individuals whose teaching service was not interrupted thereby.

3.6.1.2.  Unusual Service. In situations where the foregoing stipulations do not appear reasonable, a candidate’s experiences may be evaluated to determine the step applicable, such evaluation being presented by the Principal, subject to the approval of the Superintendent.

3.6.1.3.   Initial Employment. At the discretion of the principal, subject to the approval of the Superintendent, credit upon hiring or rehiring may be given for prior full-time teaching experience in public or private schools, college teaching experience or other experience. Normal progression, if service is satisfactory, may be anticipated thereafter starting from this point.

3.6.2.   Step Increment Withheld. Increments are not considered automatic. A step increment may be withheld by the Superintendent, upon recommendation of the principal, from teachers whom receive an overall unsatisfactory rating on the summative evaluation.

3.6.3.   Salary increases for teachers at maximum whom receive an overall unsatisfactory rating on the summative evaluation may be withheld by the Superintendent upon the recommendation of the principal.

ARTICLE 4

PLACEMENT ON SCALES

4.1.     The training classification is based on academic degrees. Evidence of degree status in the form of a transcript or other official statement from the college or university involved will be required of all teachers.

4.2.     Placement on all scales will be made at the beginning of the school year and February 1 depending upon the date of satisfactory completion of the course work and its proximity to either of these dates.

4.3.     Teachers who have earned a Bachelor’s degree are eligible for salaries listed under that heading. Experienced teachers who may have earned such a degree may be considered in this category.

4.4.    Credit toward the B+15 scale will be awarded for courses that are completed as part of a Master’s degree program or that could be used toward a Master’s degree in the teacher’s field, a related field or in secondary education. Credit will be given for undergraduate courses if they are required as part of a Master’s program. With the Superintendent’s prior approval, credit may be given for in-service courses, workshops, and institutes requiring outside preparation if such courses can be demonstrated to be part of a Master’s program and if the amount of work required by the participant is generally comparable to that expected of a student in a regular graduate course.

4.5.      Teachers who have earned a Master’s degree from a college or university accredited by the New England Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools or similar agencies are eligible for salaries on the Master’s degree scale.

4.6.      Teachers who have earned a Doctor’s degree from a college or university accredited by the New England Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools or similar agencies are eligible for salaries on the Doctor’s degree scale.

4.7.      Placement of staff members on the salary scale at Masters+15, Masters+30, Masters+45, Masters+60 is at the discretion of the Superintendent based on age and relevancy of the course. Official, certified transcripts of courses in addition to those courses required for the Master’s degree are to be forwarded to the Superintendent for approval prior to placement on the appropriate salary scale either before the beginning of the school year or February 1. The Superintendent, at his/her discretion may also consider credit for undergraduate courses, workshops, and institutes requiring out-of-class preparation, if such courses and/or workshops can be demonstrated to be part of a defined post Master’s program or are related to the teacher’s assignment. In the case of workshops or institutes, the teacher must be able to demonstrate that the amount of work required of the participant would be equivalent to that required of a student in a regular graduate course.

4.7.1.  Credit for courses which have not been approved in advance by the Superintendent is at the discretion of the Superintendent.

4.7.2.  CCRSD in-service credit earned at any point will be applied towards lane changes after a Masters Degree is conferred.

ARTICLE 5

DOUBLE INCREMENTS

5.1. Upon the recommendation of the principal, the Superintendent may grant an additional increment to teachers who have at least one but less than three years’ service in the schools. Teachers so recommended would be extremely outstanding in their performance.

ARTICLE 6

COMPENSATION FOR CERTAIN CO-CURRICULAR RESPONSIBILITIES

6.1.    As stated in Article 9, during the contract period from the beginning of the school year to June 30, staff members are expected to be available whenever necessary to discharge properly their professional responsibilities.

6.2.    All teachers are expected, as part of their regular duties to participate in activities outside the classroom as defined in Section 9.1. of this Agreement. Some activities, however, require considerably more time and energy than that which can be expected in the description of professional responsibilities contained in this Agreement. This is the case in guidance and social work conferences, coaching athletics teams after school and supervising some of the other co-curricular activities.

6.3.   The co-curricular responsibilities listed in Section 6.7 will carry additional stipends in the amounts indicated. The range is to provide a minimum and maximum within which a person assuming responsibilities for the various activities may be paid.

6.3.1.    A teacher beginning with a given activity would normally start at the minimum salary but, upon the recommendation of the principal and subject to the approval of the Superintendent, may be placed at any step within the appropriate scale.

6.3.2.    It is understood that increments would be granted on a merit basis. They may be withheld, if, in the opinion of the school administration, the responsibility does not warrant the additional pay. By the same token, they may be increased if, in the opinion of the school administration the responsibility warrants the additional amount. All such variations within the range are subject to the approval of the School Committee.

6.4.      It is recommended that no teacher undertake coaching responsibilities for more than two seasons or two sports in any one school year. It is strongly recommended also that no classroom teacher assume more than one major coaching responsibility.

6.5.      Assignment of coaching duties and special responsibilities for the following school year will be made prior to March 1, insofar as is possible. The teacher’s gross salary will be computed by adding the differential for special duties to the Regular Salary, provided however that coaching stipends shall not be added to the teacher’s Regular Salary, but shall instead be paid in two equal installments during the athletic season. Adjustments for special duties will be made from time to time if necessary.

6.6.      Before filling a vacancy in any position referred to in Section 6.7. notice of the vacancy will be posted for ten (10) school days in each faculty room, each department office, and given to the Association President, provided that this shall not limit the School District’s right to make temporary appointments when the School District determines such is necessary for the effective continuation of the program, and provided further that the posting requirement for vacancies to be filled during the summer recess will be satisfied by mailing notice of vacancies to the home of the President of the Association or his/her designee. The notice of vacancy shall include a description of the qualifications required for the position, the salary range and the closing date for applications. Applicants for such positions who are members of the bargaining unit covered by this Agreement shall have preference in filling any vacancy covered by this section if they meet the qualifications of the posting.

6.7.  STIPENDS FOR CO-CURRICULAR RESPONSIBILITIES.

Varsity Coach

Football

 

 

 

 

FY15 - FY 17

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Step 4

Step 5

 

$ 6,102.00

$ 6,706.00

$ 7,370.00

$ 8,099.00

$ 8,900.00

 

Asst. V. Football (2)

 

 

 

 

FY15 - FY 17

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Step 4

Step 5

 

$ 3,771.00

$ 4,144.00

$ 4,554.00

$ 5,005.00

$ 5,500.00

 

Fr. Football (2)

 

 

 

 

FY15 - FY 17

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Step 4

Step 5

 

$ 3,358.00

$ 3,691.00

$ 4,057.00

$ 4,459.00

$ 4,900.00

Varsity Coaches

XC (b)

XC (g)

Soccer (b)

Soccer (g)

Field Hockey

Volleyball

Golf

Basketball(B)

Basketball(g)

Wrestling

Ice Hockey (B)

Ice Hockey(g)

Fencing (b)

Fencing (g)

Swimming

Indoor Track (b/g)

Indoor Track (b/g)

Baseball

Lacrosse (b)

Lacrosse (g)

Softball

Outdoor Track (b/g)

Outdoor Track (b/g)

Tennis (b)

Tennis (g)

Skiing

Cheerleading

(fall &winter)

 

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Step 4

Step 5

FY15 - FY 17  

$4,810.00

$ 5,278.00

$ 5,791.00

$ 6,355.00

$ 6,975.00

JV Freshmen Coaches

JV Soccer (b)

JV Soccer (g)

JV Field Hockey

JV Volleyball

JV Basketball (b)

JV Basketball (g)

JV Ice Hockey (b)

JV Baseball

JV Softball

JV Lacrosse (b)

JV Lacrosse(g)

JV Tennis (b)

JV Tennis (g)

Fr. Soccer (b)

Fr. Soccer (g)

Fr. Field Hockey

Fr. Volleyball

Fr. Basketball (b)

Fr. Basketball (g)

Fr. Baseball

Fr. Softball

Fr. Lacrosse (b)

Fr. Lacrosse (g)

 

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Step 4

Step 5

FY15 - FY 17  

$ 3,219.00

$ 3,530.00

$ 3,871.00

$ 4,246.00

$ 4,658.00

Assistant Coaches

Skiing

Wrestling

Indoor Track

Indoor Track

Indoor Track.

Swimming

Outdoor Track

Outdoor Track

Outdoor Track

Lacrosse

Gymnastics

 

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Step 4

Step 5

FY15 -FY 17

$ 3,219.00

$ 3,530.00

$ 3,871.00

$ 4,246.00

$ 4,658.00

 

Activity 

Step

2014-15

2015-2016

2016-2017

Yearbook

1

$3,897

$3,974

$4,053

Outing Club

2

$4,309

$4,395

$4,482

 

3

$4,765

$4,860

$4,957

 

4

$5,269

$5,374

$5,481

 

5

$5,827

$5,943

$6,061

Radio Station

1

$3,633

$3,705

$3,779

 

2

$4,018

$4,098

$4,179

 

3

$4,443

$4,531

$4,621

Student Government

1

$3,480

$3,549

$3,619

 

2

$3,848

$3,924

$4,002

 

3

$4,255

$4,340

$4,426

NHS advisor

1

$3,360

$3,427

$3,495

Freshmen orientation

2

$3,716

$3,790

$3,865

Environ Field Studies (2)

3

$4,109

$4,191

$4,274

Newspaper

 

 

 

 

Website Design

 

 

 

 

Math Team

1

$3,142

$3,204

$3,268

MCAS Organizer

2

$3,474

$3,543

$3,613

 

3

$3,842

$3,918

$3,996

Pep Band

1

$3,078

$3,139

$3,201

 

2

$3,404

$3,471

$3,540

 

3

$3,764

$3,839

$3,915

Literary Magazine (Reflections)

1

$2,221

$2,265

$2,310

 

2

$2,456

$2,505

$2,555

 

3

$2,716

$2,770

$2,825

Academic Bowl

1

$2,020

$2,060

$2,101

Art Club

2

$2,234

$2,278

$2,323

Book PALS

3

$2,470

$2,519

$2,569

Chickenscratch

 

 

 

 

Dance Club

 

 

 

 

Danish Exchange

 

 

 

 

Drama (Per Production)

 

 

 

 

Environmental Club

Freshmen Orientation

Film Club

Foreign Exchange Trips-4

History Reading Club

Interact Club

Japan Coordinator

Junior State

Magic Club

Model UN

Moot Court

Percussion Club

Sci-fi Club

Spectrum (2)

T.O.Y.S.

Tech Crew

Ultimate Frisbee

Weather Service

WEEDS (gardening club)

Yoga Club

METCO Host Family Coordinator

No Step Structure

$1,000

$1,020

$1,040

Pit Orchestra

No Step Structure

$4,000

$4,080

$4,161

Fitness Supervisor (per season)

No Step Structure

$1,638

$1,670

$1,703

AP Facilitator

No Step Structure

$2,000

$2,040

$2,080

Chemical Hygienist

No Step Structure

$2,184

$2,227

$2,271

Internship Coordinator (does not include grant $)

No Step Structure

$2,500

$2,550

$2,601

Mentor Teacher Leader

No Step Structure

$1,091

$1,113

$1,135

Freshmen Advisor

No Step Structure

$1,671

$1,704

$1,738

Sophomore Advisor

No Step Structure

$1,726

$1,760

$1,795

Junior Advisor

No Step Structure

$2,224

$2,268

$2,313

Senior Advisor

No Step Structure

$3,248

$3,312

$3,378

Art Liason

No Step Structure

$4,000

$4,080

$4,161

6.7.1

All coaching stipends shall be increased for the 2015 – 2016 school year only, based on the Stipend Calculations formula in Appendix C.

6.8.     DEPARTMENT CHAIRPERSONS.

Compensation for Department Chairs shall be as follows:

Group I                                  (7 or more persons)                                              9% of Bmax

Group II                                 (fewer than 7 persons)                                       7% of Bmax

Compensation for Department Chairs serving a second term would be increased by an additional two percent of Bmax.

6.9.     MENTORING

Compensation for Mentors shall be as follows:

Mentor                                   $1,000 Mentor

Guide                                     $ 500

6.10.   ADDED POSITIONS. Additional co-curricular positions may be added upon the recommendation of the Superintendent and the approval of the School District. Teachers interested in submitting proposals for such positions are encouraged to do so by November 1 in order to be sure of having them considered for inclusion in the budget for the following academic year; however, proposals may be submitted until June 1. The School District will attempt to retain some unassigned funds in its budget for the purpose of funding co-curricular positions. In making a proposal, the teacher must demonstrate that a need exists and that there are a sufficient number of students interested in the project to make it worthwhile. Recognizing that there are limited funds available for such positions, priority will be given to groups which are already functioning with a volunteer leader. It is recognized that because of budget limitations, proposals will not automatically receive funding. If at the end of a school year interest in an activity declines below the point of viability, the principal has the right to eliminate the position but will not do so without consulting the persons directly involved.

6.10.1. The Superintendent’s designee will meet with the head of Negotiations Committee to determine placement on the Co-curricular scale. This determination will be made by October 1.

6.11.  STIPENDS FOR COACHING POSITIONS. It is the objective of the School Committee and the Association to have a salary schedule for all coaching positions in which the average of the maximum rates for the sports of baseball, lacrosse, hockey, basketball, field hockey and soccer, will be within the upper third of the averages in each community of the maximum rates for comparable positions (that is, positions having similar actual duties, even if not the same title) in the same six sports, within the following communities: Acton-Boxborough, Bedford, Concord-Carlisle High School, Lexington, Lincoln-Sudbury, Needham, Newton, Wayland, Wellesley, Westford and Weston. The methodology actually employed for this purpose is reflected in Appendix C to this agreement. Not later than December 15 of the final year of each con-tract, a report will be prepared by the School District to determine whether this objective is being met.

ARTICLE 7

PROCEDURE FOR PAYMENT OF SALARIES

7.1. 185-DAY CONTRACTS.

7.1.1.  Personnel on the 185-day contracts will be paid Regular Salary plus appropriate differentials in twenty-six (26) bi-weekly installments commencing in September.

7.1.2.  A staff member who determines that s/he desires to have his/her June and July paychecks paid as a lump sum no later than June 30 of the school year in which the compensation is due shall make such election on the form incorporated hereto no later than July 31 of the year preceding the school year in which the compensation is due. The election form will be distributed in the last paycheck in the month of June and must be returned to the Deputy Superintendent of Finance and Operations Office no later than July 31 of the upcoming school year. Once a staff member makes an election, that election of payment shall remain in effect until such time as the staff member changes his/her election.

For staff hired between August 1st and before the first day of school, the Internal Revenue Service deadline which requires election of payment methodology prior to the first day of school shall be used.

Notwithstanding the options outlined herein, for those employees who do not notify the Deputy Superintendent of Finance and Operations in a timely manner, the twenty-six (26) pay period option shall be the default method of payment.

Should the IRS eliminate the 409A requirements for school employees, the parties will reinstitute the original language of 7.1.2 of the 2007-2010 Collective Bargaining Agreement.

7.1.3. Personnel who begin their service after the beginning of the contract year or terminate their service before the end of the contract year will be paid on a pro-rated basis according to the following formula:

(Days of service/185) x Regular Teaching Salary = total pay entitlement

ARTICLE 8

PROFESSIONAL GROWTH PRACTICES

8.1.     All teachers are expected to keep abreast of, and alert to, new developments in their special fields through course work, workshops, lectures and other special study.

8.2.     At the discretion of the Superintendent, opportunities may be provided and financed for staff members to improve themselves in areas and skills required by the school system. Such areas would include academic work, special programs and in-service programs as may be specified by supervisors or administrators or requested by individual staff members.

8.3.   PROFESSIONAL INDUCTION PROGRAM. The parties agree to implement

a Professional Induction Program (PIP) for the purpose of inducting new teachers, those in their first through fifth year, to the school system.

8.3.1.   During a teacher’s first year in the Concord-Carlisle High School, he/she will participate as a mentee in the Mentor Program, the costs of which will be covered by the school system. Appropriate PDP’s will be awarded to the mentee upon completion of the Mentor Program. 9-12 faculty will not be required to attend curriculum committee meetings during the Mentor year. After the Professional Growth Review Committee (PGRC) has established criteria for which credit will be given toward movement on the salary schedule, the Superintendent will consider whether or not the Mentor Program meets the criteria and merits one or more in-service credits.

8.3.2.   During a teacher’s third year, he/she will participate in a district determined curriculum or pedagogical course unless an exemption has been granted by the Superintendent upon recommendation by the PGRC. Three in-service credits toward movement on the salary schedule and appropriate PDP’s will be granted upon successful completion of this course.

8.3.3.  Within five (5) years of entering the Concord-Carlisle High School system, a teacher will take the Empowering Multicultural Initiatives course, and no movement to the next step on the salary scale after the fifth year will occur unless this requirement is met or an exemption is obtained. Three in-service credits toward movement on the salary schedule and appropriate PDP’s will be granted upon successful completion of this course. Retroactive credits will be awarded to any faculty member who took this course in the 1995-1996 or the 1996-1997 school year. For any year during such five years in which the Empowering Multicultural Initiatives course is not offered, a teacher shall be granted an additional year within which to complete this requirement.

8.3.4.   The school system will cover all costs related to the PIP. Teachers of these courses will be recruited openly within the school system as well as from outside the school system. Any change in course offerings in the PIP will include input from the PGRC. The final decision rests with the Superintendent.

8.3.5.    The Concord-Carlisle Teachers’ Association may undertake an evaluation of the PIP courses. Resulting data, as well as individual course evaluations will be considered by the PGRC for the purposes of course improvement or suggested course alternatives.

8.3.6.  Courses are open to all teachers and administrators with priority being given to teachers who are required to take these courses. This does not apply to the Mentor Program.

8.3.7.  The Concord-Carlisle Teachers’ Association does not waive its rights under Chapter 150E to bargain over changes in working conditions that result from changes in the PIP.

8.4. INSERVICE INCENTIVE PROGRAM. An In-service Incentive Program (IIP) shall be established providing for in-service credit toward movement on the salary schedule. In addition to the two courses in the PIP already established, courses for which credit will be given must be equivalent to a university credit course, must have relevancy and rigor, and must be approved by the Superintendent. One credit shall be awarded for twelve (12) accumulated hours.

ARTICLE 9

PROFESSIONAL TIME RESPONSIBILITIES

9.1.      During the contract period, staff members are expected to be available whenever necessary to discharge properly their professional responsibilities. All teachers are expected, as part of their regular duties, to participate in activities outside the classroom pursuant to past practice. Any proposed major change in these activities will be discussed openly by the administration and the involved teachers (and/or their representatives) and they will attempt to reach a consensus. Teachers shall make themselves reasonably available to provide extra help to students, to meet and otherwise communicate with parents, and otherwise to involve themselves in the school community.

9.2.      Members of the staff whose time is required by the Superintendent beyond the regular contract period will be reimbursed for their time. The reimbursement will be calculated at one-fortieth of the Regular Salary per week spent.

9.3.     Curriculum projects, identified by the Superintendent shall be offered to staff members. Staff members will be involved in discussing matters relevant to the completion of the project. Compensation for such work will be $300/day.

9.4.    MENTOR TEACHER PROGRAM. The position of mentor teacher and/or mentor coach to a new teacher will be offered to teachers with professional teacher status and is rated on his or her summative evaluation as exemplary or proficient. Upon appointment, the mentor teacher will receive a stipend in accordance with Article 6.9. A mentor coach will receive a stipend of $500. (See Appendix A)

ARTICLE 10

PAYMENT FOR UNUSED SICK LEAVE

10.1.    Upon retirement from teaching, in accordance with the rules and regulations of the Massachusetts Teachers’ Retirement System, each teacher employed prior to the 1985-86 school year shall be paid for 50% of his/her accumulated unused sick leave up to a maximum of 100 days (200 days of accumulated Sick Leave). A teacher who voluntarily takes deferred retirement is not eligible for this unused sick leave payment.

10.2.   A teacher first employed after the 1984-85 school year upon retirement from teaching, in accordance with the rules and regulations of the Massachusetts Teachers’ Retirement System, shall be paid for 50% of his/her accumulated, unused sick leave up to a maximum of 62 days (124 days of accumulated Sick Leave). A teacher who voluntarily takes deferred retirement is not eligible for this unused sick leave payment.

10.3.    This pay will be calculated using his/her Regular Salary at the time of retirement on a per day basis according to the contract year in effect at the time with each day being 1/184 of the Regular Salary. It will not include other remuneration in the calculations. People working on a part-time schedule will accumulate and be paid for days in relation to the percentage of time actually worked.

10.4.    Payment of unused sick leave will be made in four (4) equal annual installments beginning with the first pay day in January following retirement.

10.5.    Upon the death or permanent disability of a member of the professional staff, payment for unused sick leave in accordance with the formula above will be made to the teacher or his/her beneficiary in one lump sum payment. Such payment may be made in four (4) equal installments as described in 10.4. if requested in writing.

10.6.    A teacher at step 7 of the salary scale (as renumbered pursuant to the 2007 – 2010 collective bargaining agreement) may, not later than October 15 of the school year at the start of which the teacher attained that step, elect to waive irrevocably any rights under this Article. Such election shall be made on a form provided by the School District. A teacher making such election shall, at the start of the next school year (that is, after completion of a year of service on step 7), advance to step 9 (rather than step 8) of the salary scale (unless the step increment was withheld in conformance with an applicable provision of this agreement) and shall, in the year following completion of the teacher’s year of service on step 14, advance to step 16 (rather than step 15) of the salary scale (unless the step increment was withheld in conformance with an applicable provision of this agreement). A teacher who attained and completed a year of service on step 8 (of the salary scales as in effect for the 2004 – 2007 collective bargaining agreement) during the 2006 – 2007 school year may make this election not later than October 15, 2007 and, upon making such an election, shall be advanced retroactively to the start of the 2007 – 2008 school year to the renumbered step 9.

10.7.    This Article shall not apply to teachers first regularly employed by the School District as a teacher after the 2006 – 2007 school year.

ARTICLE 11

ENROLLMENT OF CHILDREN OF PROFESSIONAL STAFF MEMBERS

11.1.    Upon the recommendation of the Superintendent and the approval of the School Committee, children of professional staff members may enroll, without charge for tuition, in the Concord-Carlisle Regional School District and in the Concord Public Schools.

11.2.     The provisions of this Article apply solely to regular education programs. Children requiring services pursuant to Chapter 766 shall be admitted only if the staff member agrees to pay tuition for the special education services and on the Superintendent’s recommendations.

11.3.   The provisions of this Article do not apply to placements in day or residential schools pursuant to Chapter 766.

11.4.     If the Concord-Carlisle School District at its sole discretion elects to participate in the state’s School Choice Program, the children of professional staff members will be given priority if legally allowable.

11.5.   Whatever the Concord-Carlisle School Committee’s decision concerning school choice, should this Article 11 at any time be identified as inconsistent with State Law, this Article 11 shall be construed pursuant to the applicable law without requiring any additional bargaining and with-out affecting any other provision of this contract.

ARTICLE 12

TUITION REIMBURSEMENT

12.1.     Contingent upon the Superintendent’s written approval prior to enrollment, professional staff members will be reimbursed for the cost of tuition (not to exceed $900.00 per school year or two courses, whichever comes first, less scholarships, grants, or vouchers) for courses at accredited colleges, universities or professional institutions. A minimum of $20,000 will be allocated in any one school year for such expenditures.

12.2.   Reimbursement of tuition will be made upon the successful completion of any approved course as evidenced by the submission of transcripts and proof of tuition payment.

12.3. Effective with the 2008 – 2009 contract year, and contingent upon the Superintendent’s written approval prior to enrollment, professional staff members will be reimbursed towards the cost of tuition for attendance at a program leading to licensure as a supervisor/director under Massachusetts Department of Education regulations, in order to permit service as a Department Chair.

The maximum amount available for any single professional staff member shall be $5,500 over the life of a multi-year program, provided that the District’s total obligation under this section 12.3 shall not exceed $11,000 in any single contract year.

Reimbursement of tuition will be made upon the successful completion of any approved program as evidenced by the submission of a copy of official transcripts and acceptable proof of payment. provided that for an approved multi-year program, reimbursement for the first year’s payment will be made upon submission of transcripts showing successful progress toward completion and proof of payment.

ARTICLE 13

SUMMER PROGRAM

13.1. In the event that the School District authorizes a summer program, the following shall apply:

A)    Such program shall be under School District control.

B)    Personnel of the Concord-Carlisle professional staff will have priority over all others    for the staffing of positions.

C)    All summer pay will be at the rate of $225 per day for all full-time summer programs    (two classes of 1.5 hours each) and $112.50 for one-half day (one class of 1.5 hours).

D)    Summer employees will not be paid for days absent.

ARTICLE 14

PERSONNEL FILE

14.1.    A teacher may, upon request, review the contents of his/her personnel file and make copies of such contents as concern his/her work or himself/herself. A teacher may have at his/her discretion a representative of the Association present during any such review.

14.2.       No material which the Superintendent or supervisor deems derogatory to a teacher’s conduct, service, character, or personality will be placed in such teacher’s personnel file unless such teacher has had an opportunity to review the material. A copy of the material will either be hand delivered to the teacher or sent by certified mail, return receipt requested. The teacher will acknowledge having had the opportunity to review such material by signing the copy to be filed within fourteen (14) calendar days of its receipt. Such signature, however, shall not be deemed to indicate agreement with the contents thereof. Such material, either hand delivered to a teacher or sent to the teacher by certified mail return receipt requested with a signed receipt returned, will be accepted by both parties as proof that the requirements of the school system as outlined in this Article have been fulfilled in the event that the teacher does not sign the material within fourteen (14) days of its receipt. The teacher will also have the right to submit a written answer to such material within thirty (30) working days of its receipt and his/her answer shall be reviewed by the Superintendent and attached to the file copy.

14.3.        Any complaints about a teacher resulting in an adverse entry in the teacher’s personnel file shall be called promptly to the attention of the teacher.

14.4.    The contents of an individual teacher’s personnel file shall be accepted as an accurate record of his/her employment history and shall not be subject to contrary testimony in arbitration under this Agreement or under G.L. Chapter 71, Sections 41 or 42.

ARTICLE 15

LICENSURE

15.1. The “Recertification Process Guidelines for CPS/CCRSD” are to be used by faculty and administration in the review and completion of Individual Professional Development Plans for the purpose of recertification.

15.2 Evaluation for purposes of Commonwealth of Massachusetts teacher certification shall in no way be governed by the provisions of this Agreement and such evaluation shall not be considered in the determination of any personnel action taken or not taken with respect to any teacher other than action directly related to such teacher’s having or not having required certification.

ARTICLE 16

INDEMNIFICATION

16.1.  Rights of indemnification of teachers for expenses in connection with claims and actions brought against them shall be as provided in General Laws, Chapter 258, Section 9.

ARTICLE 17

STAFFING

17.1.   While recognizing that the ultimate determination concerning matters of staffing is reserved to the School District, the parties agree as follows:

17.1.1.  In each of the major academic departments (mathematics, science, social studies, English and foreign languages), it is desirable that the ratio of students to full-time teachers approximates an average of 90 to 1. As this represents a goal for a department and not for any individual teacher, individual teachers within the departments may have more or fewer students than the desired maximum. The School District reserves the right to increase the student teacher ratio up to a maximum of 95:1 in these departments for compelling reasons. It is also understood that in these departments the number of classes per full-time equivalent teacher in any given semester should be 4.

17.1.2.  For the Art Department, the number of assigned classes per full-time teacher will be four. In addition, each Art teacher may be assigned the equivalent of one teaching block in the Art area.

17.1.3.   In the other teaching departments, given the current block schedule, the number of classes assigned per teacher will be 5. For the physical education department, it is desirable that the ratio of students to full-time teachers approximate an average of 220 to 1.

17.1.4.   For the guidance department, it is desirable that the ratio of students to full-time counselors approximate an average of 200 to 1.

17.1.5.  During the school week all full-time faculty members will have 80% of their time scheduled for teaching classes and for student-contact hours such as study hall supervision, science labs, staffing resource rooms, other department centers or for conferencing.

17.1.6.  Part-time teachers are paid 25% of a full-time teacher salary for each class taught.

17.1.7.  For the music department, it is desirable that the ratio of students to full-time teachers approximate an average of 180 to 1.

ARTICLE 18

ABSENCE FROM SCHOOL DUTIES

18.1. TEMPORARY ABSENCE.

18.1.1. Sick Leave. Every member of the professional staff on the 185-day schedule shall be allowed fifteen days’ absence from school duties annually without loss of salary if occasioned by personal illness. For teachers who are not scheduled to work full time, a day of absence shall be prorated in accordance with their teaching schedules. Sick leave shall accumulate from year to year without limit. New employees may begin with a bank of sick leave representing five days for each year of experience not to exceed thirty days.

18.1.1.1.   Sick leave, in addition to personal illness, shall include absence because of illness on the part of a spouse, child, father, mother, or member of the immediate household.

18.1.1.2.  A medical certificate or other suitable evidence may be required for all absences exceeding five consecutive days.

18.1.1.3. Sick Leave Bank. A Sick Leave Bank for use by eligible teachers who have exhausted their own sick leave and who have serious personal illness has been established. A Sick Leave Bank Committee consisting of five (5) members shall administer the Sick Leave Bank. Two (2) members will be designated by the School Committee and three (3) designated by the Association. The operation of the Bank and withdrawal there from shall be carried out in accordance with the following provisions:

A)  Upon hire and thereafter as necessary, each teacher will deposit to the Bank one (1) day of sick leave. Once deposited sick leave days shall become the property of the Bank and may not be withdrawn by the contributing member(s) for any reason other than those set forth below.

B)  All deposits to the Bank will be credited October 1 of each year.

C) Withdrawals may be made only for serious personal illness or accident of the teacher or child bearing leave and applied only during the regular school year (185 days). Days may not be withdrawn to permit a teacher to stay at home for other members of a family.

D) Any member of the Bank who seeks sick leave days from the Bank shall himself/ herself, or by another person authorized to act on his/her behalf, inform in writing the Sick Leave Bank Committee. Copies thereof shall be sent to the president of the Association and to the human resource director setting forth the nature of his/her illness, an estimate of how long such illness shall continue in the school year in which his/her leave has been exhausted, and the number of days that he/she seeks to withdraw from the Bank. Said application shall be accompanied by a written statement of a physician with personal knowledge which shall corroborate the nature of the illness and estimate the degree and duration of same. The Sick Leave Bank Committee shall have the right to request of the applicant additional information as needed for the purpose of reaching a decision in a particular case.

E) The initial grant of sick leave by the Sick Leave Bank Committee to an eligible teacher shall not exceed thirty (30) school days and shall be made according to the following criteria:

1)  adequate medical evidence of serious personal illness

2)  prior utilization of all eligible sick leave

3)  length of service in the Concord-Carlisle Regional School District

4)  propriety in the use of previous sick leave

F) A teacher who is still unable to perform his/her duties after the period for which sick leave has been granted by the Sick Leave Bank Committee may apply for an additional grant. Such request shall be subject to the provisions set forth above. In no case shall any teacher be granted sick leave to extend beyond the school year in which such leave has been granted. No teacher shall be granted sick leave days by the Sick Leave Bank Committee in more than two (2) consecutive school years for the same illness or for more than 185 school days, whichever period is less. During the first year of employment, a teacher may not withdraw more than 90 school days from the Sick Leave Bank.

G) The granting of sick leave by majority vote of the Sick Leave Bank Committee shall be in writing with a copy of such statement being forwarded to the human resource office for inclusion in the teacher’s personnel folder. All decisions of the Sick Leave Bank Committee are final and binding and are not subject to the grievance procedure of this Agreement.

H) The borrower is required to repay 25% of the number of days. In the event of unusual circumstances, this amount may be adjusted by majority vote of the Sick Leave Bank Committee.

I) In the event of depletion of the Bank’s resources, the Sick Leave Bank Committee may recommend to the membership a reassessment of an additional day of contribution. If the Sick Leave Bank balance goes below 900 days, the Sick Leave Bank Committee will notify the Association.

J) In the event of a new contract and/or an extension of the existing one, the balance of days in the Sick Leave Bank are to be carried over to succeeding years.

18.1.2.  Bereavement Leave. Bereavement leave will be granted by the immediate supervisor not to exceed five (5) days. The leave is to be granted without salary deductions in the loss of the following: husband, wife, child, father, mother, brother, sister, grand-parent, or in-law, or member of the teacher’s immediate household. Any other bereavement leave beyond five (5) days shall be taken from sick leave based on the recommendation of the principal and the Superintendent’s approval.

18.1.3.   Personal Business. Each regular employee will be granted annually three days’ absence from school duties for personal business or for other unusual and imperative reasons with no loss of salary. The benefits of this Section shall not be utilized to extend a vacation period. Unused personal business days will be cumulative to six days per teacher. To be eligible for leave without loss of salary, employees must receive approval from their immediate supervisor at least 24 hours before taking such leave (except in case of emergency). Personal business means a matter which cannot be attended to at a time other than when school is in session.

18.1.4.  Leave for Religious Observances. Each regular employee may be granted up to three days’ absence from school duties without loss of salary for the observance of religious holidays not regularly included in the school holiday schedule. If taken, there will be no deduction from the individual’s accumulated sick leave days. Advance notifications to the individual’s immediate supervisor is a prerequisite to the granting of leave for religious observances.

18.1.5.   Professional Leave. Any teacher, upon application and permission of the Principal or his/her designee, may be granted leave not to exceed five days annually to attend conferences or meetings, or to visit schools for professional purposes. Any money beyond expenses received by a teacher on professional leave shall be turned over to the principal for deposit in the department account and will be held there for the remainder of that school year and the following fiscal year to be used for professional activities. If, at the end of such following fiscal year, any such funds remain unexpended, then they shall be moved into the school district's general account. Receipts for all expenditures must be provided to the business office in order to obtain reimbursement.

18.1.6.  Jury Duty. A teacher called to serve on jury duty will be paid the difference between the money received for jury duty less travel allowance and his/her regular pay.

8.2. EXTENDED ABSENCE.

18.2.1.  Military. If a professional staff member is drafted or enlists in the U.S. military service, he/she will be granted a military leave of absence for up to four years.

18.2.2.  Sabbatical Leave.

18.2.2.1. The School Committee will sponsor two types of Sabbatical Leave, Traditional Sabbatical Leave and Alternative Sabbatical Leave. Types of Traditional Sabbatical Leaves include half-year full pay, full year half-pay, and full year and full pay leaves. Types of Alternative Sabbatical Leaves include (but are not limited to) Fractional Load Sabbaticals, Summer Sabbaticals, and Professional Development Sabbaticals.

The School Committee will fund the equivalent of four half-year Sabbaticals. At least one-quarter of this funding will support Alternative Sabbaticals. The remaining three-quarters of this funding will support either one full and one half Traditional Sabbaticals or three half Traditional Sabbaticals. If there are not enough proposals to use the entire funding designated for Traditional Sabbaticals, then whatever money is remaining after the awarding of Traditional Sabbaticals will be added to the funding for Alternative Sabbaticals.

18.2.2.2. Traditional Sabbatical Leave.

A)   Professional staff members may apply for a Traditional Sabbatical Leave for study, research or travel.

B)  Eligibility for sabbaticals shall be based upon total years of service in the system (including military leave, maternity leave or approved leave of absence). After seven years of eligibility have been attained, a professional staff member shall be eligible for a full year sabbatical at one-half pay or a half-year sabbatical at full pay. After ten years of eligibility have been attained, a professional staff member shall be eligible for a full year sabbatical at full pay. Eligibility for subsequent sabbaticals will follow the same time requirements, minus seven years for each one-half sabbatical previously awarded and twelve years for each full year sabbatical awarded prior to July 1, 1989, and ten years for each full year sabbatical thereafter. The salary shall be the regular teaching salary.

C)    Any person awarded a half sabbatical must wait at least two full years before receiving another half sabbatical no matter how many years they have been in the system. Any person awarded a full sabbatical must wait at least four full years before receiving another full sabbatical or two full years before receiving another half sabbatical no matter how many years they have been in the system.

D)   By December 1 of the year prior to the year for which the Traditional Sabbatical Leave is considered, Traditional Sabbatical Application Forms will be prepared by the Superintendent and distributed to staff members. The Superintendent shall not be required to prepare and distribute such forms if he/she has already determined prior to said December 1, based on fiscal constraints or otherwise, that no Traditional Sabbatical Leaves will be granted for that year, provided that the preparation and distribution of such forms shall not oblige the Superintendent to grant any Traditional Sabbatical Leaves.

E)   By December 1 of the year prior to the year for which the Traditional Sabbatical Leave is considered, a Sabbatical Review Committee will be formed consisting of three Association members selected by the Association President; one building administrator; the Superintendent or his/her de-signee; and an ex officio (non-voting) School Committee member.

F)   By December 15, proposals for Traditional Sabbatical Leave will be presented to the Sabbatical Review Committee for consideration.

G)    By January 31, the Sabbatical Review Committee will review all proposals and select the best two (one full and one half) or best three (three halves) for presentation to the Superintendent. Criteria for selection should include, but are not limited to: the value of the sabbatical to the teacher, the length of service of the teacher, and the amount of time since that teacher has received a sabbatical. In addition, all recommended proposals should have demonstrable value to students or the department or the school.

The Superintendent may award such Traditional Sabbatical Leaves as he/she determines in her discretion, but not to exceed one full and one half sabbatical, or three half sabbaticals, not later than

March 1. It is further understood that the deadlines for the process may be changed by mutual agreement of the School Committee and the Association.

18.2.2.3.  Alternative Sabbatical Leave

A)   Professional staff members may apply for Alternative Sabbatical Leave for study, research, travel or any other professional activity of demonstrable value. Alternative Sabbaticals can be different from Traditional Sabbaticals in concept, construct or duration.

B)   Professional staff members are eligible for Alternative Sabbatical Leave after five years of service. They may apply during their fifth year for a leave in their sixth.

C)   By February 1 of the year prior to the year for which the Alternative Sabbatical Leave is considered, Alternative Sabbatical Application Forms will be prepared by the Superintendent and distributed to staff members. The Superintendent shall not be required to prepare and distribute such forms if he/she has already determined prior to said February 1, based on fiscal constraints or otherwise, that no Alternative Sabbatical Leaves will be granted for that year, provided that the preparation and distribution of such forms shall not oblige the Superintendent to grant any Alternative Sabbatical Leaves.

D)   By December 15, proposals for Alternative Sabbatical Leave will be presented to the Sabbatical Review Committee (see 18.2.2.2. E) for consideration.

The Sabbatical Review Committee will review all proposals and select the best for presentation to the Superintendent. Criteria for selection should include, but are not limited to: the value of the sabbatical to the teacher, the length of service of the teacher, and the amount of time since that teacher has received a sabbatical. In addition, all recommended proposals should have demonstrable value to students or the department or the school.

The Superintendent may award such Alternative Sabbatical Leaves as he/she determines in her discretion, but not to exceed one half sabbatical, not later than April 15. It is further understood that the deadlines for the process may be changed by mutual agreement of the School Committee and the Association

18.2.2.4.  The granting of a Sabbatical Leave shall be dependent upon the staff member entering into a written agreement with the School District that upon termination of such leave he/she will return to service in the public schools of the Region for a period equal to twice the length of such leave, and that, in default of completing such service, he/she will refund to the Region an amount equal to such proportion of salary received by him/her while on leave as the amount of service not actually rendered as agreed bears to the whole amount of service agreed to be rendered.

18.2.2.5.  The period of leave will be considered a period of teaching for purposes of measuring teaching experience for salary determination. Sabbatical Leave will not affect tenure or other benefits earned as a member of the staff.

18.2.2.6.  During the course of Sabbatical Leave, brief monthly reports of progress shall be made to the Superintendent.

18.3. CHILD-BEARING AND CHILD-REARING LEAVE.

18.3.1. Teachers who are disabled from working because of pregnancy or recovery therefrom may apply unused sick leave, in accordance with Section 18.1. Temporary Absence, for those days on which they are unable to work.

18.3.2.  Child-Bearing Leave. Any female teacher shall be granted, upon request to the Superintendent, a leave of absence without pay for reasons of child bearing. Such leave shall not exceed eight (8) weeks. Teachers on Child-Bearing Leave may apply unused sick leave for those days on which they are unable to work as a result of pregnancy or recovery therefrom. In cases of use of unused sick leave, Section 18.1. Temporary Absence, shall apply.

18.3.2.1.   Parenting Leave. Any teacher shall be granted, upon written request to the superintendent, a maximum of two weeks' leave following the birth of his or her child, inclusive of school vacation weeks and summer break. Available unused sick leave may be applied to these two weeks provided the two weeks occur during the contracted 185 days. Parenting leave is only available during the school year in which the child is born. Such leave shall be coterminous with (and shall not extend or be in addition to) any other leave (such as FMLA leave, leave under the Massachusetts Maternity Leave Act, or leave under Section 18.3.3 of this Agreement).

18.3.2.2.   Adoption Leave. Any teacher shall be granted, upon request to the Superintendent, a leave of absence without pay immediately following a placement for adoption or for travel necessary to complete adoption. Such leave shall not exceed eight (8) weeks. Teachers on Adoption Leave may apply unused sick leave for those days on which they are on leave.

18.3.3.   Child-Rearing Leave. Any teacher may be granted a leave of absence without pay for up to three full semesters immediately following childbirth or adoption. Scheduled returns from such child-rearing leaves shall occur at the beginning of a semester unless otherwise agreed upon by the teacher and the Superintendent. Leaves may exceed three consecutive full semesters if agreed upon by the teacher and the Superintendent.

A teacher returning from Child-Rearing Leave may request to fill an existing vacancy (a position that must be posted and/or advertised) of lesser equivalence in the discipline that he/she left for the remainder of the school year rather than an immediate return to his/her former equivalency. He/she may fill said vacancy for a maximum of two (2) school years, if such vacancy exists, without affecting his/her rights to return to his/her former equivalency.

If a teacher has his/her teaching load increased because of another teacher’s leaving for Child-Rearing Leave, the teacher whose load is increased shall sign a statement acknowledging the reason for the temporary increased load and an agreement to voluntarily reduce himself/herself if necessary when the teacher on Child-Rearing Leave returns. All teachers whether on leave or not will receive equal consideration with respect to reduction-in-force.

18.4. VOLUNTARY LEAVES OF ABSENCE.

18.4.1.   Upon application, consistent with School Committee Policy, of a member of the professional staff and upon the recommendation of the principal, after consideration of the merits of the request, the Superintendent may grant a full or partial leave of absence. Written application for leaves of absence must be submitted before July 1 of the year in which leave is requested. Requests submitted after the deadline date will be considered only in the event of extraordinary circumstances as determined by the Superintendent. During a leave of absence, a teacher will receive no salary, no Region payment of insurance plans, or other benefits. A teacher on leave of absence will receive the same consideration with respect to reduction-in-force and future staffing plans as if he/she were actively teaching and not on leave.

18.4.2.   Salary credit for the year of leave of absence is at the discretion of the Superintendent upon the recommendation of the principal. Persons granted leaves of absence by the Superintendent who are on leave on January 1 must inform the Superintendent by February 1 of the year in which they intend to return or the teacher’s service will be considered terminated at the end of the school year for which the leave was granted.

18.4.3. A teacher’s insurance plan will be continued during the period of any unpaid leave of absence (including a maternity leave), provided the teacher pays the total monthly cost of such coverage to the Region by the seventh (7th) of each month.

18.5.    ADDITIONAL LEAVE. At the discretion of the Superintendent, additional leave may be granted beyond normal sick leave and other leave provisions of the current policy.

18.6.   ABSENCES REQUIRING SALARY DEDUCTION. Extended absence owing to personal illness in excess of sick leave allowance shall carry a salary deduction equal to the actual cost of substitute services. Absences for reasons other than personal illness or serious emergency shall carry a deduction of 1/185th of annual salary for each day of such absence for all personnel engaged for the period of the school year.

18.7.  THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993. Upon receipt of an application, the Superintendent shall approve a maximum of twelve (12) weeks unpaid, job protected leave each year for specified family and medical reasons consistent with the FMLA. For purposes of the FMLA, the year is defined as the twelve (12) consecutive months immediately preceding the requested leave date.

ARTICLE 19

DEPARTMENT CHAIR POSITIONS

19.1.    An appointment to a department chairpersonship shall be for a three-year period, subject to an annual review by the Principal and a determination by him/her that the incumbent is meeting the goals and objectives established for the incumbent by the Principal in consultation with members of the department as described below. Members of a department, at their option, may participate in the process of nominating candidates for department chair positions. Should they desire to recommend a nominee, they shall first consult with the Principal concerning goals and objectives for the department and its chairperson and other relevant matters. Thereafter, but prior to May 1, the name of a nominee may be presented to the Principal for his/her consideration. If the Principal chooses to approve a different nominee, he/she shall so advise the department. The Principal shall have the ultimate decision as to who shall be appointed to department chair positions.

19.2.    If in the procedure outlined in Section 19.1 the Superintendent should appoint an incumbent chairperson to a succeeding term, the following shall apply:

A)   The incumbent shall resign the chair position with an effective date no later than June 25.

B)   The succeeding term shall begin no earlier than July 25.

C)   Prior to reassuming the chair position, the resigned chairperson shall sign a statement acknowledging that the interruption of service as chairperson prevent his/her gaining tenure in that position.

19.3.    If an incumbent chairperson declines to sign a statement as described in 19.2.C. and if the Superintendent proceeds to appoint the person to a succeeding term, then the Association reserves its rights to challenge such appointment if it feels it was in violation of this Agreement.

ARTICLE 20

TAX SHELTERED ANNUITIES

20.1. By request of the individual concerned and his/her authorization for salary deduction, tax-sheltered annuities are authorized by the School District to be purchased for a member of the professional staff.

ARTICLE 21

GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE

21.1.     A professional staff member who believes that he/she is aggrieved by a violation of the Agreement shall discuss the matter with his/her immediate supervisor within thirty (30) school days of the time the employee should reasonably have known that he/she may be aggrieved. The immediate supervisor shall render a decision within fourteen (14) calendar days.

21.2.     If the grievance is not settled to the satisfaction of the employee, he/she may present the grievance to the principal in writing within fourteen (14) calendar days, after the decision of the immediate supervisor is due. Prior to submitting the appeal, the grievant may discuss the matter with the Professional Rights and Responsibilities (PR&R) Committee of the Association. Such grievance shall be submitted on a form (see Appendix B) reciting, at a minimum, the nature of the violation alleged, the article or articles of the agreement alleged to have been violated, and the remedy sought, and providing spaces to reflect subsequent steps in the grievance process.

21.3.     In the case of a written grievance, within fourteen (14) calendar days of the receipt of the statement, the principal shall review the appeal, discuss the matter with the grievant and the immediate supervisor and render a written decision.

21.4.     If the grievance is not settled to the satisfaction of the employee, the grievance may be appealed in writing to the Superintendent within fourteen (14) calendar days after the principal’s decision is due.

21.5.    The Superintendent shall meet with the employee, and if the employee so chooses, a representative of the Association, within thirty (30) calendar days after receipt of the written grievance. The Superintendent shall provide his/her decision in writing to the employee within fourteen (14) calendar days after the conclusion of the meeting.

21.6.     Any time interval specified herein may be extended by mutual agreement. If the answer at any step is not provided within the specified time limits, the grievance shall be deemed denied on the day the decision was due and the grievance shall be qualified to be carried to the next higher level. If an individual’s grievance is once settled or if it is not presented within the time limits specified herein, it shall be considered closed and shall not thereafter be subject to the grievance procedure or to arbitration hereunder.

21.7.       If the grievant is dissatisfied with the Superintendent’s decision, he/she may file an appeal with the School Committee within fourteen (14) calendar days following receipt of the Superintendent’s decision. The School Committee at its sole discretion will determine whether or not to hear the appeal.

ARTICLE 22

ARBITRATION

22.1.       In the event the Association elects to submit a grievance to arbitration, the arbitrator shall be selected according to, and shall be governed by, the procedure set forth in this Article. The Association must notify the Superintendent in writing of its intention to arbitrate within thirty (30) calendar days following receipt of the Committee’s decision on the grievance.

22.2.      The arbitrator shall be selected by mutual agreement of the parties. If the parties cannot agree within fourteen (14) calendar days after receipt by the Superintendent of written notice that the Association intends to arbitrate, the Association may, within twenty (20) calendar days after such receipt refer the grievance to the American Arbitration Association. The arbitrator shall be selected in accordance with the then current rules of the American Arbitration Association applicable to labor arbitrations. Any arbitration hereunder shall be conducted in accordance with such rules, subject to the provisions of this Agreement. The School District and the Association shall share equally in compensation and expenses of the arbitrator.

22.3.    The School District shall have standing to question arbitrability.

22.4.     The function of the arbitrator is to determine the interpretation and application of specific provisions of this Agreement. There shall be no right in arbitration to obtain, and no arbitrator shall have any authority or power to award or determine any change in, modification or alteration of, addition to, or detraction from, any of the provisions of this Agreement. No arbitrator shall set aside any action of the School District involving the exercise of judgment unless the Association establishes that there was no reasonable basis for such judgment, and the arbitrator shall be subject to the principle that there are no restrictions intended on the rights or authority of the School District other than those expressly set forth in this Agreement. The arbitrator may or may not make his/her award retroactive as the equities of the case may require. Each grievance shall be separately processed in any arbitration proceedings hereunder unless the parties otherwise agree. The arbitrator shall furnish a written opinion specifying the reasons for his/her decision. The decision of the arbitrator, if within the scope of his/her authority and power under this Agreement, shall be final and binding upon the School District, and the Association and the teacher(s) involved in the grievance.

ARTICLE 23

SCHOOL CALENDAR

23.1. The Calendar Committee will be comprised of representatives of the Association and representatives of the School Committee and these two parties will perform the following functions:

23.1.1.  The representatives will develop the calendar through a series of joint meetings.

23.1.2.  After tentative agreement has been reached, Association representatives will determine if the proposed calendar has the support of a majority of the members of the Concord-Carlisle Teachers’ Association.

23.1.3.  If mutual agreement exists, the calendar proposal will be forwarded to the School Committee for consideration. In the event mutual agreement cannot be reached, Association    representatives and School Committee representatives will each present their recommendations for a workable calendar to the School Committee.

23.1.4.  The final decision will rest with the School Committee.

23.2. The beginning of school for teachers shall occur no earlier than the dates specified on the following chart:

Labor Day Date

Earliest School Start Date For Teachers

1-Sep

Mon, 25 Aug

2-Sep

Mon, 26 Aug

3-Sep

Mon, 27 Aug

4-Sep

Mon, 28 Aug

5-Sep

Thur, 25 Aug

6 Sep

Thur, 26 Aug

7 Sep

Thur, 27 Aug

ARTICLE 24

CONSULTATION ON PROFESSIONAL CONCERNS

24.1.   The Superintendent or his/her representative shall meet at least once each month with the President of the Concord-Carlisle Teachers’ Association or his/her representative. Other members of the Administration or Association may be present, upon mutual agreement. Dates for these meetings will be mutually determined.

24.2.   The Principal shall meet at least once each month with three members of the Association’s Executive Board, designated by the President. Dates for these meetings will be mutually determined.

24.3.   Upon agreement by the Superintendent, Principal, and Association President, the meetings called for in Section 24.1. and 24.2. may be combined in any given month.

24.4.   The President and Vice-President of the Association will be released from supervisory duties commencing with their election to office for the duration of their term.

ARTICLE 25

REDUCTION-IN-STAFF

25.1.    The School Committee retains the right to reduce the number of teachers on its staff within the staffing philosophy expressed in other sections of this contract. The decision to reduce staff shall not be subject to the grievance and arbitration procedures of this contract. As between teachers with professional teacher status and teachers without professional teacher status, the provisions of applicable law shall apply with respect to reductions in staff.

25.2.    The order in which teachers are dismissed from a discipline under RIF will be determined by seniority. The provisions of this Article also apply to circumstances involving the reduction of full-time teachers with professional teacher status to part-time status.

25.3.   If the School Committee decides to effect a reduction-in-force, the order of reduction of teachers in a given discipline shall be reduced in order of seniority until the number has been met.

25.4.  DEFINITIONS:

25.4.1.  Discipline. For the purposes of this Article, discipline will normally coincide with department such as, but not limited to:

English                                       Mathematics

Foreign Language                   Social Studies

Science                                    Art Business, etc.

The School Committee may, at its sole discretion, broaden or narrow this concept if it deems that the needs of the system so require. Examples of a narrowed concept would include but not be limited to:

French; Spanish; Latin

Chemistry/Biology; etc.

25.4.2.  Seniority. For purposes of this Article, seniority shall mean continuous employment in the Concord-Carlisle Regional School District in years, months, and calendar days, including any periods of authorized leave of absence. The following procedure will be used to resolve ties in length of service:

A) Total number of years, or fractions thereof, of teaching service in Concord-Carlisle Regional School District.

B)    Total number of years, or fractions thereof, of teaching service in the Concord-Carlisle Regional School District and the Concord Public Schools.

C)   A lottery to be held in September of every school year in which teachers who begin their employment in the same year. Teachers who are hired later in the year will be assigned subsequent numbers of lesser seniority.

D)   Seniority determined by annual lotteries or the 1989 lottery shall not be subject to grievance procedures.

25.4.3.  Lay-off. Lay-off means an involuntary unpaid leave of absence to be granted by the School District for a period of two years, provided that said teacher has waived, in, writing, subsequent to receipt of a notice of reduction-in-force, any present or future rights to a dismissal hearing he/she may have pursuant to Chapter 71, Section 42 and 43A of the Massachusetts General Laws. See Waiver Form, page 31.

25.4.4.   Recall. Recall means the right to return to a position in the discipline from which a teacher was originally laid off in the reverse order in which said teacher was laid off. The Superintendent must decide on each lay off individually and the order of lay off shall be established by the sequence in which the decisions were made. An up-to-date list of recall order by discipline shall be maintained by the Superintendent and shall be available to the Association upon request.

25.4.5.  Terminated. Terminated means dismissed pursuant to Chapter 71, Section 42.

25.4.6.  Vacancy. A vacancy for purposes of returning a laid-off teacher who has been recalled to active service shall exist only after the School District has met any other obligations it has pursuant to any other provision of this Agreement and any state law.

25.4.7.   Minimal Qualifications. Minimal Qualifications means the specific certification, professional training, experience and skills which the School District in its sole discretion establishes for a position.

25.5.   NOTIFICATION. Under normal circumstances, a teacher so identified for a reduction in force shall be notified by June 15 of the school year preceding the school year in which the reduction is to be effected. In the event of a reduction in state or federal revenues occurring after June 15 such that the need for reduction in force is not determined by the School District until after that date, then the School District shall notify a teacher so identified as soon as practicable once the School District has determined the need for such a reduction, which shall then be effective as of the date determined by the School District. If the teacher wishes to have lay-off status (rather than termination) said teacher must so notify the Superintendent, in writing, within ten (10) school days of the receipt of the RIF notice.

25.6.  RECALL. If subsequent to a RIF notice, a vacancy occurs in a discipline from which teachers have been reduced and elected lay-off status, a recall notice shall be sent via certified mail

to the teacher most recently reduced from the discipline in which the vacancy exists.

25.6.1.   If a teacher fails to notify the Superintendent within fourteen (14) calendar days of the issuance of a recall notice of his/her intent to accept recall, said teacher shall forfeit all rights and benefits provided for in this Agreement.

25.6.2.   A teacher who declines recall to less than a full year position will remain on the recall list. A teacher who declines recall to a full year, full time position shall forfeit all rights and benefits provided for in this Agreement.

25.6.3.  A teacher who accepts recall must commence work on the date set forth in the recall notice or within twenty-one (21) calendar days, whichever is later. A teacher who accepts recall shall have all benefits accrued up to June 30th of the school year in which the RIF notice was given restored upon recall.

25.6.4.   Teachers with recall benefits are required to keep the Superintendent informed of their current mailing address.

25.6.5.   Teachers who have been laid-off shall be given preference on the substitute list should they so desire.

25.6.6.  The effect on teachers with professional teacher status of a lay-off shall be determined in accordance with applicable law.

25.7.  REDUCTION-IN-FORCE TRANSFER PROCESS.

25.7.1.  A teacher identified for reduction-in-force may request in writing a transfer to a position, involving no greater full-time equivalency than the position held by the teacher immediately prior to the receipt of the RIF notice in another discipline where a teacher with no professional teacher status is employed or a vacancy exists. This request shall be addressed to the Human Resource Office with a copy to the principal. This process is available to a teacher with professional teacher status identified for reduction-in-force (“RIF”) exclusively during the period beginning with the teacher’s receipt of a RIF notice Superintendent’s letter) and ending with the effective date of the teacher’s RIF, as specified in the Superintendent’s RIF decision, but in any event no sooner than June 30 of the school year in which the RIF notice is issued. The execution of an employment status waiver from (Appendix A to the Agreement) does not extend the period during which a teacher with professional teacher status identified for RIF may utilize the RIF Transfer Process beyond the effective date of said teacher’s RIF (or June 30, if later).

25.7.2.   The department chairperson or coordinator of the potential receiving discipline and the principal shall meet with the teacher requesting the transfer. The purpose of such meeting is to interview the teacher requesting the transfer to determine if that teacher has the minimal qualifications beyond certification to maintain the discipline standards as they presently exist. If it is determined that the teacher is minimally qualified, the transfer shall be permitted. If it is determined that the teacher is not minimally qualified, the transfer will be denied.

25.7.3. The affected teacher with professional teacher status may appeal to the Superintendent and/or designee.

ARTICLE 26

TEACHER EMERITUS PROGRAM

26.1.     The intent of this provision is to create the position of Teacher Emeritus, a position which provides the opportunity of a teacher retired from the CCRSD to continue his/her employment in the school system in an honorary capacity subject to the stipulations listed below. The creation of this position can provide a benefit to the teacher, a financial saving to the Region, an opportunity for employment and/or career advancement to other teachers, and an opportunity for the Region to benefit from the experience and expertise of the retiree.

26.2.     The provisions of the Teacher Emeritus Program are as follows:

26.2.1.  A teacher must have been employed a minimum of 15 years in the CCRSD.

26.2.2.  A retired teacher can be employed as a Teacher Emeritus for a maximum period of 3 years. These years need not be consecutive.

26.2.3.  A Teacher Emeritus may teach the equivalent of no more than 2 classes per year.

26.2.4.   Each Teacher Emeritus on the 185 day schedule shall be allowed 15 days absence from school duties of occasioned by personal illness without loss of salary and three personal leave days. For teachers who are not scheduled to work full time, a day of absence shall be prorated in accordance with their teaching schedules. These sick leave and personal leave days are not cumulative and Teachers Emeritus are not eligible for the provisions of unused sick leave Article 18 of the Sick Leave Bank (Article 18.1.1.3.).

26.3.    The position of Teacher Emeritus shall have no negative impact on the bargaining unit and/or its individual members. The employment of a Teacher Emeritus shall not cause the lay-off of any bargaining unit member, nor shall it cause the reduction of any bargaining unit member from a full to a fractional position or from a fractional position to a smaller fractional position. No bargaining unit position shall be eliminated due to the employment of a Teacher Emeritus.

26.4.   Should a Teacher Emeritus leave the service of CCRSD during a year of employment, the position which he or she held shall continue to be a bargaining-unit-position and shall be filled pursuant to existing practice and policy.

ARTICLE 27

CRIMINAL OFFENDER RECORD INFORMATION (CORI)

27.1. In compliance with the provisions of Chapter 385 of the Acts of 2002, the Superintendent of Schools shall request and review criminal background checks through the Massachusetts Criminal History Systems Board (“CORI reports”). Such checks shall not take place more than once every three (3) years, more or less, unless there are allegations of employee misconduct made by or to law enforcement agencies or courts warranting additional CORI reports, or unless a more frequent report is required to bring a particular employee onto any regular cycle or schedule on which such reports are routinely sought by the district with respect to other employees.

Employees shall be made aware that CORI reports concerning them are being requested and when such request is actually made. Employees, upon request, shall be provided with a copy of the CORI report received by the Superintendent.

All CORI reports shall be kept in a separate secure file maintained in the District’s central offices. CORI reports shall be destroyed at the times required by law. Even after retirement or termination of employment copies of any then-existing reports may be requested by an employee and shall be provided.

After review of a CORI report, the Superintendent or his/her designated appropriate administrator may meet with the employee who may, at such meeting, be represented by the Association. Any and all personnel actions resulting from information acquired from a CORI report shall be conducted pursuant to the provisions of the Collective Bargaining Agreement, any applicable School Committee policy and the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

ARTICLE 28

DISCIPLINE & DISCHARGE

28.1      No teacher shall be reprimanded, reduced in rank or compensation, or deprived of any professional advantage without good cause. In the case of a disciplinary suspension or termination, a teacher’s exclusive remedy shall be provided under applicable law, and there will be no separate recourse under this Agreement.

28.2      The Association recognizes the responsibility of members of the administration to reprimand teachers for delinquency of professional performance. The Association also acknowledges that nothing in this Article prohibits or restricts the filing of letters, memoranda or other written material which might aid in making a subsequent objective evaluation.

ARTICLE 29

EVALUATION

Table of Contents

(1)

Purpose of Educator  Evaluation

34

(2)

Definitions

34

(3)

Evidence Used in Evaluation

38

(4)

Rubric

39

(5)

Evaluation Cycle: Training

40

(6)

Evaluation Cycle: Annual Orientation

40

(7)

Evaluation Cycle: Self-Assessment

40

(8)

Evaluation Cycle: Goal Setting and Educator Plan Development

41

(9)

Evaluation Cycle : Observation of Practice and Examination of Artifacts – Educators without PTS

42

(10)

Evaluation Cycle: Observation of Practice and Examination of Artifacts – Educators with PTS

42

(11)

Observations

42

(12)

Evaluation Cycle: Formative Assessment

43

(13)

Evaluation Cycle : Formative Evaluation for Two-Year Self-Directed Plans Only

44

(14)

Evaluation Cycle: Summative Evaluation…

45

(15)

Educator Plans : General

46

(16)

Educator Plans: Developing Educator Plan

46

(17)

Educator Plans: Self-Directed Growth Plan

46

(18)

Educator Plans: Directed Growth Plan

47

(19)

Educator Plans: Improvement Plan

47

(20)

Timelines

49

(21)

Career Advancement

53

(22)

Rating Impact on Student Learning Growth

53

(23)

Using Student feedback in Educator Evaluation

53

 (24)

Using Staff feedback in Educator Evaluation

53

(25)

General Provision

53

The following forms are in APPENDIX D

•   Self-Assessment Form

•   Goal Setting and Plan Form

•   Formative Assessment Report Form

•   Formative Evaluation Report Form

•   Summative Evaluation Report Form

•   Observation Feedback Form

Appendix E – Teacher Rubric

Appendix F – SISP Rubric

Appendix  G – Department Chair Rubric

Appendix H – SISP Department Chair Rubric

1)        Purpose of Educator Evaluation

A)       This contract language is locally negotiated and based on M.G.L., c.71, § 38; M.G.L. c.150E; the Educator Evaluation regulations, 603 CMR 35.00 et seq.; and the Model System for Educator Evaluation developed and which may be updated from time to time by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. See 603 CMR 35.02 (definition of model system). In the event of a conflict between this collective bargaining agreement and the governing laws and regulations, the laws and regulations will prevail.

B)       The regulatory purposes of evaluation are:

i) To promote student learning, growth, and achievement by providing Educators with feedback for improvement, enhanced opportunities for professional growth, and clear structures for accountability, 603 CMR 35.01(2)(a);

ii) To provide a record of facts and assessments for personnel decisions, 35.01(2)(b);

iii) To ensure that every school committee has a system to enhance the professionalism and accountability of teachers and administrators that will enable them to assist all students to perform at high levels, 35.01(3); and

iv) To assure effective teaching and administrative leadership, 35.01(3).

2)        Definitions (* indicates definition is generally based on 603 CMR 35.02)

A)         *Artifacts of Professional Practice: Products of an Educator’s work and student work samples that demonstrate the Educator’s knowledge and skills with respect to specific performance standards.

B)         Caseload Educator: Educators who teach or counsel individual or small groups of students through consultation with the regular classroom teacher, for example, school nurses, guidance counselors, speech and language pathologists, and some reading specialists and special education teachers.

C)         Classroom teacher: Educators who teach preK-12 whole classes, and teachers of special subjects as such as art, music, library, and physical education. May also include special education teachers and reading specialists who teach whole classes.

D)         Categories of Evidence: Multiple measures of student learning, growth, and achievement, judgments based on observations and artifacts of professional practice, including unannounced observations of practice of any duration; and additional evidence relevant to one or more Standards of Effective Teaching Practice (603 CMR 35.03).

E)         *District-determined Measures: Measures of student learning, growth and achievement related to the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks, Massachusetts Vocational Technical Education Frameworks, or other relevant frameworks, that are comparable across grade or subject level district-wide. These measures may include, but shall not be limited to: portfolios approved commercial assessments and district-developed pre and post unit and course assessments, and capstone projects.

F)         *Educator(s): Inclusive term that applies to all classroom teachers and caseload educators, unless otherwise noted.

G)         *Educator Plan: The growth or improvement actions identified as part of each Educator’s evaluation. The type of plan is determined by the Educator’s career stage, overall performance rating, and the rating of impact on student learning, growth and achievement. There shall be four types of Educator Plans:

i) Developing Educator Plan shall mean a plan developed by the Educator and the Evaluator for one school year or less for an Educator without Professional Teacher Status (PTS); or, at the discretion of an Evaluator, for an Educator with PTS in a new assignment.

ii) Self-Directed Growth Plan shall mean a plan developed by the Educator for one or two school years for Educators with PTS who are rated proficient or exemplary.

iii) Directed Growth Plan shall mean a plan developed by the Educator and the Evaluator of one school year or less for Educators with PTS who are rated needs improvement.

iv) Improvement Plan shall mean a plan developed by the Evaluator of at least 30 calendar days and no more than one school year for Educators with PTS who are rated unsatisfactory with goals specific to improving the Educator’s unsatisfactory performance. In those cases where an Educator is rated unsatisfactory near the close of a school year, the plan may include activities during the summer preceding the next school year.

H)    *ESE: The Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.

I)     *Evaluation: The ongoing process of defining goals and identifying, gathering, and using information as part of a process to improve professional performance (the “formative evaluation” and “formative assessment”) and to assess total job effectiveness and make personnel decisions (the “summative evaluation”).

J)    *Evaluator: Any person designated by a superintendent who has primary or supervisory responsibility for observation and evaluation. The superintendent is responsible for ensuring that all Evaluators have training in the principles of supervision and evaluation. Each Educator will have one primary Evaluator at any one time responsible for determining performance ratings.

i) Primary Evaluator shall be the person who determines the Educator’s performance ratings and evaluation.

ii) Supervising Evaluator shall be the person responsible for developing the Educator Plan, supervising the Educator’s progress through formative assessments, evaluating the Educator’s progress toward attaining the Educator Plan goals, and making recommendations about the evaluation ratings to the primary Evaluator at the end of the Educator Plan. The Supervising Evaluator may be the primary Evaluator or his/her designee.

iii)Teaching Staff Assigned to More Than One Building: Each Educator who is assigned to more than one building will be evaluated by the appropriate administrator where the individual is assigned most of the time. The principal of each building in which the Educator serves must review and sign the evaluation, and may add written comments. In cases where there is no predominate assignment, the superintendent will determine who the primary evaluator will be.

iv) Notification: The Educator shall be notified in writing of his/her primary Evaluator and supervising Evaluator, if any, at the outset of each new evaluation cycle. The Evaluator(s) may be changed upon notification in writing to the Educator.

K)    Evaluation Cycle: A five-component process that all Educators follow consisting of 1) Self-Assessment; 2) Goal-setting and Educator Plan development; 3) Implementation of the Plan; 4) Formative Assessment/Evaluation; and 5) Summative Evaluation.

L)    *Experienced Educator: An educator with Professional Teacher Status (PTS).

M)   *Family: Includes students’ parents, legal guardians, foster parents, or primary caregivers.

N)    *Formative Assessment: The process used to assess progress towards attaining goals set forth in Educator plans, performance on standards, or both. This process may take place at any time(s) during the cycle of evaluation, but typically takes place at mid-cycle.

O)    *Formative Evaluation: An evaluation conducted at the end of Year 1 for an Educator on a 2-year Self-Directed Growth plan which is used to arrive at a rating on progress towards attaining the goals set forth in the Educator Plan, performance on Standards and Indicators of Effective Teaching Practice, or both.

P)    *Goal: A specific, actionable, and measurable area of improvement as set forth in an Educator’s plan. A goal may pertain to any or all of the following: Educator practice in relation to Performance Standards, Educator practice in relation to indicators, or specified improvement in student learning, growth and achievement. Goals may be developed by individual Educators, by the Evaluator, or by teams, departments, or groups of Educators who have the same role.

Q) *Measurable: That which can be classified or estimated in relation to a scale, rubric, or standards.

R) Multiple Measures of Student Learning: Measures must include a combination of classroom, school and district assessments, student growth percentiles on state assessments, if state assessments are available, and student MEPA gain scores. This definition may be revised as required by regulations or agreement of the parties upon issuance of ESE guidance expected by July 2012.

S)    *Observation: A data gathering process that includes notes and judgments made during one or more classroom or worksite visits(s) of any duration by the Evaluator and may include examination of artifacts of practice including student work. An observation may occur in person or through video. Video observations will be done openly and with knowledge of the Educator. The parties agree to bargain the protocols of video observations should either party wish to adopt such practice. Classroom or worksite observations conducted pursuant to this article must result in feedback to the Educator. Normal supervisory responsibilities of department, building and district administrators will also cause administrators to drop in on classes and other activities in the worksite at various times as deemed necessary by the administrator. Carrying out these supervisory responsibilities, when they do not result in targeted and constructive feedback to the Educator, are not observations as defined in this Article.

T)    Parties: The parties to this agreement are the local school committee and the employee organization that represents the Educators covered by this agreement for purposes of collective bargaining (“Employee Organization/Association”).

U)    *Performance Rating: Describes the Educator’s performance on each performance standard and overall. There shall be four performance ratings:

•     Exemplary: the Educator’s performance consistently and significantly exceeds the requirements of a standard or overall. The rating of exemplary on a standard indicates that practice significantly exceeds proficient and could serve as a model of practice on that standard district-wide.

•     Proficient: the Educator’s performance fully and consistently meets the requirements of a standard or overall. Proficient practice is understood to be fully satisfactory.

•     Needs Improvement: the Educator’s performance on a standard or overall is below the requirements of a standard or overall, but is not considered to be unsatisfactory at this time. Improvement is necessary and expected.

•     Unsatisfactory: the Educator’s performance on a standard or overall has not significantly improved following a rating of needs improvement, or the Educator’s performance is consistently below the requirements of a standard or overall and is considered inadequate, or both.

V)    *Performance Standards: Locally developed standards and indicators pursuant to M.G.L. c. 71, § 38 and consistent with, and supplemental to 603 CMR 35.00. The parties may agree to limit standards and indicators to those set forth in 603 CMR 35.03.

W)   *Professional Teacher Status: PTS is the status granted to an Educator pursuant to M.G.L. c. 71, § 41.

X)    Rating of Educator Impact on Student Learning: A rating of high, moderate or low based on trends and patterns on state assessments and district-determined measures. The parties will negotiate the process for using state and district-determined measures to arrive at an Educator’s rating of impact on student learning, growth and achievement, using guidance and model contract language from ESE, expected by July 2012.

Y)    Rating of Overall Educator Performance: The Educator’s overall performance rating is based on the Evaluator’s professional judgment and examination of evidence of the Educator’s performance against the four Performance Standards and the Educator’s attainment of goals set forth in the Educator Plan, as follows:

i) Standard 1: Curriculum, Planning and Assessment

ii) Standard 2: Teaching All Students

iii) Standard 3: Family and Community Engagement

iv) Standard 4: Professional Culture

v) Attainment of Professional Practice Goal(s)

vi) Attainment of Student Learning Goal(s)

Z)    *Rubric: A scoring tool that describes characteristics of practice or artifacts at different levels of performance. The rubrics for Standards and Indicators of Effective Teaching Practice are used to rate Educators on Performance Standards, these rubrics consists of:

i) Standards: Describes broad categories of professional practice, including those required in 603 CMR 35.03

ii) Indicators: Describes aspects of each standard, including those required in 603 CMR 35.03

iii) Elements: Defines the individual components under each indicator

iv) Descriptors: Describes practice at four levels of performance for each element

AA)  *Summative Evaluation: An evaluation used to arrive at a rating on each standard, an overall rating, and as a basis to make personnel decisions. The summative evaluation includes the Eval-uator’s judgments of the Educator’s performance against Performance Standards and the Educator’s attainment of goals set forth in the Educator’s Plan.

BB)  *Superintendent: The person employed by the school committee pursuant to M.G.L. c. 71 §59 and §59A. The superintendent is responsible for the implementation of 603 CMR 35.00.

CC)  *Teacher: An Educator employed in a position requiring a certificate or license as described in 603 CMR 7.04(3)(a, b, and d) and in the area of vocational education as provided in 603 CMR 4.00. Teachers may include, for example, classroom teachers, librarians, guidance counselors, or school nurses.

DD)  *Trends in student learning: At least two years of data from the district-determined measures and state assessments used in determining the Educator’s rating on impact on student learning as high, moderate or low.

3)   Evidence Used In Evaluation

The following categories of evidence shall be used in evaluating each Educator:

A)    Multiple measures of student learning, growth, and achievement, which shall include:

i) Measures of student progress on classroom assessments that are aligned with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks or other relevant frameworks and are comparable within grades or subjects in a school;

ii) At least two district-determined measures of student learning related to the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks or the Massachusetts Vocational Technical Education Frameworks or other relevant frameworks that are comparable across grades and/or subjects district-wide. These measures may include: portfolios, approved commercial assessments and district-developed pre and post unit and course assessments, and capstone projects. One such measure shall be the MCAS Student Growth Percentile (SGP) or Massachusetts English Proficiency Assessment gain scores, if applicable, in which case at least two years of data is required.

iii) Measures of student progress and/or achievement toward student learning goals set between the Educator and Evaluator for the school year or some other period of time established in the Educator Plan.

iv) For Educators whose primary role is not as a classroom teacher, the appropriate measures of the Educator’s contribution to student learning, growth, and achievement set by the district. The measures set by the district should be based on the Educator’s role and responsibility.

B)   Judgments based on observations and artifacts of practice including:

i) Unannounced observations of practice of any duration.

ii) Announced observation(s) for non-PTS Educators in their first year of practice in a school, Educators on Improvement Plans, and as determined by the Evaluator.

iii) Examination of Educator work products.

iv) Examination of student work samples.

C) Evidence relevant to one or more Performance Standards, including but not limited to:

i) Evidence compiled and presented by the Educator, including:

(a) Evidence of fulfillment of professional responsibilities and growth such as self-assessments, peer collaboration, professional development linked to goals in the Educator plans, contributions to the school community and professional culture;

(b) Evidence of active outreach to and engagement with families; ii) Evidence of progress towards professional practice goal(s);

iii) Evidence of progress toward student learning outcomes goal(s).

iv) Student and Staff Feedback – see # 23-24, below; and

v) Any other relevant evidence from any source that the Evaluator shares with the Educator. Other relevant evidence could include information provided by other administrators such as the superintendent.

4)   Rubrics

Teachers - Appendix E

Specialized Instructional Support Personnel – Appendix F

Department Chairs – Appendix G

Specialized Instructional Support personnel Department Chairs – Appendix H

5)        Evaluation Cycle: Training

A)   Prior to the implementation of the new evaluation process contained in this article, districts shall arrange training for all Educators, principals, and other evaluators that outlines the components of the new evaluation process and provides an explanation of the evaluation cycle. The district through the superintendent shall determine the type and quality of training based on guidance provided by ESE.

B)  By November 1st of the first year of this agreement, all Educators shall complete a professional learning activity about self-assessment and goal-setting satisfactory to the superintendent or principal. Any Educator hired after the November 1st date, and who has not previously completed such an activity, shall complete such a professional learning activity about self-assessment and goal-setting within three months of the date of hire. The district through the superintendent shall determine the type and quality of the learning activity based on guidance provided by ESE.

6)        Evaluation Cycle: Annual Orientation

A) At the start of each school year, the superintendent, principal or designee shall conduct a meeting for Educators and Evaluators focused substantially on educator evaluation. The superintendent, principal or designee shall:

i) Provide an overview of the evaluation process, including goal setting and the educator plans.

ii) Provide all Educators with directions for obtaining a copy of the forms used by the district. These may be electronically provided.

iii)The faculty meeting may be digitally recorded to facilitate orientation of Educators hired after the beginning of the school year.

7)        Evaluation Cycle: Self-Assessment

A)      Completing the Self-Assessment

i) The evaluation cycle begins with the Educator completing and submitting to the Primary or Supervising Evaluator a self-assessment by October 1st or within four weeks of the start of their employment at the school.

ii) The self-assessment includes:

(a) An analysis of evidence of student learning, growth and achievement for students under the Educator’s responsibility.

(b) An assessment of practice against each of the four Performance Standards of effective practice using the district’s rubric.

(c) Proposed goals to pursue:

(1st) At least one goal directly related to improving the Educator’s own professional practice. (2nd)At least one goal directed related to improving student learning.

B)      Proposing the goals

i) Educators must consider goals for grade-level, subject-area, department teams, or other groups of

Educators who share responsibility for student learning and results, except as provided in (ii) below. Educators may meet with teams to consider establishing team goals. Evaluators may participate in such meetings.

ii) For Educators in their first year of practice, the Evaluator or his/her designee will meet with each Educator by October 1st (or within four weeks of the Educator’s first day of employment if the Educator begins employment after September 15th) to assist the Educator in completing the self-assessment and drafting the professional practice and student learning goals which must include induction and mentoring activities.

iii)Unless the Evaluator indicates that an Educator in his/her second or third years of practice should continue to address induction and mentoring goals pursuant to 603 CMR 7.12, the Educator may address shared grade level or subject area team goals.

iv) For Educators with PTS and ratings of proficient or exemplary, the goals may be team goals. In addition, these Educators may include individual professional practice goals that address enhancing skills that enable the Educator to share proficient practices with colleagues or develop leadership skills.

v) For Educators with PTS and ratings of needs improvement or unsatisfactory, the professional practice goal(s) must address specific standards and indicators identified for improvement. In addition, the goals may address shared grade level or subject area team goals.

8)   Evaluation Cycle: Goal Setting and Development of the Educator Plan

A) Every Educator has an Educator Plan that includes, but is not limited to, one goal related to the improvement of practice; one goal for the improvement of student learning. The Plan also outlines actions the Educator must take to attain the goals established in the Plan and benchmarks to assess progress. Goals may be developed by individual Educators, by the Evaluator, or by teams, departments, or groups of Educators who have the similar roles and/or responsibilities. See Sections 15-19 for more on Educator Plans.

B) To determine the goals to be included in the Educator Plan, the Evaluator reviews the goals the Educator has proposed in the Self-Assessment, using evidence of Educator performance and impact on student learning, growth and achievement based on the Educator’s self-assessment and other sources that Evalua-tor shares with the Educator. The process for determining the Educator’s impact on student learning, growth and achievement will be determined after ESE issues guidance on this matter. See #22, below.

C) Educator Plan Development Meetings shall be conducted as follows:

i) Educators in the same school may meet with the Evaluator in teams and/or individually at the end of the previous evaluation cycle or by October 15th of the next academic year to develop their Educator Plan. Educators shall not be expected to meet during the summer hiatus.

ii) For those Educators new to the school, the meeting with the Evaluator to establish the Educator Plan must occur by October 15th or within six weeks of the start of their assignment in that school

iii) The Evaluator shall meet individually with Educators with PTS and ratings of needs improvement or unsatisfactory to develop professional practice goal(s) that must address specific standards and indicators identified for improvement. In addition, the goals may address shared grade level or subject matter goals.

D) The Educator completes the Goals and Educator Plan by November 1st. The Evaluator retains final authority over the content of the Educator’s Goals and Plan.

9)        Evaluation Cycle: Observation of Practice and Examination of Artifacts – Educators without PTS

A) In the first year of practice or first year assigned to a school:

i) The Educator shall have at least one announced observation during the school year using the protocol described in section 11B, below.

ii) The Educator shall have at least four unannounced observations during the school year.

B) In their second and third years of practice or second and third years as a non-PTS Educator in the school:

 i) The Educator shall have at least three unannounced observations during the school year.

10)      Evaluation Cycle: Observation of Practice and Examination of Artifacts – Educators with PTS

A) The Educator whose overall rating is proficient or exemplary must have at least one unannounced observation during the evaluation cycle.

B) The Educator whose overall rating is needs improvement must be observed according to the Directed Growth Plan during the period of Plan which must include at least two unannounced observations.

C) The Educator whose overall rating is unsatisfactory must be observed according to the Improvement Plan which must include both unannounced and announced observation. The number and frequency of the observations shall be determined by the Evaluator, but in no case, for improvement plans of one year, shall there be fewer than one announced and four unannounced observations. For Improvement Plans of six months or fewer, there must be no fewer than one announced and two unannounced observations.

11)      Observations

The Evaluator’s first observation of the Educator should take place by November 15. Observations required by the Educator Plan should be completed by May 15th. The Evaluator may conduct additional observations after this date. The Evaluator is not required nor expected to review all the indicators in a rubric during an observation.

A) Unannounced Observations

i) Unannounced observations may be in the form of partial or full-period classroom visitations, walkthroughs, or any other means deemed useful by the Evaluator, principal, superintendent or other administrator.

ii) The Educator will be provided with at least brief written feedback from the Evaluator within 3-5 school days of the observation using the form in Appendix D. The written feedback shall be delivered to the Educator in person, by email, placed in the Educator’s mailbox or mailed to the Educa-tor’s home.

iii) Any observation or series of observations resulting in one or more standards judged to be unsatisfactory or needs improvement for the first time must be followed by at least one observation of at least 30 minutes in duration within 30 school days.

B) Announced Observations

i) All non-PTS Educators in their first year in the school, PTS Educators on Improvement Plans and other educators at the discretion of the evaluator shall have at least one Announced Observation.

(a) The Evaluator shall select the date and time of the lesson or activity to be observed and discuss with the Educator any specific goal(s) for the observation.

(b) Within 5 school days of the scheduled observation, upon request of either the Evaluator or Educator, the Evaluator and Educator shall meet for a pre-observation conference. In lieu of a meeting, the Educator may inform the Evaluator in writing of the nature of the lesson, the student population served, and any other information that will assist the Evaluator to assess performance

(1st) The Educator shall provide the Evaluator a draft of the lesson, student conference, IEP plan or activity. If the actual plan is different, the Educator will provide the Evaluator with a copy prior to the observation.

(2nd) The Educator will be notified as soon as possible if the Evaluator will not be able to attend the scheduled observation. The observation will be rescheduled with the Educator as soon as reasonably practical.

(c) Within 5 school days of the observation, the Evaluator and Educator shall meet for a post-observation conference. This timeframe may be extended due to unavailability on the part of either the Evaluator or the Educator, but shall be rescheduled within 24 hours if possible.

(d)The Evaluator shall provide the Educator with written feedback within 5 school days of the post-observation conference. For any standard where the Educator’s practice was found to be unsatisfactory or needs improvement, the feedback must:

(1st) Describe the basis for the Evaluator’s judgment.

(2nd) Describe actions the Educator should take to improve his/her performance.

(3rd) Identify support and/or resources the Educator may use in his/her improvement.

(4th) State that the Educator is responsible for addressing the need for improvement.

12)  Evaluation Cycle: Formative Assessment

A) A specific purpose for evaluation is to promote student learning, growth and achievement by providing Educators with feedback for improvement. Evaluators are expected to make frequent unannounced visits to classrooms. Evaluators are expected to give targeted constructive feedback to Educators based on their observations of practice, examination of artifacts, and analysis of multiple measures of student learning, growth and achievement in relation to the Standards and Indicators of Effective Teaching Practice.

B) Formative Assessment may be ongoing throughout the evaluation cycle but typically takes places mid-cycle when a Formative Assessment report is completed. For an Educator on a two-year Self-Directed Growth Plan, the mid-cycle Formative Assessment report is replaced by the Formative Evaluation report at the end of year one. See section 13 below.

C) The Formative Assessment report provides written feedback and ratings to the Educator about his/her progress towards attaining the goals set forth in the Educator Plan, performance on Performance Standards and overall, or both.

D) No less than two weeks before the due date for the Formative Assessment report, which due date shall be established by the Evaluator with written notice to the Educator, the Educator shall provide to the Evaluator evidence of family outreach and engagement, fulfillment of professional responsibility and growth, and progress on attaining professional practice and student learning goals. The educator may provide to the evaluator additional evidence of the educator’s performances against the four Performance Standards.

E) Upon the request of either the Evaluator or the Educator, the Evaluator and the Educator will meet either before or after completion of the Formative Assessment Report.

F) The Evaluator shall complete the Formative Assessment report and provide a copy to the Educator. All Formative Assessment reports must be signed by the Evaluator and delivered face-to-face, by email or to the Educator’s school mailbox or home.

G) The Educator may reply in writing to the Formative Assessment report within 5 school days of receiving the report.

H) The Educator shall sign the Formative Assessment report by within 5 school days of receiving the report. The signature indicates that the Educator received the Formative Assessment report in a timely fashion. The signature does not indicate agreement or disagreement with its contents.

I) As a result of the Formative Assessment Report, the Evaluator may change the activities in the Educator Plan.

J) If the rating in the Formative Assessment report differs from the last summative rating the Educator received, the Evaluator may place the Educator on a different Educator Plan, appropriate to the new rating.

13)  Evaluation Cycle: Formative Evaluation for Two Year Self-Directed Plans Only

A) Educators on two year Self-Directed Growth Educator Plans receive a Formative Evaluation report near the end of the first year of the two year cycle. The Educator’s performance rating for that year shall be assumed to be the same as the previous summative rating unless evidence demonstrates a significant change in performance in which case the rating on the performance standards may change, and the Evaluator may place the Educator on a different Educator plan, appropriate to the new rating.

B) The Formative Evaluation report provides written feedback and ratings to the Educator about his/her progress towards attaining the goals set forth in the Educator Plan, performance on each performance standard and overall, or both.

C) No less than two weeks before the due date for the Formative Evaluation report, which due date shall be established by the Evaluator with written notice provided to the Educator, the Educator shall provide to the Evaluator evidence of family outreach and engagement, fulfillment of professional responsibility and growth, and progress on attaining professional practice and student learning goals. The educator may also provide to the evaluator additional evidence of the educator’s performance against the four Performance Standards.

D) The Evaluator shall complete the Formative Evaluation report and provide a copy to the Educator. All Formative Evaluation reports must be signed by the Evaluator and delivered face-to-face, by email or to the Educator’s school mailbox or home.

E) Upon the request of either the Evaluator or the Educator, the Evaluator and the Educator will meet either before or after completion of the Formative Evaluation Report.

F) The Educator may reply in writing to the Formative Evaluation report within 5 school days of receiving the report.

G) The Educator shall sign the Formative Evaluation report by within 5 school days of receiving the report. The signature indicates that the Educator received the Formative Evaluation report in a timely fashion. The signature does not indicate agreement or disagreement with its contents.

H) As a result of the Formative Evaluation report, the Evaluator may change the activities in the Educator Plan.

I) If the rating in the Formative Evaluation report differs from the last summative rating the Educator received, the Evaluator may place the Educator on a different Educator Plan, appropriate to the new rating.

14)  Evaluation Cycle: Summative Evaluation

A) The evaluation cycle concludes with a summative evaluation report. For Educators on a one or two year Educator Plan, the summative report must be written and provided to the educator by May 15th.

B) The Evaluator determines a rating on each standard and an overall rating based on the Evaluator’s professional judgment, an examination of evidence against the Performance Standards and evidence of the attainment of the Educator Plan goals.

C) The professional judgment of the primary evaluator shall determine the overall summative rating that the Educator receives.

D) For an educator whose overall performance rating is exemplary or proficient and whose impact on student learning is low, the evaluator’s supervisor shall discuss and review the rating with the evaluator and the supervisor shall confirm or revise the educator’s rating. In cases where the superintendent serves as the primary evaluator, the superintendent’s decision on the rating shall not be subject to review.

E) The summative evaluation rating must be based on evidence from multiple categories of evidence. MCAS Growth scores shall not be the sole basis for a summative evaluation rating.

F) To be rated proficient overall, the Educator shall, at a minimum, have been rated proficient on the Curriculum, Planning and Assessment and the Teaching All Students Standards of Effective Teaching Practice.

G) No less than four weeks before the due date for the Summative Evaluation report, which due date shall be established by the Evaluator with written notice provided to the Educator, the Educator will provide to the Evaluator evidence of family outreach and engagement, fulfillment of professional responsibility and growth, and progress on attaining professional practice and student learning goals. The educator may also provide to the evaluator additional evidence of the educator’s performance against the four Performance Standards.

H) The Summative Evaluation report should recognize areas of strength as well as identify recommendations for professional growth.

I) The Evaluator shall deliver a signed copy of the Summative Evaluation report to the Educator face-to-face, by email or to the Educator’s school mailbox or home no later than May 15th.

J) The Evaluator shall meet with the Educator rated needs improvement or unsatisfactory to discuss the summative evaluation. The meeting shall occur by June 1st.

K) The Evaluator may meet with the Educator rated proficient or exemplary to discuss the summative evaluation, if either the Educator or the Evaluator requests such a meeting. The meeting shall occur by June 10th.

L) Upon mutual agreement, the Educator and the Evaluator may develop the Self-Directed Growth Plan for the following two years during the meeting on the Summative Evaluation report.

M) The Educator shall sign the final Summative Evaluation report by June 15th. The signature indicates that the Educator received the Summative Evaluation report in a timely fashion. The signature does not indicate agreement or disagreement with its contents.

N) The Educator shall have the right to respond in writing to the summative evaluation which shall become part of the final Summative Evaluation report.

O) A copy of the signed final Summative Evaluation report shall be filed in the Educator’s personnel file.

15)      Educator Plans – General

A) Educator Plans shall be designed to provide Educators with feedback for improvement, professional growth, and leadership; and to ensure Educator effectiveness and overall system accountability. The Plan must be aligned to the standards and indicators and be consistent with district and school goals.

B) The Educator Plan shall include, but is not limited to:

i) At least one goal related to improvement of practice tied to one or more Performance Standards;

ii) At least one goal for the improvement the learning, growth and achievement of the students under the Educator’s responsibility;

iii) An outline of actions the Educator must take to attain the goals and benchmarks to assess progress. Actions must include specified professional development and learning activities that the Educator will participate in as a means of obtaining the goals, as well as other support that may be suggested by the Evaluator or provided by the school or district. Examples may include but are not limited to coursework, self-study, action research, curriculum development, study groups with peers, and implementing new programs.

C) It is the Educator’s responsibility to attain the goals in the Plan and to participate in any trainings and professional development provided through the state, district, or other providers in accordance with the Educator Plan.

16)      Educator Plans: Developing Educator Plan

A) The Developing Educator Plan is for all Educators without PTS, and, at the discretion of the Evaluator, Educators with PTS in new assignments.

B) The Educator shall be evaluated at least annually.

17)      Educator Plans: Self-Directed Growth Plan

A) A Two-year Self-Directed Growth Plan is for those Educators with PTS who have an overall rating of proficient or exemplary, and after 2013-2014 whose impact on student learning is moderate or high. A formative evaluation report is completed at the end of year 1 and a summative evaluation report at the end of year 2.

B) A One-year Self-Directed Growth Plan is for those Educators with PTS who have an overall rating of proficient or exemplary, and after 2013-2014 whose impact on student learning is low. In this case, the Evaluator and Educator shall analyze the discrepancy between the summative evaluation rating and the rating for impact on student learning to seek to determine the cause(s) of the discrepancy.

18)      Educator Plans: Directed Growth Plan

A) A Directed Growth Plan is for those Educators with PTS whose overall rating is needs improvement.

B) The goals in the Plan must address areas identified as needing improvement as determined by the Evaluator.

C) The Evaluator shall complete a summative evaluation for the Educator at the end of the period determined by the Plan, but at least annually, and in no case later than June 10th.

D) For an Educator on a Directed Growth Plan whose overall performance rating is at least proficient, the Evaluator will place the Educator on a Self-Directed Growth Plan for the next Evaluation Cycle.

E) For an Educator on a Directed Growth Plan whose overall performance rating is not at least proficient, the Evaluator will rate the Educator as unsatisfactory and will place the Educator on an Improvement Plan for the next Evaluation Cycle.

19)      Educator Plans: Improvement Plan

A) An Improvement Plan is for those Educators with PTS whose overall rating is unsatisfactory.

B) The parties agree that in order to provide students with the best instruction, it may be necessary from time to time to place an Educator whose practice has been rated as unsatisfactory on an Improvement Plan of no fewer than 30 calendar days and no more than one school year. In the case of an Educator receiving a rating of unsatisfactory near the close of one school year, the Improvement Plan may include activities that occur during the summer before the next school year begins.

C) The Evaluator must complete a summative evaluation for the Educator at the end of the period determined by the Evaluator for the Plan.

D) An Educator on an Improvement Plan shall be assigned a Supervising Evaluator (see definitions). The Supervising Evaluator is responsible for providing the Educator with guidance and assistance in accessing the resources and professional development outlined in the Improvement Plan. The primary evalua-tor may be the Supervising Evaluator.

E) The Improvement Plan shall define the problem(s) of practice identified through the observations and evaluation and detail the improvement goals to be met, the activities the Educator must take to improve and the assistance to be provided to the Educator by the district.

F) The Improvement Plan process shall include:

i) Within ten school days of notification to the Educator that the Educator is being placed on an Improvement Plan, the Evaluator shall schedule a meeting with the Educator to discuss the Improvement Plan. The Evaluator will develop the Improvement Plan, which will include the provision of specific assistance to the Educator.

ii) The Educator may request that a representative of the Employee Organization/Association attend the meeting(s).

iii) If the Educator consents, the Employee Organization/Association will be informed that an Educator has been placed on an Improvement Plan.

G) The Improvement Plan shall:

i) Define the improvement goals directly related to the performance standard(s) and/or student learning outcomes that must be improved;

ii) Describe the activities and work products the Educator must complete as a means of improving performance;

iii) Describe the assistance that the district will make available to the Educator;

iv) Articulate the measurable outcomes that will be accepted as evidence of improvement;

v) Detail the timeline for completion of each component of the Plan, including at a minimum a mid-cycle formative assessment report of the relevant standard(s) and indicator(s);

vi) Identify the individuals assigned to assist the Educator which must include minimally the Supervising Evaluator; and,

vii)   Include the signatures of the Educator and Supervising Evaluator.

H) A copy of the signed Plan shall be provided to the Educator. The Educator’s signature indicates that the Educator received the Improvement Plan in a timely fashion. The signature does not indicate agreement or disagreement with its contents.

I) Decision on the Educator’s status at the conclusion of the Improvement Plan.

i) All determinations below must be made no later than June 1. One of three decisions must be made at the conclusion of the Improvement Plan:

(a) If the Evaluator determines that the Educator has improved his/her practice to the level of proficiency, the Educator will be placed on a Self-Directed Growth Plan.

(b)In those cases where the Educator was placed on an Improvement Plan as a result of his/her sum-mative rating at the end of his/her Directed Growth Plan, if the Evaluator determines that the Educator is making substantial progress toward proficiency, the Evaluator shall place the Educator on a Directed Growth Plan.

(c) In those cases where the Educator was placed on an Improvement Plan as a result of his/her Sum-mative rating at the end of his/her Directed Growth Plan, if the Evaluator determines that the Educator is not making substantial progress toward proficiency, the Evaluator shall recommend to the superintendent that the Educator be dismissed.

(d)If the Evaluator determines that the Educator’s practice remains at the level of unsatisfactory, the Evaluator shall recommend to the superintendent that the Educator be dismissed.

20.   Timelines

Developing Educator Plan: Educators with Non-Professional Status or Educators with a new assignment

ACTIVITY

COMPLETED BY:

Evaluator meets with educator to assist in self-assessment

Educator submits self-assessment

October 1

Evaluator meets with educators in teams or individually to establish Goals and Educator Plans (Educator Plan may be established at Summative Evaluation Report meeting in prior school year.)

October 15

Educator completes Goals and Educator Plans

November 1

Evaluator completes first announced observation of each educator

November 15

Evaluator completes unannounced observation(s)

Any time during the evaluation cycle

Educator submits evidence on parent outreach, professional growth, progress on goals (and other standards, if desired)

January 15

Evaluator completes mid-cycle Formative Assessment Report

March 1

Evaluator holds Formative Assessment Meetings if requested by either evaluator or educator

March 15

Educator submits evidence on parent outreach, professional growth, progress on goals (and other standards, if desired)

May 1

Evaluator completes Summative Evaluation Report

June 1

Evaluator meets with educators whose overall Summative Evaluation ratings are Needs Improvement or Unsatisfactory

June 10

Evaluator meets with educators whose ratings are proficient or exemplary at request of evaluator or educator

June 10

Educator signs Summative Evaluation Report and adds response, if any within 5 school days of receipt

June 15

Self-Directed Growth Plan: Educators with PTS on Two-Year Plans

•    Educators who have an overall rating of proficient or exemplary and after 2013-2014 whose impact on student learning is moderate or high.

ACTIVITY

COMPLETED BY:

Evaluator meets with educator to assist in self-assessment

October 1

Educator submits self-assessment

 

Evaluator meets with educators in teams or individually to establish goal setting process and Educator Plans (Educator Plan may be established at Summative Evaluation Report meeting in prior school year

October 15

Educator completes Goals and Educator Plans

November 1

Evaluator completes unannounced observation(s)

Any time during the 2-year evaluation cycle

Educator submits evidence on parent outreach, professional growth, progress on goals (and other standards, if desired)

January 15

Evaluator completes Formative Evaluation Report and conducts Formative Evaluation Meeting at request of Evaluator or Educator

June 1 of Year 1

Educator submits evidence on parent outreach, professional growth, progress on goals (and other standards, if desired)

May 1st of Year 2

Evaluator completes Summative Evaluation Report

June 1 of Year 2

Evaluator meets with educators whose overall Summative Evaluation ratings are Needs Improvement or Unsatisfactory

June 10 of Year 2

Evaluator meets with educators whose overall Summative Evaluation ratings are proficient or exemplary at request of Evaluator or Educator

June 10 of Year 2

Educator signs Summative Evaluation Report and adds response, if any, within 5 school days of receipt

June 15 of Year 2

Self-Directed Growth Plan: Educators with PTS on One-Year Plan:

• Educators who have been rated proficient or exemplary and after 2013-2014 whose impact on student learning is low.

ACTIVITY

COMPLETED BY:

Evaluator meets with educator to assist in self-assessment

October 1

Educator submits self-assessment

 

Evaluator meets with Educators in teams or individually to establish proposed goals, one of which must address low outcome and Educator Plans (Educator Plan may be established at Summative Evaluation Report meeting in prior school year

October 15

Educator completes Goals and Educator Plans

November 1

Evaluator completes unannounced observation(s)

Any time during the evaluation cycle

Educator submits evidence on parent outreach, professional growth, progress on goals (and other standards, if desired)

January 15

Evaluator completes mid-cycle Formative Assessment Report

February 1

Evaluator holds Formative Assessment Meetings if requested by either evaluator or educator

February 15

Educator submits evidence on parent outreach, professional growth, progress on goals (and other standards, if desired)

May 1

Evaluator completes Summative Evaluation Report

June 1

Evaluator meets with educators whose overall Summative Evaluation ratings are Needs Improvement or Unsatisfactory

June 10

Evaluator meets with educators whose ratings are proficient or exemplary at request of evaluator or educator

June 10

Educator signs Summative Evaluation Report and adds response, if any within 5 school days of receipt

June 15

Directed Growth Plan: Educators with PTS on One-Year Plan

•    Educators who have an overall rating of needs improvement

ACTIVITY

COMPLETED BY:

Evaluator meets with educator to assist in self-assessment

Educator submits self-assessment

October 1

Evaluator meets with educator to establish goal setting process and Educator Plans (Educator Plan may be established at Summative Evaluation Report meeting in prior school year)

October 15

Educator completes Educator Plans

November 1

Evaluator completes first announced observation of each educator* *At the discretion of the evaluator

November 15

Evaluator completes unannounced observation(s)

Any time during the evaluation cycle

Educator submits evidence on parent outreach, professional growth, progress on goals (and other standards, if desired)

January 15

Evaluator completes mid-cycle Formative Assessment Report

February 1

Evaluator holds Formative Assessment Meetings if requested by either evaluator or educator

February 15

Educator submits evidence on parent outreach, professional growth, progress on goals (and other standards, if desired)

May 1

Evaluator completes Summative Evaluation Report

June 1

Evaluator meets with educators whose overall Summative Evaluation ratings are Needs Improvement or Unsatisfactory

June 10

Evaluator meets with educators whose ratings are proficient or exemplary at request of Evaluator or Educator

June 10

Educator signs Summative Evaluation Report and adds response, if any within 5 school days of receipt

June 15

Improvement Plan: Educators with PTS whose overall rating is unsatisfactory

The timeline for educators on Plans of less than one year will be established in the Educator Plan.

21.      Career Advancement

A)  In order to attain Professional Teacher Status, the Educator should achieve ratings of proficient or exemplary on each Performance Standard and overall. A principal considering making an employment decision that would lead to PTS for any Educator who has not been rated proficient or exemplary on each performance standard and overall on the most recent evaluation shall confer with the superintendent by May 1. The principal’s decision is subject to review and approval by the superintendent.

B)   In order to qualify to apply for a teacher leader position, the Educator must have had a Summative Evaluation performance rating of proficient or exemplary for at least the previous two years.

C)   Educators with PTS whose summative performance rating is exemplary and, after 2013-14 whose impact on student learning is rated moderate or high, shall be recognized and rewarded with leadership roles, promotions, additional compensation, public commendation or other acknowledgement as determined by the district through collective bargaining where applicable.

22.      Rating Impact on Student Learning Growth

ESE will provide model contract language and guidance on rating educator impact on student learning growth based on state and district-determined measures of student learning by July 15, 2012. Upon receiving this model contract language and guidance, the parties agree to bargain with respect to this matter.

23.      Using Student feedback in Educator Evaluation

ESE will provide model contract language, direction and guidance on using student feedback in Educator Evaluation by June 30, 2013. Upon receiving this model contract language, direction and guidance, the parties agree to bargain with respect to this matter.

24.      Using Staff feedback in Educator Evaluation

ESE will provide model contract language, direction and guidance on using staff feedback in Administrator Evaluation by June 30, 2013. Upon receiving this model contract language, direction and guidance, the parties agree to bargain with respect to this matter.

25.      General Provisions

A)   Only Educators who are licensed may serve as primary evaluators of Educators.

B)   Evaluators shall not make negative comments about the Educator’s performance, or comments of a negative evaluative nature, in the presence of students, parents or other staff, except in the unusual circumstance where the Evaluator concludes that s/he must immediately and directly intervene. Nothing in this paragraph is intended to limit an administrator’s ability to investigate a complaint, or secure assistance to support an Educator.

C)   The superintendent shall insure that Evaluators have training in supervision and evaluation, including the regulations and standards and indicators of effective teaching practice promulgated by ESE (35.03), and the evaluation Standards and Procedures established in this Agreement.

D)  Should there be a serious disagreement between the Educator and the Evaluator regarding an overall summative performance rating of unsatisfactory, the Educator may meet with the Evaluator’s supervisor to discuss the disagreement. Should the Educator request such a meeting, the Evaluator’s supervisor must meet with the Educator. The Evaluator may attend any such meeting at the discretion of the superintendent.

E)   The parties agree to establish a joint labor-management evaluation team which shall review the evaluation processes and procedures annually through the first three years of implementation and recommend adjustments to the parties. It is the intent of the School District and the Association that the evaluation process be reviewed on a periodic basis. If changes in the evaluation process are recommended, the new process will be subject to ratification by the Association and the School Committee.

F)   Violations of this article are subject to the grievance and arbitration procedures. The arbitrator shall determine whether there was substantial compliance with the totality of the evaluation process. When the evaluation process results in the termination or non-renewal of an Educator, then no financial remedy or reinstatement shall issue if there was substantial compliance.

G)  Subject to the provisions of this article, all observations by any means for the purpose of evaluating the professional performance of a teacher will be conducted openly and with the full knowledge of the teacher.

ARTICLE 30

DURATION OF AGREEMENT

30.1.   The conditions of employment subject to the provisions of this Agreement become applicable on July 1, 2014 and shall continue to be so applicable until June 30, 2017.

30.2.    Any party to this Agreement may initiate negotiations for a successor agreement to this Agreement to be effective on or after July 1, 2017, by tendering written notice to the other parties on or after September 1, 2016. In the event that negotiations are undertaken for a successor agreement, all terms and conditions of this Agreement shall continue in full force and effect until a successor agreement is signed.

WAIVER FORM

(See SECTION 25.6.3)

TO:

FROM:

SUBJECT: Employment Status Waiver - Involuntary Leave of Absence

This is to notify you that the Superintendent of the Concord-Carlisle Regional School District intends to act upon your employment status on ___________________________, consistent with the notification you have already received dated ___________________________

You shall be considered on a two year involuntary leave of absence and eligible for recall pursuant to the contract if you execute this waiver form. Executing this waiver will also protect your professional teacher status, seniority and contractual benefits during the recall period. Also, should you wish to be given preference on the substitute list during the recall period, you should notify the Human Resources Office.

Your layoff has been caused by severe budgetary constraints and/or student enrollment decreases and in no way reflects upon your years of satisfactory service as a member of the professional staff.

If you intend to elect involuntary leave of absence, please sign and return this form to the Human Resources Office by ___________________________. If we do not receive a signed form by this date, we will assume that you do not wish to accept involuntary leave of absence status. The Superintendent will then undertake dismissal procedures pursuant to G.L.C. 71, $.42.

______________________________________________________________________________________

WAIVER

In consideration of treating my lay-off as a two year involuntary unpaid leave of absence, I hereby agree not to exercise any present or future rights that I have under G.L.C. 71, and S.42 and S.43A and relieve the Concord-Carlisle Regional School District of any obligation it may have to comply with said statutes with respect to this lay-off to be effective September 1, 20 .________ I understand that by accepting this involuntary unpaid leave of absence, I will retain all professional teacher status rights, seniority and other contractual benefits in lieu of dismissal. If am not recalled during this leave of absence, I understand that the Superintendent will act on my dismissal pursuant to C.72 S.42 at the end of the involuntary leave of absence and I hereby waive my rights pursuant to C.71S S.42 and S.43A with respect to the Superintendent’s action at that time.

Signature: _________________________                      Date:_____________________________

SIDE LETTERS OF AGREEMENT

between

THE CONCORD-CARLISLE REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL

COMMITTEE

and

THE CONCORD-CARLISLE TEACHERS’ ASSOCIATION

COACHING STIPENDS

The parties agree that the provision of a single, 3% increase in the coaching stipends set forth in Section 6.7 of their 2007 – 2010 collective bargaining agreement reflects in part the comprehensive process of revising the coaching stipends and the methodology for determining them, and it is agreed that the provision of a single 3% increase shall be without precedent to any future proceedings, negotiations or agreement.

EVALUATION PROCEDURES FOR TEACHERS – SUBCOMMITTEE

The parties agree to create a subcommittee of up to five members appointed by the Association and up to five members appointed by the School Committee to review and recommend changes to the current “Evaluation Procedures for Teachers.” Recommendations shall be submitted to the bargaining committees for the School Committee and the CCTA and, if agreed to by those parties, shall be incorporated into the Evaluation Procedures for Teachers. This shall not constitute a reopening of the agreement.

RECONFIGURATION OF SALARY SCALES

The parties agree that in implementing in the 2007 – 2008 school year the renumbered step schedule set forth in Section 3.3, by way of example, a teacher on step 3 prior to the 2007 – 2008 school year shall advance to step 4 (unless the step increment was withheld in conformance with an applicable provision of the collective bargaining agreement) which shall then be renumbered as step 3.

SIGNATURE PAGE

This Agreement has been mutually ratified by the Concord-Carlisle Regional District School Committee and the Concord-Carlisle Teachers' Association,

IN WITNESS WHEREOF the parties have caused these presents to be signed and delivered by their duly authorized representatives as of the day and year first below written.

For the Concord-Carlisle Teachers Association:

______________________________________

Signature

______________________________________

Date

For the Concord-Carlisle School Committee:

______________________________________

Signature

______________________________________

Date

APPENDIX A

THE MENTOR PROGRAM

•      Establish two categories

1.     “Guide” program for those teachers new to CPS/CCHS who:

- have had successful teaching experience (three years minimum)

- were previously on professional status elsewhere

2.     True “mentor” program for those teachers new to CPS/CCHS who:

- are working towards certification (rare)

- have provisional certification and need mentorship to move to standard

- request a more intensive experience

- started in guide program, but chairperson (based on observation) feels they need more direct support.

•     Requirements of each category

1.     Guide program would only require the paid day in the summer, followed by weekly guide meetings.

The veteran guide would get $500 stipend (and could be the guide to more than one person if needed at additional stipend).

There would be no PDPs awarded due the nature of the program.

2.     The mentor program would require the mentor to focus on instructional as well as climate issues.

Both mentor and mentee would attend 5 meetings per year in addition to paid summer day and the stipend would be $1,000.

There would be peer observation and coaching.

Mentors would be encouraged to take a DOE-sponsored mentor program prior to being a mentor (if this agreement continues, in future years, the DOE training would be mandatory).

There would be a more stringent application process than for the guide program.

No one could mentor two people in the same year, however, if absolutely necessary, could be a guide to a second person with additional stipend.

There would be PDPs if the program meets the DOE requirements.

APPENDIX B

Grievance Form

Concord Carlisle Teachers’ Association

and the

Concord Carlisle Regional School District

Level (Circle One): One / Two / Three

Grievant’s Name ________________________________________________________________________

 Supervisor at Level 1:____________________________________________________________________

Statement of the Grievance:

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

 Contract Article(s)

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

Violated: Remedy sought at this Level:

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________                       _______________________________________

Signature of Grievant                                                               Date

APPENDIX C

Stipend Calculations for Base Year

Sample communities used for calculations:

Acton Boxborough

Bedford

Concord-Carlisle Regional School

Lexington

Lincoln-Sudbury

Needham

Newton South

Wayland

Wellesley

Westford

Weston

Sample sports used to establish stipend:

Baseball

Basketball

Field Hockey

Hockey

Lacrosse

Soccer

Varsity Coach Calculations

•    Gather available maximum salary information in each community for each sport in the base year

•    Calculate the average maximum salary by community

•    Rank communities highest to lowest for the average of sports

•     Using the top 30% placed Concord between 3rd and 4th ranked communities. Therefore, calculations were based on data for the 3rd and 4th ranked communities. In the case of current data, Newton (3ed) average is $6,386; Acton Boxborough (4th) average is $5,983. The average of these two communities is $6,184 for approximate varsity coach position. Recommendation was made to round up to $6,200.

•     Exceptions:

• Varsity golf and cheerleading will be paid at the same level as the JV coach positions.

Junior Varsity and Assistant Coach Calculations

•     Gather available maximum salary information in each community for each JV sport in base year. May be done for one sport only.

•     Measure the ratio of varsity to JV compensation and develop an average ratio for all communities.

•    Apply the ratio to varsity coach stipend to calculate the JV stipend

•    Calculation yields a percentage of 67.8%; this results in a stipend of $4,192 or $4,200 with rounding.

•    Exceptions:

• Varsity golf and cheerleading will be paid at the same level as the JV coach positions.

Appendix D: Evaluation Forms

The forms included in this Appendix are provided as tools to support educators and evaluators as they implement the new educator evaluation framework. For all of these forms, additional pages may be attached as needed.

Self-Assessment Form. This form is intended to be used in support of Step 1: Self-Assessment, the educator’s initial step of the cycle. The form can be used by individuals or teams; however, each individual will need to submit a self-assessment. Evaluators sign the form to indicate re-ceipt. The form includes sections for the educator to complete an analysis of student learning, growth, and achievement and an assessment of practice against performance standards. Submission of this form will be noted and initialed on the ETS. Due October 1st

Goal Setting and Plan Form. This form is intended to be used in support of Step 1: Self-Assessment and Step 2: Goal Setting and Plan Development. Individuals and teams may use this form to propose goals (a mini-mum of one student learning goal and one professional practice goal). The form should initially be submitted with the Self-Assessment Form with the box “Proposed Goals” checked. If the goals are approved as written, the evaluator will check the box “Final Goals” and include a copy of the form with the Educator Plan Form. If the goals undergo further refinement, edits may be made to the original, or the form may be rewritten. If the form is redone, the new form should have the box “Final Goals” checked and should then be attached to the Educator Plan Form. Submission of this form will be noted and initialed on the ETS. This form will either be completed by the educator for a Self-Directed Growth Plan, by the educator and the evaluator together for a Directed Growth Plan and a Developing Educa-tor Plan, and by the evaluator for an Improvement Plan. Completion and/or submission of this form will be noted and initialed on the ETS. Due November 1st

Formative Assessment Report Form. This form is intended to be used in support of an educator’s formative assessment (Step 4) at the mid-point of the evaluation cycle, at minimum; it can be used multiple times as Formative Assessment can be ongoing. It will be completed by the evaluator. Evaluators are not required to assess both progress toward goals and performance on Standards; they will check off whether they are evaluating “Progress toward Attaining Goals,” “Performance on each Standard,” or both. Evaluators will provide a brief narrative of progress that includes feedback for improvement. Educators sign off to indicate that they have received a copy of the report and may use the Educator Response Form to provide a written response. Completion of this form will be noted and initialed on the ETS.

Formative Evaluation Report Form. This form is intended to be used in support of an educator’s formative evaluation at the end of year one of a two-year Self-Directed Growth Plan. It will be completed by the evaluator. Evaluators are not required to assess both progress toward goals and performance on Standards; they will check off whether they are evaluating “Progress toward Attaining Goals,” “Performance on each Standard,” or both. Evaluators will provide a brief narrative of progress that includes feedback for improvement. At the point of Formative Evaluation, the overall rating is assumed to be the same as the prior summative evaluation unless evidence demonstrates a significant change in performance leading to a change in Overall Rating and, possibly, Educator Plan. If there is a change in rating, evaluators must provide comments on each of the four Standards briefly describing why the rating has changed, the evidence that led to a change in rating, and offering feedback for improvement (evaluators are encouraged to provide comments even if there is no change to ensure that educators have a clear sense of their progress and performance and receive feedback for improvement). Educators sign off to indicate that they have received a copy of the report and may use the Educator Response Form to provide a written response. Completion of this form will be noted and initialed on the ETS. Due June 1st of year one in a two year Self-Directed Growth Plan

Summative Evaluation Report Form. This form is intended to be used for Step 5: Summative Evaluation. This form applies to all Educator Plans. It will be completed by the evaluator. The evaluator must complete all sections, which are: “Attainment of Student Learning Goal(s),” “Attainment of Professional Practice Goal(s), “Rating on each Standard,” “Overall Performance Rating,” and “Plan Moving Forward.” Evaluators must provide comments on the student learning goal(s), professional practice goal(s), each of the four Standards, and the overall rating briefly describing the level of attainment or performance rating, the evidence that led to the level of attainment/rating, and offering feedback for improvement. Educators sign off to indicate that they have received a copy of the report and may use the Educator Response Form to provide a written response. Completion of this form will be noted and initialed on the (ETS).

Due June 1st

Observation Feedback Form. This form is used to give educators feedback on unannounced and announced observations. Due within 5 school days of observation

Self-Assessment Form                                                                                        Due October 1st

Educator—Name/Title: ___________________________________________________________________

Primary Evaluator—Name/Title: ___________________________________________________________

Supervising Evaluator, if any—Name/Title/Role in evaluation: ___________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

School(s):______________________________________________________________________________

Part 1: Analysis of Student Learning, Growth, and Achievement

Briefly summarize areas of strength and high-priority concerns for students under your responsibility for the upcoming school year. Cite evidence such as results from available assessments. This form should be individually submitted by educator, but Part 1 can also be used by individuals and/or teams who jointly review and analyze student data.

603 CMR 35.06 (2)(a)1

____________________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________

Team, if applicable: ___________________________________________________________________

List Team Members below

___________________________________          ___________________________________________

___________________________________          ___________________________________________

Educator—Name/Title:

Part 2: Assessment of Practice Against Performance Standards

Citing your district’s performance rubric, briefly summarize areas of strength and high-priority areas for growth. Areas may target specific Standards, Indicators, or Elements, or span multiple Indicators or Elements within or across Standards. The form should be individually submitted by educator, but Part 2 can also be used by teams in preparation for proposing team goals.

603 CMR 35.06 (2)(a)2

____________________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________

Team, if applicable:____________________________________________________________________

List Team Members below

___________________________________          ___________________________________________

___________________________________          ___________________________________________

Signature of Educator___________________________         Date______________________________

Signature of Evaluator ___________________________        Date______________________________

* The evaluator’s signature indicates that he or she has received a copy of the self-assessment form and the goal setting form with proposed goals. It does not denote approval of the goals

Goal Setting and Plan Form                                                                               Due November 1st

Educator-Name :________________________________________________________________________

Primary Evaluator-Name/Title:_____________________________________________________________

Supervising Evaluator, if any-Name/Title/Role in evaluation:_____________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

School(s): _____________________________________

Educator Plan:    

[…]Self-Directed Growth Plan   

[…]Directed Growth Plan

[…]Developing Educator Plan  

[…]Improvement Plan*

Plan Duration    […] 2-Year            […] One-Year      […] Less than a year _____________

Start Date: _____________________                                        End Date: ___________________

O Goal Setting Form with final goals is attached to the Educator Plan.

Some activities may apply to the pursuit of multiple goals or types of goals (student learning or professional practice). Attach additional pages as necessary.

Student Learning Goal(s): Planned Activities ·.     Describe actions the educator will take to attain the student learning goal(s). Activities may apply to individual and/or team Attach additional pages as needed.

'SMART Goal:

[…]  Individual

[…]  ·Team:

Action

Supports/Resources from

School/District1

Timeline or Frequency

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _  __ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _  __ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _  __ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _  __ __

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

*Additional detail may be attached if needed

SMART: S=Specific and Strategic; M=Measurable; A=Action Oriented;

R=Rigorous, Realistic, and Results-Focused; T=Timed and Tracked

Goal Setting and Plan Form                                                                               Due November 1st

Educator-Name/Title: _____________________________________________________________

Professional Practice Goal(s) and Planned Activities     . . Describe actions the educator will take to attain the student learning goal(s). Activities may apply to individual and/or team Attach additional pages as needed. SMART Goal:

[…] Individual                                             ..,

[…] Team:

Action

Supports/Resources from

School/District1

Timeline or Frequency

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _  __ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _  __ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _  __ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _  __ __

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

This Educator Plan is "designed to provide educators with feedback for improvement, professional growth, and leadership," is "aligned to statewide Standards and Indicators in 603 CMR 35.00 and local Performance Standards," and "is consistent with district and school goals." (see 603 CMR 35.06 (3)(d) and 603 CMR 35.06(3)(f).)

Signature of Evaluator __________________                                              Date______________________

Signature of Evaluator __________________                                              Date______________________

*As the evaluator retains final authority over goals to be included in an educator's plan (see 603 CMR 35.06(3)(c)), the signature of the educator indicates that he or she has received the Goal Setting Form with the "Final Goal" box checked, indicating the evaluator's approval of the goals. The educator's signature does not necessarily denote agreement with the goals. Regardless of agreement with the final goals, signature indicates recognition that "It is the educator's responsibility to attain the goals in the plan and to participate in any trainings and professional development provided through the state, district, or other providers in accordance with the Educator Plan." (see 603 CMR 35.06(4))

______________________________________________________________________________________

1 Must identify means for educator to receive feedback for improvement per 603 CMR 35.06(3)@

______________________________________________________________________________________

Formative Assessment Report Form

Educator-Name/Title:   _________________________________________________________

Primary Evaluator-Name/Title: __________________________________________________

Supervising Evaluator, if any-Name/Title/Role in evaluation: ___________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

School(s): ___________________________________________________________________

Assessing1:

[…] Progress toward attaining goals                 […]  Performance on Standards                  […]  Both

Progress Toward Student Learning Goal(s) Describe current level of progress and feedback for improvement. Attach additional pages as needed

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

Progress Toward Professional Practice Goal(s) Describe current level of progress. Attach additional pages as needed.

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

1 As per 603 CMR 35.02 and 603 CMR 35.06(5), formative assessment shall mean the process used to assess progress towards attaining goals set forth in educator plans, performance on performance standards, or both.

______________________________________________________________________________________

Educator—Name/Title: ___________________________________________________________________

Performance on Each Standard

Describe performance and feedback for improvement. Attach additional pages as needed.

I: Curriculum, Planning, & Assessment

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

II: Teaching All Students

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

III: Family & Community Engagement

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

IV: Professional Culture

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

The educator shall have the opportunity to respond in writing to the formative assessment as per 603 CMR 35.06(5)(c) on the Educator Response Form.

Signature of Evaluator ___________________                Date Completed:__________________________

Signature of Educator*_____________________             Date Received:_______________________

* Signature of the educator indicates acknowledgement of this report; it does not necessarily denote agreement with the contents of the report. Educators have the opportunity to respond to this report in writing and may use the Educator Report Form.

* For educators on two-year Self-Directed Growth Plans at the end of Year One of the cycle

Educator-Name/Title:   _________________________________________________________

Primary Evaluator-Name/Title: __________________________________________________

Supervising Evaluator, if any-Name/Title/Role in evaluation: ___________________________

____________________________________________________________________________

School(s): ___________________________________________________________________

Assessing1:

[…]  Progress toward attaining goals                  […] Performance on Standards                   […] Both

Progress Toward Student Learning Goal(s)

Attach additional pages as needed.

[…] Did not meet   

[…] Some progress

 […]Significant Progress

 […]Met        

[…] Exceeded

Rationale, evidence, and feedback for improvement:

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

Progress Toward Professional Practice Goal(s)

Attach additional pages as needed.

[…]Did not meet 

[…]Some progress 

[…]Significant Progress 

 […]Met     

 […]Exceeded

 Rationale, evidence, and feedback for improvement:

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

1 As per 603 CMR 35.02 and 603 CMR 35.06(5), formative evaluation shall mean the process used to assess progress towards attaining goals set forth in educator plans, performance on performance standards, or both.

______________________________________________________________________________________

Educator-Name/Title:   _________________________________________________________

[…] Evaluator is assigning same ratings as prior Summative Evaluation; no comments needed

[…]  Evaluator is assigning ratings that differ from prior Summative Evaluation; comments are required

Rating on Each Standard

I: Curriculum, Planning, &  Assessment 

[…]Unsatisfactory  

[…]  Needs Improvement  

[…] Proficient

   […] Exemplary

Rationale, evidence, and feedback for improvement:

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________II: Teaching All Students  

[…] Unsatisfactory   

[…] Needs Improvement  

[…] Proficient 

[…] Exemplary

Rationale evidence, and feedback for improvement:

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

III:  Family/Community Engagement

[…] Unsatisfactory    

[…] Needs Improvement  

[…] Proficient   

[…]  Exemplary

Rationale, evidence, and feedback for improvement:

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

IV:Professional Culture 

[…]  Unsatisfactory

[…] Needs Improvement   

 […] Proficient

 […] Exemplary

Rationale evidence, and feedback for improvement:

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

Educator-Name/Title:   _________________________________________________________

[…]  Evaluator is assigning same ratings as prior Summative Evaluation; no comments needed

[…]  Evaluator is assigning ratings that differ from prior Summative Evaluation; comments required

Overall Performance Rating

[…] Unsatisfactory            […] Needs Improvement             […] Proficient           […] Exemplary

Rationale, evidence, and feedback for improvement:

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

Plan Moving Forward

[…]  Self-Directed

 […]  Directed Growth Plan

[…]  Improvement Plan

[…]  Developing Educator Growth Plan

The educator shall have the opportunity to respond in writing to the formative evaluation as per 603 CMR 35.06(5) (c) on the Educator Response Form.

Signature of Evaluator___________________________        Date Completed:________________

Signature of Educator*__________________________         Date Received: ________________

* Signature of the educator indicates acknowledgement of this report; it does not necessarily denote agreement with the contents of the report. Educators have the opportunity to respond to this report in writing and may use the Educator Report Form.

Educator-Name/Title:   _________________________________________________________

Primary Evaluator-Name/Title: __________________________________________________

Supervising Evaluator, if any-Name/Title/Role in evaluation: __________________________

____________________________________________________________________________

School(s): ___________________________________________________________________

Current Plan:                 

Self-Directed Growth Plan

Directed Growth Plan

Developing Educator Plan   

Improvement Plan

Progress Toward Student Learning Goal(s)

Attach additional pages as needed.

[…]  Did not meet

[…] Some progress   

 […] Significant Progress  

[…]   Met  

[…]  Exceeded

 Rationale, evidence, and feedback for improvement:

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

Progress Toward Professional Practice Goal(s)

Attach additional pages as needed.

[…] Did not meet

 […]    Some progress

 […] Significant Progress

 […] Met

 […]   Exceeded

Rationale, evidence, and feedback for improvement:

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

Educator-Name/Title:   _________________________________________________________

Rating on Each Standard

I: Curriculum, Planning, & Assessment 

[…] Unsatisfactory  

[…]  Needs Improvement  

[…] Proficient 

 […]Exemplary

Rationale, evidence, and feedback for improvement:

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

II: Teaching  All Students               

[…]  Unsatisfactory  

[…] Needs Improvement   

[…]  Proficient 

 […] Exemplary

Rationale evidence, and feedback for improvement:

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

III:  Family/Community Engagement  

[…]  Unsatisfactory  

[…] Needs Improvement   

[…]  Proficient 

 […] Exemplary

Rationale, evidence, and feedback for improvement:

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

IV: Professional Culture      

[…]  Unsatisfactory  

[…] Needs Improvement   

[…]  Proficient 

 […] Exemplary

Rationale evidence, and feedback for improvement:

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

Educator-Name/Title:   _________________________________________________________

Overall Performance Rating

[…]  Unsatisfactory  

[…] Needs Improvement   

[…]  Proficient 

 […] Exemplary

Rationale, evidence, and feedback for improvement:

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

Plan Moving Forward

[…]  Self-Directed Growth Plan              

 […]  Directed Growth Plan 

[…]  Improvement   Plan

 […]  Developing Educator Growth Plan

The educator shall have the opportunity to respond in writing to the summative evaluation as per 603 CMR 35.06(6) on the Educator Response Form.

Signature of Evaluator________________________                             Date Completed:________________

Signature of Educator*________________________                            Date Received: ________________

* Signature of the educator indicates acknowledgement of this report; it does not necessarily denote agreement with the contents of the report. Educators have the opportunity to respond to this report in writing and may use the Educator Report Form.

Educator—Name/Title: _____________________________________________

Evaluator—Name/Title: _____________________________________________

 Date and Time of Observation _____________________________________________

Class/Interaction Observed_____________________________________________

Evidence of Practice

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

 Questions For Educator

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

Written feedback on this form must be provided to the educator within 5 school days of the observation. The second page may be used for concerns or commendations. Whenever possible, a conversation may accompany the form. Educators have the opportunity to respond to this form in writing using the Educator Response Form.

Educator—Name/Title:____________________________________________________________

Concerns Raised in Observation

Any concerns raised during an observation must be documented.

_____________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

Commendations

This space may be used to highlight best practice.

_____________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

Evaluator—Name/Title:

Educators have the opportunity to respond to this form in writing. .

Observations resulting in one or more standards judged to be unsatisfactory or needs improvement for the first time must be followed by at least one observation of at least 30 minutes in duration within 30 school days. (Article 29, Section 11Aiii)

Teacher Rubric – Appendix E

Standard I: Curriculum, Planning, and Assessment. The teacher promotes the learning and growth of all students by providing high-quality and coherent instruction, designing and administering authentic and meaningful student assessments, analyzing student performance and growth data, using this data to improve instruction, providing students with constructive feedback on an ongoing basis, and continuously refining learning objectives.

Indicator I-A. Curriculum and Planning: Knows the subject matter well, has a good grasp of child development and how students learn, and designs effective and rigorous standards-based units of instruction consisting of well-structured lessons with measurable objectives

I-A. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

I-A-1.

Subject Matter Knowledge

Demonstrates limited knowledge of the subject matter and/or its pedagogy; relies heavily on textbooks or resources for development of the factual content. Rarely engages students in learning experiences focused on complex knowledge or skills in the subject.

Demonstrates factual knowledge of subject matter and the pedagogy it requires by sometimes engaging students in learning experiences around complex knowledge and skills in the subject.

Demonstrates sound knowledge and understanding of the subject matter and the pedagogy it requires by consistently engaging students in learning experiences that enable them to acquire complex knowledge and skills in the subject.

Demonstrates expertise in subject matter and the pedagogy it requires by engaging all students in learning experiences that enable them to synthesize complex knowledge and skills in the subject. Is able to model this element.

 

I-A-2.

Child and Adolescent Development

Demonstrates little or no knowledge of developmental levels of students this age or differences in how students learn. Typically develops one learning experience for all students that does not enable most students to meet the intended outcomes.

Demonstrates knowledge of developmental levels of students this age but does not identify developmental levels and ways of learning among the students in the class and/or develops learning experiences that enable some, but not all, students to move toward meeting intended outcomes.

Demonstrates knowledge of the developmental levels of students in the classroom and the different ways these students learn by providing differentiated learning experiences that enable all students to progress toward meeting intended outcomes.

Demonstrates expert knowledge of the developmental levels of the teacher’s own students and students in this grade or subject more generally and uses this knowledge to differentiate and expand learning experiences that enable all students to make significant progress toward meeting stated outcomes. Is able to model this element.

 

I-A. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

I-A-3. Rigorous Standards-Based Unit Design

Plans individual lessons rather than units of instruction, or designs units of instruction that are not aligned with state standards/ local curricula, lack measurable outcomes, and/or include tasks that mostly rely on lower level thinking skills.

Designs units of instruction that address some knowledge and skills defined in state standards/local curricula, but some student outcomes are poorly defined and/or tasks rarely require higher-order thinking skills.

Designs units of instruction with measurable outcomes and challenging tasks requiring higher-order thinking skills that enable students to learn the knowledge and skills defined in state standards/local curricula.

Designs integrated units of instruction with measurable, accessible outcomes and challenging tasks requiring higher-order thinking skills that enable students to learn and apply the knowledge and skills defined in state standards/local curricula. Is able to model this element.

I-A-4. Well-Structured Lessons

Develops lessons with inappropriate student engagement strategies, pacing, sequence, activities, materials, resources, and/or grouping for the intended outcome or for the students in the class.

Develops lessons with only some elements of appropriate student engagement strategies, pacing, sequence, activities, materials, resources, and grouping.

Develops well-structured lessons with challenging, measurable objectives and appropriate student engagement strategies, pacing, sequence, activities, materials, resources, technologies, and grouping.

Develops well-structured and highly engaging lessons with challenging, measurable objectives and appropriate student engagement strategies, pacing, sequence, activities, materials, resources, technologies, and grouping to attend to every student’s needs. Is able to model this element.

Indicator I-B. Assessment: Uses a variety of informal and formal methods of assessments to measure student learning, growth, and understanding to develop differentiated and enhanced learning experiences and improve future instruction.

I-B. ElementsI-B-1. Variety of Assessment Methods

Unsatisfactory

Administers only the assessments required by the school and/or measures only point-in-time student achievement.

Needs Improvement

May administer some informal and/or formal assessments to measure student learning but rarely measures student progress toward achieving state/local standards.

Proficient

Designs and administers a variety of informal and formal methods and assessments, including common interim assessments, to measure each student’s learning, growth, and progress toward achieving state/local standards.

Exemplary

Uses an integrated, comprehensive system of informal and formal assessments, including common interim assessments, to measure student learning, growth, and progress toward achieving state/local standards. Is able to model this element.

I-B-2.Adjustment to Practice

Makes few adjustments to practice based on formal and informal assessments.

May organize and analyze some assessment results but only occasionally adjusts practice or modifies future instruction based on the findings.

Organizes and analyzes results from a variety of assessments to determine progress toward intended outcomes and uses these findings to adjust practice and identify and/or implement appropriate differentiated interventions and enhancements for students.

Organizes and analyzes results from a comprehensive system of assessments to determine progress toward intended outcomes and frequently uses these findings to adjust practice and identify and/or implement appropriate differentiated interventions and enhancements for individuals and groups of students and appropriate modifications of lessons and units. Is able to model this element.

Indicator I-C. Analysis: Analyzes data from assessments, draws conclusions, and shares them appropriately.

I-C. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

I-C-1.

Analysis and Conclusions

Does not draw conclusions from student data beyond completing minimal requirements such as grading for report cards.

Draws conclusions from a limited analysis of student data to inform student grading and promotion decisions.

Individually and with colleagues, draws appropriate conclusions from a thorough analysis of a wide range of assessment data to improve student learning.

Individually and with colleagues, draws appropriate, actionable conclusions from a thorough analysis of a wide range of assessment data that improve short-and long-term instructional decisions. Is able to model this element.

I-C-2. Sharing Conclusions With Colleagues

Rarely shares with colleagues conclusions about student progress and/or rarely seeks feedback.

Only occasionally shares with colleagues conclusions about student progress and/or only occasionally seeks feedback from them about practices that will support improved student learning.

Regularly shares with appropriate colleagues (e.g., general education, special education, and English learner staff) conclusions about student progress and seeks feedback from them about instructional or assessment practices that will support improved student learning.

Establishes and implements a schedule and plan for regularly sharing with all appropriate colleagues conclusions and insights about student progress. Seeks and applies feedback from them about practices that will support improved student learning. Is able to model this element.

I-C-3. Sharing Conclusions With Students

Provides little or no feedback on student performance except through grades or report of task completion, or provides inappropriate feedback that does not support students to improve their performance.

Provides some feedback about performance beyond grades but rarely shares strategies for students to improve their performance toward objectives.

Based on assessment results, provides descriptive feedback and engages students and families in constructive conversation that focuses on how students can improve their performance.

Establishes early, constructive feedback loops with students and families that create a dialogue about performance, progress, and improvement. Is able to model this element.

Standard II: Teaching All Students. The teacher promotes the learning and growth of all students through instructional practices that establish high expectations, create a safe and effective classroom environment, and demonstrate cultural proficiency.

Indicator II-A. Instruction: Uses instructional practices that reflect high expectations regarding content and quality of effort and work; engage all students; and are personalized to accommodate diverse learning styles, needs, interests, and levels of readiness.

II-A. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

II-A-1. Quality of Effort and Work

Establishes no or low expectations around quality of work and effort and/or offers few supports for students to produce quality work or effort.

May states high expectations for quality and effort, but provides few exemplars and rubrics, limited guided practice, and/or few other supports to help students know what is expected of them; may establish inappropriately low expectations for quality and effort.

Consistently defines high expectations for the quality of student work and the perseverance and effort required to produce it; often provides exemplars, rubrics, and guided practice.

Consistently defines high expectations for quality work and effort and effectively supports students to set high expectations for each other to persevere and produce high-quality work. Is able to model this element.

II-A-2. Student Engagement

Uses instructional practices that leave most students uninvolved and/or passive participants.

Uses instructional practices that motivate and engage some students but leave others uninvolved and/or passive participants.

Consistently uses instructional practices that are likely to motivate and engage most students during the lesson.

Consistently uses instructional practices that typically motivate and engage most students both during the lesson and during independent work and home work. Is able to model this element.

II-A-3. Meeting Diverse Needs

Uses limited and/or inappropriate practices to accommodate differences.

May use some appropriate practices to accommodate differences, but fails to address an adequate range of differences.

Uses appropriate practices, including tiered instruction and scaffolds, to accommodate differences in learning styles, needs, interests, and levels of readiness, including those of students with disabilities and English learners.

Uses a varied repertoire of practices to create structured opportunities for each student to meet or exceed state standards/local curriculum and behavioral expectations. Is able to model this element.

Note: At the Exemplary level, an educator’s level of expertise is such that he or she is able to model this element through training, teaching, coaching, assisting, and/or demonstrating. In this rubric, this level of expertise is denoted by “Is able to model.”

Indicator II-B. Learning Environment: Creates and maintains a safe and collaborative learning environment that motivates students to take academic risks, challenge themselves, and claim ownership of their learning.

II-B. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

II-B-1.

Safe Learning Environment

Maintains a physical environment that is unsafe or does not support student learning. Uses inappropriate or ineffective rituals, routines, and/or responses to reinforce positive behavior or respond to behaviors that interfere with students’ learning.

May create and maintain a safe physical environment but inconsistently maintains rituals, routines, and responses needed to prevent and/or stop behaviors that interfere with all students’ learning.

Uses rituals, routines, and appropriate responses that create and maintain a safe physical and intellectual environment where students take academic risks and most behaviors that interfere with learning are prevented.

Uses rituals, routines, and proactive responses that create and maintain a safe physical and intellectual environment where students take academic risks and play an active role—individually and col-lectively—in preventing behaviors that interfere with learning. Is able to model this element.

II-B-2.

Collaborative Learning Environment

Makes little effort to teach interpersonal, group, and communication skills or facilitate student work in groups, or such attempts are ineffective.

Teaches some interpersonal, group, and communication skills and provides some opportunities for students to work in groups.

Develops students’ interpersonal, group, and communication skills and provides opportunities for students to learn in groups with diverse peers.

Teaches and reinforces interpersonal, group, and communication skills so that students seek out their peers as resources. Is able to model this practice.

II-B-3. Student Motivation

Directs all learning experiences, providing few, if any, opportunities for students to take academic risks or challenge themselves to learn.

Creates some learning experiences that guide students to identify needs, ask for support, and challenge themselves to take academic risks.

Consistently creates learning experiences that guide students to identify their strengths, interests, and needs; ask for support when appropriate; take academic risks; and challenge themselves to learn.

Consistently supports students to identify strengths, interests, and needs; ask for support; take risks; challenge themselves; set learning goals; and monitor their own progress. Models these skills for colleagues.

Indicator II-C. Cultural Proficiency: Actively creates and maintains an environment in which students’ diverse backgrounds, identities, strengths, and challenges are respected.

II-C. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

II-C-1.

Respects

Differences

Establishes an environment in which students demonstrate limited respect for individual differences.

Establishes an environment in which students generally demonstrate respect for individual differences

Consistently uses strategies and practices that are likely to enable students to demonstrate respect for and affirm their own and others’ differences related to background, identity, language, strengths, and challenges.

Establishes an environment in which students respect and affirm their own and others’ differences and are supported to share and explore differences and similarities related to background, identity, language, strengths, and challenges. Is able to model this practice.

II-C-2. Maintains Respectful Environment

Minimizes or ignores conflicts and/or responds in inappropriate ways.

Anticipates and responds appropriately to some conflicts or misunderstandings but ignores and/or minimizes others.

Anticipates and responds appropriately to conflicts or misunderstandings arising from differences in backgrounds, languages, and identities.

Anticipates and responds appropriately to conflicts or misunderstandings arising from differences in backgrounds, languages, and identities in ways that lead students to be able to do the same independently. Is able to model this practice.

Indicator II-D. Expectations: Plans and implements lessons that set clear and high expectations and also make knowledge accessible for all students.

II-D. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

II-D-1.

Clear Expectations

Does not make specific academic and behavior expectations clear to students.

May announce and post classroom academic and behavior rules and consequences, but inconsistently or ineffectively enforces them.

Clearly communicates and consistently enforces specific standards for student work, effort, and behavior.

Clearly communicates and consistently enforces specific standards for student work, effort, and behavior so that most students are able to describe them and take ownership of meeting them. Is able to model this element.

II-D-2. High Expectations

Gives up on some students or communicates that some cannot master challenging material.

May tell students that the subject or assignment is challenging and that they need to work hard but does little to counteract student misconceptions about innate ability.

Effectively models and reinforces ways that students can master challenging material through effective effort, rather than having to depend on innate ability.

Effectively models and reinforces ways that students can consistently master challenging material through effective effort. Successfully challenges students’ misconceptions about innate ability. Is able to model this element.

II-D-3. Access to Knowledge

Rarely adapts instruction, materials, and assessments to make challenging material accessible to all students.

Occasionally adapts instruction, materials, and assessments to make challenging material accessible to all students.

Consistently adapts instruction, materials, and assessments to make challenging material accessible to all students, including English learners and students with disabilities.

Individually and with colleagues, consistently adapts instruction, materials, and assessments to make challenging material accessible to all students, including English learners and students with disabilities. Is able to model this element.

Standard III: Family and Community Engagement. The teacher promotes the learning and growth of all students through effective partnerships with families, caregivers, community members, and organizations.

Indicator III-A. Engagement: Welcomes and encourages every family to become active participants in the classroom and school community.

III-A. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

III-A-1.

Parent/Family

Engagement

Does not welcome families to become participants in the classroom and school community or actively discourages their participation.

Makes limited attempts to involve families in school and/or classroom activities, meetings, and planning.

Uses a variety of strategies to support every family to participate actively and appropriately in the classroom and school community.

Successfully engages most families and sustains their active and appropriate participation in the classroom and school community. Is able to model this element.

Indicator III-B. Collaboration: Collaborates with families to create and implement strategies for supporting student learning and development both at home and at school.

III-B. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

III-B-1. Learning Expectations

 

Does not inform parents about learning or behavior expectations.

Sends home only a list of classroom rules and the learning outline or syllabus for the year.

Consistently provides parents with clear, user-friendly expectations for student learning and behavior.

Successfully conveys to most parents student learning and behavior expectations. Is able to model this element.

III-B-2. Curriculum Support

Rarely, if ever, communicates with parents on ways to support children at home or at school.

Sends home occasional suggestions on how parents can support children at home or at school.

Regularly updates parents on curriculum throughout the year and suggests strategies for supporting learning at school and home, including appropriate adaptation for students with disabilities or limited English proficiency.

Successfully prompts most families to use one or more of the strategies suggested for supporting learning at school and home and seeks out evidence of their impact. Is able to model this element.

Indicator III-C. Communication: Engages in regular, two-way, and culturally proficient communication with families about student learning and performance.

III-C. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

III-C-1. Two-Way Communication

Rarely communicates with families except through report cards; rarely solicits or responds promptly and carefully to communications from families.

Relies primarily on newsletters and other one-way media and usually responds promptly to communications from families.

Regularly uses two-way communication with families about student performance and learning and responds promptly and carefully to communications from families.

Regularly uses a two-way system that supports frequent, proactive, and personalized communication with families about student performance and learning. Is able to model this element.

III-C-2. Culturally Proficient Communication

Makes few attempts to respond to different family cultural norms and/or responds inappropriately or disrespectfully.

May communicate respectfully and make efforts to take into account different families’ home language, culture, and values, but does so inconsistently or does not demonstrate understanding and sensitivity to the differences.

Always communicates respectfully with families and demonstrates understanding of and sensitivity to different families’ home language, culture, and values.

Always communicates respectfully with families and demonstrates understanding and appreciation of different families’ home language, culture, and values. Is able to model this element.

Indicator IV-A. Reflection: Demonstrates the capacity to reflect on and improve the educator’s own practice, using informal means as well as meetings with teams and work groups to gather information, analyze data, examine issues, set meaningful goals, and develop new approaches in order to improve teaching and learning.

IV-A. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-A-1. Reflective Practice

Demonstrates limited reflection on practice and/or use of insights gained to improve practice.

May reflect on the effectiveness of lessons/ units and interactions with students but not with colleagues and/or rarely uses insights to improve practice.

Regularly reflects on the effectiveness of lessons, units, and interactions with students, both individually and with colleagues, and uses insights gained to improve practice and student learning.

Regularly reflects on the effectiveness of lessons, units, and interactions with students, both individually and with colleagues; and uses and shares with colleagues, insights gained to improve practice and student learning. Is able to model this element.

IV-A-2. Goal Setting

Generally, participates passively in the goal-setting process and/or proposes goals that are vague or easy to reach.

Proposes goals that are sometimes vague or easy to achieve and/or bases goals on a limited self-assessment and analysis of student learning data.

Proposes challenging, measurable professional practice, team, and student learning goals that are based on thorough self-assessment and analysis of student learning data.

Individually and with colleagues builds capacity to propose and monitor challenging, measurable goals based on thorough self-assessment and analysis of student learning data. Is able to model this element.

Indicator IV-B. Professional Growth: Actively pursues professional development and learning opportunities to improve quality of practice or build the expertise and experience to assume different instructional and leadership roles.

IV-B. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-B-1. Professional Learning and Growth

Participates in few, if any, professional development and learning opportunities to improve practice and/or applies little new learning to practice.

Participates only in required professional development activities and/or inconsistently or inappropriately applies new learning to improve practice.

Consistently seeks out and applies, when appropriate, ideas for improving practice from supervisors, colleagues, professional development activities, and other resources to gain expertise and/or assume different instruction and leadership responsibilities.

Consistently seeks out professional development and learning opportunities that improve practice and build expertise of self and other educators in instruction and leadership. Is able to model this element.

Indicator IV-C. Collaboration: Collaborates effectively with colleagues on a wide range of tasks.

IV-C. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-C-1.

Professional Collaboration

Rarely and/or ineffectively collaborates with colleagues; conversations often lack focus on improving student learning.

Does not consistently collaborate with colleagues in ways that support productive team effort.

Consistently and effectively collaborates with colleagues in such work as developing standards-based units, examining student work, analyzing student performance, and planning appropriate intervention.

Supports colleagues to collaborate in areas such as developing standards-based units, examining student work, analyzing student performance, and planning appropriate intervention. Is able to model this element.

Indicator IV-D. Decision-Making: Becomes involved in schoolwide decision making, and takes an active role in school improvement planning.

IV-D. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-D-1. Decision-Making

Participates in planning and decision making at the school, department, and/or grade level only when asked and rarely contributes relevant ideas or expertise.

May participate in planning and decision making at the school, department, and/or grade level but rarely contributes relevant ideas or expertise.

Consistently contributes relevant ideas and expertise to planning and decision making at the school, department, and/or grade level.

I In planning and decision-making at the school, department, and/or grade level, consistently contributes ideas and expertise that are critical to school improvement efforts. Is able to model this element.

Indicator IV-E. Shared Responsibility: Shares responsibility for the performance of all students within the school.

IV-E. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-E-1. Shared Responsibility

Rarely reinforces schoolwide behavior and learning expectations for all students and/or makes a limited contribution to their learning by rarely sharing responsibility for meeting their needs.

Within and beyond the classroom, inconsistently reinforces schoolwide behavior and learning expectations for all students, and/or makes a limited contribution to their learning by inconsistently sharing responsibility for meeting their needs.

Within and beyond the classroom, consistently reinforces schoolwide behavior and learning expectations for all students, and contributes to their learning by sharing responsibility for meeting their needs.

Individually and with col-leaguesdevelops strategies and actions that contribute to the learning and productive behavior of all students at the school. Is able to model this element.

Indicator IV-F. Professional Responsibilities: Is ethical and reliable, and meets routine responsibilities consistently.

IV-F. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-F-1. Judgment

Demonstrates poor judgment and/or discloses confidential student information inappropriately.

Sometimes demonstrates questionable judgment and/or inadvertently shares confidential information.

Demonstrates sound judgment reflecting integrity, honesty, fairness, and trustworthiness and protects student confidentiality appropriately.

Demonstrates sound judgment and acts appropriately to protect student confidentiality, rights and safety. Is able to model this element.

IV-F-2. Reliability & Responsibility

Frequently misses or is late to assignments, makes errors in records, and/or misses paperwork deadlines; frequently late or absent.

Occasionally misses or is late to assignments, completes work late, and/or makes errors in records.

Consistently fulfills professional responsibilities; is consistently punctual and reliable with paperwork, duties, and assignments; and is rarely late or absent from school.

Consistently fulfills all professional responsibilities to high standards. Is able to model this element.

Specialized Instructional Support Personnel - Appendix F

Standard I: Curriculum, Planning, and Assessment. promotes the learning and growth of all students by providing high-quality and coherent instruction, designing and administering authentic and meaningful student assessments, analyzing student performance and growth data, using this data to improve instruction, providing students with constructive feedback on an ongoing basis, and continuously refining learning objectives.

Indicator l-A.    Curriculum and Planning: Has strong knowledge specific to subject matter and/or professional responsibility, has a good grasp of child development and how students learn, and designs effective and rigorous plans for support consisting of well-structured lessons with measurable outcomes.

I-A. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

l-A-1. Professional Knowledge

Demonstrates limited professional knowledge; relies heavily on outdated practices as opposed to current practices supported by research. Rarely engages students in academic, behavioral, and social/emotional learning experiences through the use of educational and/or clinical practices.

Demonstrates factual knowledge of the professional content and delivery and sometimes applies it to engage students in academic, behavioral, and social/emotional learning experiences through the use of educational and/or clinical practices.

Demonstrates sound knowledge and understanding of professional content and delivery by consistently engaging students in academic, behavioral, and social/emotional learning experiences through the use of educational and/or clinical practices that enable students to acquire knowledge and skills.

Demonstrates mastery of professional content and its delivery by engaging all students in academic, behavioral, and social/emotional learning experiences, through the use of educational and/or clinical practices, that enable students to synthesize knowledge and skills. Is able to model this element.

l-A-2. Child and Adolescent   Development

Demonstrates little or no knowledge of child and adolescent development; typically develops one learning experience, and/or type of support or assistance for all students that does not adequately address intended outcomes.

Demonstrates general knowledge of child and adolescent development but does not apply this knowledge when providing differentiated learning experiences, support, and/or assistance that would enable all students—as opposed to just some—to move toward meeting intended outcomes.

Demonstrates knowledge of students' developmental levels and the different ways these students learn or behave by providing differentiated learning experiences, support, and/or assistance that enable all students to progress toward meeting intended outcomes.

Demonstrates expert knowledge of the developmental levels of individual students and students in the grade or subject more generally and uses this knowledge to differentiate and expand learning experiences, supports, and/or types of assistance, enabling all students to make significant progress toward meeting stated outcomes. Is able to model this element.

1-A-3 Plan Development10

Develops or contributes to the development of plans that are not timely and/or not tailored to the needs of individual students; or, plans do not include appropriate supports or measurable outcomes that would enable students to meet the goals and objectives of the plan.

Develops or contributes to the timely development of plans that respond to some but not all relevant individual student needs, and/or plans that lack sufficient measurable outcomes or supports that enable students to meet all goals and objectives of the plan.

Develops or contributes to the timely development of well-structured plans with measurable outcomes that respond to all relevant individual student needs, and include supports that enable students to meet the goals or objectives of the plan.

Develops or contributes to the timely development of comprehensive, well-structured plans with measurable outcomes that respond to all relevant individual student needs, are coordinated with other plans relevant to those students, and include supports that enable students to meet all goals or objectives of the plan. Is able to model this element.

I-A-4. Well-Structured Lessons

Develops lessons (which may include individual and group activities or sessions) with inappropriate student engagement strategies, pacing, sequence, activities, materials, resources, and/or grouping.

Develops lessons (which may include individual and group activities or sessions) with only some elements of appropriate student engagement strategies, pacing, sequence, activities, materials, resources, and grouping.

Develops well-structured lessons (which may include individual and group activities or sessions) with challenging, measurable objectives and appropriate student engagement strategies, pacing, sequence, activities, materials, resources, technologies, and grouping.

Develops well-structured and highly engaging lessons (which may include individual and group activities and sessions) with challenging, measurable objectives and appropriate student engagement strategies, pacing, sequence, activities, materials, resources, technologies, and grouping to attend to every student’s needs. Is able to model this element.

Indicator I-B. Assessment: Uses a variety of informal and formal methods of assessments to measure student learning, growth, and understanding to develop differentiated and enhanced learning experiences and improve future instruction.

I-B. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

I-B-1.

Variety of Assessment Methods

Administers assessments and/or collects only the data required by the school and/or measures only point-in-time student achievement or development.

May design and administer assessments and/or collect some data to measure student learning, growth, or development, but uses a limited range of methods.

Designs and administers assessments and/or collects data to measure student learning, growth, and/or development through a variety of methods, including informal and formal assessments and common interim assessments where applicable.

Uses an integrated, comprehensive assessment system, including informal and formal assessment methods and common interim assessments where applicable, to measure student learning, growth, and development. Is able to model this element.

I-B-2.

Adjustment to Practice

Makes few adjustments to practice by identifying and/or implementing appropriate differentiated interventions, supports, and programs based on formal and informal assessments.

May organize and analyze some assessment results but only occasionally adjusts practice and identifies and/or implements appropriate differentiated interventions, supports, and programs for students.

Organizes and analyzes results from a variety of assessments to determine progress toward intended outcomes and uses these findings to adjust practice and identify and/or implement appropriate differentiated interventions, supports, and programs for students.

Organizes and analyzes results from a comprehensive system of assessments to determine progress toward intended outcomes and frequently uses these findings to adjust practice and identify and/or implement appropriate differentiated interventions, supports, or programs for individuals and groups of students and appropriate modifications of plans. Is able to model this element.

Indicator I-C. Analysis: Analyzes data from assessments, draws conclusions, and shares them appropriately.

I-C. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

I-C-1.

Analysis and Conclusions

Does not analyze data and/or draw conclusions from data beyond completing minimal requirements.

Draws conclusions from a limited analysis of data to inform student learning, growth, and development.

Individually and with colleagues, draws appropriate conclusions about programs, plans, and practices from a thorough analysis of a wide range of data to improve student learning, growth, and development.

Individually and with colleagues, draws appropriate, actionable conclusions about programs, plans, and practices from a thorough analysis of a wide range of data that improve short-and long-term planning decisions. Is able to model this element.

I-C-2. Sharing Conclusions With Colleagues

Rarely shares with colleagues conclusions about student progress and/or rarely seeks feedback from them about practices that will support improved student learning and/or development.

Only occasionally shares with colleagues conclusions about student progress and/or seeks feedback from them about practices that will support improved student learning and/or development.

Regularly shares with appropriate colleagues (e.g., classroom teachers, administrators, and professional support personnel) conclusions about student progress and seeks feedback from them about practices that will support improved student learning and/or development.

Establishes and implements a schedule and plan for regularly sharing with all appropriate colleagues (e.g., classroom teachers, administrators, and professional support personnel) conclusions and insights about student progress. Seeks and applies feedback from them about practices that will support improved student learning and/or development. Is able to model this element.

I-C-3. Sharing Conclusions With Students and Families

Provides little or no feedback on student growth or progress except through minimally required reporting or provides inappropriate feedback that does not support students to grow and improve.

Provides some feedback about student growth or progress beyond required reports but rarely shares strategies for students to grow and improve.

Based on assessment results and/or other data, provides descriptive feedback and engages students and families in constructive conversation that focuses on student growth and improvement.

Establishes early, constructive feedback loops with students and families that create a dialogue about student growth, progress, and improvement. Is able to model this element.

Standard II: Teaching All Students. Promotes the learning and growth of all students through instructional practices that establish high expectations, create a safe and effective classroom environment, and demonstrate cultural proficiency.

Indicator II-A. Instruction: Uses instructional and clinical practices that reflect high expectations regarding content and quality of effort and work; engage all students; and are personalized to accommodate diverse learning styles, needs, interests, and levels of readiness.

II-A. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

II-A-1. Quality of Effort and Work

Establishes no or low expectations for student work and behavior and/or offers few supports to help students know what is expected of them.

May state high expectations for student work and behavior, but provides few exemplars and rubrics, or limited guided practice, and/or few other supports to help students know what is expected of them.

Consistently defines high expectations for student work and behavior, and the perseverance and effort required to produce it; often provides exemplars, rubrics, or guided practice, and/or models appropriate behaviors.

Consistently defines high expectations for student work and behavior and effectively supports students to set high expectations for each other to persevere and produce high-quality work. Is able to model this element.

II-A-2. Student Engagement

Uses instructional and/or clinical practices that leave most students uninvolved and/or passive.

Uses instructional and/or clinical practices that motivate and engage some students but leave others uninvolved and/or passive.

Consistently uses instructional and clinical practices that are likely to motivate and engage most students during the lesson, activity, or session.

Consistently uses instructional and clinical practices that typically motivate and engage most students during the lesson, activity, or session, and during independent work. Is able to model this element.

II-A-3. Meeting Diverse Needs

Uses limited and/or inappropriate practices and/or supports to accommodate differences.

May use some appropriate practices and/or supports to accommodate differences, but fails to address an adequate range of differences.

Uses appropriate practices, including tiered instruction, scaffolds, and other supports, to accommodate differences in learning styles, needs, interests, and levels of readiness, including those of students with disabilities and English learners.

Uses a varied repertoire of practices and/or supports to create structured opportunities for each student to meet or exceed expectations for growth and development. Is able to model this element.

Indicator II-B. Learning Environment: Creates and maintains a safe and collaborative learning environment that motivates students to take academic risks, challenge themselves, and claim ownership of their learning.

II-B. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

II-B-1. Safe Learning Environment

Maintains a physical environment that is unsafe or does not support student learning. Uses inappropriate or ineffective rituals, routines, and/or responses to reinforce positive behavior or respond to behaviors that interfere with students’ learning.

May create and maintain a safe physical environment but inconsistently maintains rituals, routines, and responses needed to prevent and/or stop behaviors that interfere with all students’ learning.

Uses rituals, routines, and appropriate responses that create and maintain a safe physical and intellectual environment where students take academic risks and most behaviors that interfere with learning are prevented.

Uses rituals, routines, and proactive responses that create and maintain a safe physical and intellectual environment where students take academic risks and play an active role— individually and collectively—in preventing behaviors that interfere with learning. Is able to model this element.

II-B-2. Collaborative Learning Environment

Makes little effort to teach interpersonal, group, and communication skills or facilitate student work in groups, or such attempts are ineffective.

Teaches some interpersonal, group, and communication skills and provides some opportunities for students to work in groups.

Develops students’ interpersonal, group, and communication skills and provides opportunities for students to learn in groups with diverse peers.

Teaches and reinforces interpersonal, group, and communication skills so that students seek out their peers as resources. Is able to model this practice.

II-B-2. Student Motivation

Directs all learning experiences, providing few, if any, opportunities for students to take risks or challenge themselves.

Creates some learning experiences that guide students to identify needs, ask for support, and challenge themselves to take risks.

Consistently creates learning experiences that guide students to identify their strengths, interests, and needs; ask for support when appropriate; take risks; and challenge themselves to succeed.

Consistently supports students to identify their strengths, interests, and needs; ask for support; take risks; challenge themselves; set learning goals; and monitor their own progress. Is able to model this element.

Indicator II-C. Cultural Proficiency: Actively creates and maintains an environment in which students’ diverse backgrounds, identities, strengths, and challenges are respected.

II-C. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

II-C-1. Respects Differences

Establishes an environment in which students demonstrate limited respect for individual differences.

Establishes an environment in which students generally demonstrate respect for individual differences.

Consistently uses strategies and practices that are likely to enable students to demonstrate respect for and affirm their own and others’ differences related to background, identity, language, strengths, and challenges.

Establishes an environment in which students respect and affirm their own and others’ differences and are supported to share and explore differences and similarities related to background, identity, language, strengths, and challenges. Is able to model this element.

II-C-2. Maintains Respectful Environment

Minimizes or ignores conflicts and/or responds in inappropriate ways.

Anticipates and responds appropriately to some conflicts or misunderstandings but ignores and/or minimizes others.

Anticipates and responds appropriately to conflicts or misunderstandings arising from differences in backgrounds, languages, and identities.

Anticipates and responds appropriately to conflicts or misunderstandings arising from differences in backgrounds, languages, and identities in ways that lead students to be able to do the same independently. Is able to model this element.

Indicator II-D. Expectations: Plans and implements lessons and/or supports that set clear and high expectations and also make knowledge, information, and/or supports accessible for all students.

II-D. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

II-D-1. Clear Expectations

Does not make specific standards for student work, effort, interactions, and behavior clear to students.

May communicate specific standards for student work, effort, interactions, and behavior, but inconsistently or ineffectively enforces them.

Clearly communicates and consistently enforces specific standards for student work, effort, and behavior.

Clearly communicates and consistently enforces specific standards for student work, effort, interactions, and behavior so that most students are able to describe them and take ownership of meeting them. Is able to model this element.

II-D-2. High Expectations

Gives up on some students or communicates that some cannot accomplish challenging goals. .

May tell students that a goal is challenging and that they need to work hard but does not model ways students can accomplish the goal through effective effort. .

Effectively models and reinforces ways that students can set and accomplish challenging goals through effective effort, rather than having to depend on innate ability.

Effectively models and reinforces ways that students can consistently accomplish challenging goals through effective effort. Successfully challenges students’ misconceptions about innate ability. Is able to model this element.

II-D-3. Access to Knowledge

Rarely adapts instruction, services, plans, communication, and/or assessments to make curriculum/supports accessible to all students for whom the educator has responsibility.

Occasionally adapts instruction, services, plans, communication, and/or assessments to make curriculum/supports accessible to all students for whom the educator has responsibility.

Consistently adapts instruction, services, plans, communication, and/or assessments to make curriculum/ supports accessible to all students for whom the educator has responsibility, including English learners and students with disabilities.

Individually and with colleagues, consistently adapts instruction, services, plans, communication, and/or assessments to make curriculum/supports accessible to all students for whom the educator has responsibility, including English learners and students with disabilities. Is able to model this element.

Standard III: Family and Community Engagement. Promotes the learning and growth of all students through effective partnerships with families, caregivers, community members, and organizations.

Indicator III-A. Engagement: Welcomes and encourages every family to become active participants in the classroom and school community.

III-A. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

III-A-1. Parent/Family Engagement

Does not welcome families to become participants in the classroom and school community or actively discourages their participation.

Makes limited attempts to involve families in school and/or classroom activities, meetings, and planning.

Uses a variety of strategies to support families to participate actively and appropriately in the classroom and school community.

Successfully engages most families and sustains their active and appropriate participation in the classroom and school community. Is able to model this element.

Indicator III-B. Collaboration: Collaborates with families to create and implement strategies for supporting student learning and development both at home and at school.

III-B. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

III-B-1. Learning Expectations

Does not inform parents about learning, behavior, and/or wellness expectations.

Sends home only a list of rules/expectations and an outline of the student learning, behavior, or wellness plan for the year.

Consistently provides parents with clear, user-friendly expectations for student learning, behavior, and/or wellness.

Successfully conveys to most parents clear, user-friendly student learning, behavior, and wellness expectations. Is able to model this element.

III-B-2. Student Support

Rarely, if ever, communicates with parents on ways to support learning and development at home or at school.

Sends home occasional suggestions on how parents can support learning and development at home or at school.

Regularly communicates with parents to create, share, and/or identify strategies for supporting learning and development at school and home.

Regularly communicates with parents to share and/or identify strategies for supporting learning and development at school and home, successfully encourages most families to use at least one of these strategies, and seeks out evidence of their impact. Is able to model this element.

Indicator III-C. Communication: Engages in regular, two-way, and culturally proficient communication with families about student learning, behavior and wellness.

III-C. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

III-C-1. Two-Way Communication

Rarely communicates with families except through required reports; rarely solicits or responds promptly to communications from families.

Relies primarily on sharing general information and announcements with families through one-way media and usually responds promptly to communications from families.

Regularly uses two-way communication with families about student learning, behavior, and wellness; responds promptly and carefully to communications from families.

Regularly uses a two-way system that supports frequent, proactive, and personalized communication with families about individual student learning, behavior, and wellness. Is able to model this element.

III-C-2. Culturally Proficient Communication

Makes few attempts to respond to different family cultural norms and/or responds inappropriately or disrespectfully.

May communicate respectfully and make efforts to take into account different families’ home language, culture, and values, but does so inconsistently or does not demonstrate understanding and sensitivity to the differences.

Always communicates respectfully with families and demonstrates understanding of and sensitivity to different families’ home language, culture, and values.

Always communicates respectfully with families and demonstrates understanding and appreciation of different families’ home language, culture, and values. Is able to model this element.

Standard IV: Professional Culture. Promotes the learning and growth of all students through ethical, culturally proficient, skilled, and collaborative practice.

Indicator IV-A. Reflection: Demonstrates the capacity to reflect on and improve the educator’s own practice, using informal means as well as meetings with teams and work groups to gather information, analyze data, examine issues, set meaningful goals, and develop new approaches in order to improve teaching and learning.

IV-A. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-A-1. Reflective Practice

Demonstrates limited reflection on practice and/or use of insights gained to improve practice.

May reflect on the effectiveness of instruction, supports, and interactions with students but not with colleagues and/or rarely uses insights gained to improve practice.

Regularly reflects on the effectiveness of instruction, supports, and interactions with students, both individually and with colleagues, and uses insights gained to improve practice and student outcomes.

Regularly reflects on the effectiveness of instruction, supports, and interactions with students, both individually and with colleagues; and uses and shares with colleagues insights gained to improve practice and student outcomes. Is able to model this element.

IV-A-2. Goal Setting

Participates passively in the goal-setting process and/or proposes goals that are vague or easy to reach.

Proposes one goal that is vague or easy to achieve and/or bases goals on a limited self-assessment and analysis of student data.

Proposes challenging, measurable professional practice, team, and student learning goals that are based on thorough self-assessment and analysis of student data.

Individually and with colleagues builds capacity to propose and monitor challenging, measurable goals based on thorough self-assessment and analysis of student data. Is able to model this element.

Indicator IV-B. Professional Growth: Actively pursues professional development and learning opportunities to improve quality of practice or build the expertise and experience to assume different instructional and leadership roles.

IV-B. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-B-1. Professional Learning and Growth

Participates in few, if any, professional development and learning opportunities to improve practice and/or applies little new learning to practice.

Participates only in required professional development and learning activities and/or inconsistently or inappropriately applies new learning to improve practice.

Consistently seeks out and applies, when appropriate, ideas for improving practice from supervisors, colleagues, professional development activities, and other resources to gain expertise and/or assume different instruction and leadership responsibilities.

Consistently seeks out professional development and learning opportunities that improve practice and build expertise of self and other educators in instruction, academic support, and leadership. Is able to model this element.

Indicator IV-C. Collaboration: Collaborates effectively with colleagues on a wide range of tasks.

IV-C. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-C-1. Professional Collaboration

Rarely and/or ineffectively collaborates with colleagues; conversations often lack focus on student performance and/or development.

Does not consistently collaborate with colleagues in ways that support productive team effort.

Consistently and effectively collaborates with colleagues through shared planning and/or informal conversation in such work as: analyzing student performance and development and planning appropriate interventions at the classroom or school level.

Facilitates effective collaboration among colleagues through shared planning and/or informal conversation in such work as analyzing student performance and development and planning appropriate, comprehensive interventions at the classroom and school level. Is able to model this element.

IV-C-2. Consultation

Regularly provides inappropriate advice; does not provide advice and expertise to general education teachers or other colleagues unless prompted to do so; and/or fails to offer advice when appropriate.

Provides advice and expertise to support general education teachers and other colleagues to create appropriate and effective academic, behavioral, and social/emotional learning experiences for only some students for whom responsibility is shared, or sometimes provides advice that is inappropriate or poorly customized.

Regularly provides appropriate advice and expertise that is customized to support general education teachers and other colleagues to create appropriate and effective academic, behavioral, and social/emotional learning experiences for students for whom responsibility is shared.

Utilizes a variety of means to regularly provide advice and expertise that is customized to support general education teachers and other colleagues to successfully create appropriate and effective academic, behavioral, and social/emotional learning experiences for students. Is able to model this element.

Indicator IV-D. Decision-Making: Becomes involved in schoolwide decision making, and takes an active role in school improvement planning.

IV-D. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-D-1. Decision-Making

Participates in planning and decision making at the school, department, and/or grade level only when asked and rarely contributes relevant ideas or expertise.

May participate in planning and decision making at the school, department, and/or grade level but rarely contributes relevant ideas or expertise.

Consistently contributes relevant ideas and expertise to planning and decision making at the school, department, and/or grade level.

In planning and decision-making at the school, department, and/or grade level, consistently contributes ideas and expertise that are critical to school improvement efforts. Is able to model this element.

Indicator IV-E. Shared Responsibility: Shares responsibility for the performance of all students within the school.

IV-E. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-E-1. Shared Responsibility

Rarely reinforces schoolwide behavior and learning expectations for all students and/or makes a limited contribution to their learning by rarely sharing responsibility for meeting their needs.

Within and beyond the classroom, inconsistently reinforces schoolwide behavior and learning expectations for all students, and/or makes a limited contribution to their learning by inconsistently sharing responsibility for meeting their needs.

Within and beyond the classroom, consistently reinforces school-wide behavior and learning expectations for all students, and contributes to their learning by sharing responsibility for meeting their needs.

Individually and with colleagues, develops strategies and actions that contribute to the learning and productive behavior of all students at the school. Is able to model this element.

Indicator IV-F. Professional Responsibilities: Is ethical and reliable, and meets routine responsibilities consistently.

IV-F. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-F-1. Judgment

Demonstrates poor judgment and/or discloses confidential student information inappropriately.

Sometimes demonstrates questionable judgment and/or inadvertently shares confidential information.

Demonstrates sound judgment reflecting integrity, honesty, fairness, and trustworthiness and protects student confidentiality appropriately.

Demonstrates sound judgment and acts appropriately to protect student confidentiality, rights and safety. Is able to model this element.

IV-F-2. Reliability & Responsibility

Frequently misses or is late to assignments, makes errors in records, and/or misses paperwork deadlines; frequently late or absent.

Occasionally misses or is late to assignments, completes work late, and/or makes errors in records.

Consistently fulfills professional responsibilities; is consistently punctual and reliable with paperwork, duties, and assignments; and is rarely late or absent from school.

Consistently fulfills all professional responsibilities to high standards. Is able to model this element.

Department Chair Rubric – Appendix G

Standard I: Curriculum, Planning, and Assessment. The teacher promotes the learning and growth of all students by providing high-quality and coherent instruction, designing and administering authentic and meaningful student assessments, analyzing student performance and growth data, using this data to improve instruction, providing students with constructive feedback on an ongoing basis, and continuously refining learning objectives.

Indicator I-A. Curriculum and Planning: Knows the subject matter well, has a good grasp of child development and how students learn, and designs effective and rigorous standards-based units of instruction consisting of well-structured lessons with measurable outcomes.

I-A. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

I-A-1. Subject Matter Knowledge

Demonstrates limited knowledge of the subject matter and/or its pedagogy; relies heavily on textbooks or resources for development of the factual content. Rarely engages students in learning experiences focused on complex knowledge or skills in the subject.

Demonstrates factual knowledge of subject matter and the pedagogy it requires by sometimes engaging students in learning experiences around complex knowledge and skills in the subject.

Demonstrates sound knowledge and understanding of the subject matter and the pedagogy it requires by consistently engaging students in learning experiences that enable them to acquire complex knowledge and skills in the subject.

Demonstrates expertise in subject matter and the pedagogy it requires by engaging all students in learning experiences that enable them to synthesize complex knowledge and skills in the subject. Is able to model this element.

I-A-2. Child and Adolescent Development

Demonstrates little or no knowledge of developmental levels of students this age or differences in how students learn. Typically develops one learning experience for all students that does not enable most students to meet the intended outcomes.

Demonstrates knowledge of developmental levels of students this age but does not identify developmental levels and ways of learning among the students in the class and/or develops learning experiences that enable some, but not all, students to move toward meeting intended outcomes.

Demonstrates knowledge of the developmental levels of students in the classroom and the different ways these students learn by providing differentiated learning experiences that enable all students to progress toward meeting intended outcomes.

Demonstrates expert knowledge of the developmental levels of the teacher’s own students and students in this grade or subject more generally and uses this knowledge to differentiate and expand learning experiences that enable all students to make significant progress toward meeting stated outcomes. Is able to model this element.

I-A-3. Rigorous Standards-Based Unit Design

Plans individual lessons rather than units of instruction, or designs units of instruction that are not aligned with state standards/ local curricula, lack measurable outcomes, and/or include tasks that mostly rely on lower level thinking skills.

Designs units of instruction that address some knowledge and skills defined in state standards/local curricula, but some student outcomes are poorly defined and/or tasks rarely require higher-order thinking skills.

Designs units of instruction with measurable outcomes and challenging tasks requiring higher-order thinking skills that enable students to learn the knowledge and skills defined in state standards/local curricula.

Designs integrated units of instruction with measurable, accessible outcomes and challenging tasks requiring higher-order thinking skills that enable students to learn and apply the knowledge and skills defined in state standards/local curricula. Is able to model this element.

I-A-4. Well-Structured Lessons

Develops lessons with inappropriate student engagement strategies, pacing, sequence, activities, materials, resources, and/or grouping for the intended outcome or for the students in the class.

Develops lessons with only some elements of appropriate student engagement strategies, pacing, sequence, activities, materials, resources, and grouping.

Develops well-structured lessons with challenging, measurable objectives and appropriate student engagement strategies, pacing, sequence, activities, materials, resources, technologies, and grouping.

Develops well-structured and highly engaging lessons with challenging, measurable objectives and appropriate student engagement strategies, pacing, sequence, activities, materials, resources, technologies, and grouping to attend to every student’s needs. Is able to model this element.

Indicator I-B. Assessment: Uses a variety of informal and formal methods of assessments to measure student learning, growth, and understanding to develop differentiated and enhanced learning experiences and improve future instruction.

I-B. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

I-B-1. Variety of Assessment Methods

Administers only the assessments required by the school and/or measures only point-in-time student achievement.

May administer some informal and/or formal assessments to measure student learning but rarely measures student progress toward achieving state/local standards.

Designs and administers a variety of informal and formal methods and assessments, including common interim assessments, to measure each student’s learning, growth, and progress toward achieving state/local standards.

Uses an integrated, comprehensive system of informal and formal assessments, including common interim assessments, to measure student learning, growth, and progress toward achieving state/local standards. Is able to model this element.

I-B-2. Adjustment to Practice

Makes few adjustments to practice based on formal and informal assessments.

May organize and analyze some assessment results but only occasionally adjusts practice or modifies future instruction based on the findings.

Organizes and analyzes results from a variety of assessments to determine progress toward intended outcomes and uses these findings to adjust practice and identify and/or implement appropriate differentiated interventions and enhancements for students.

Organizes and analyzes results from a comprehensive system of assessments to determine progress toward intended outcomes and frequently uses these findings to adjust practice and identify and/or implement appropriate differentiated interventions and enhancements for individuals and groups of students and appropriate modifications of lessons and units. Is able to model this element.

Indicator I-C. Analysis: Analyzes data from assessments, draws conclusions, and shares them appropriately.

I-C. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

I-C-1. Analysis and Conclusions

Does not draw conclusions from student data beyond completing minimal requirements such as grading for report cards.

Draws conclusions from a limited analysis of student data to inform student grading and promotion decisions.

Individually and with colleagues, draws appropriate conclusions from a thorough analysis of a wide range of assessment data to improve student learning.

Individually and with colleagues, draws appropriate, actionable conclusions from a thorough analysis of a wide range of assessment data that improve short-and long-term instructional decisions. Is able to model this element.

I-C-2. Sharing Conclusions With Colleagues

Rarely shares with colleagues conclusions about student progress and/or rarely seeks feedback.

Only occasionally shares with colleagues conclusions about student progress and/or only occasionally seeks feedback from them about practices that will support improved student learning.

Regularly shares with appropriate colleagues (e.g., general education, special education, and English learner staff) conclusions about student progress and seeks feedback from them about instructional or assessment practices that will support improved student learning.

Establishes and implements a schedule and plan for regularly sharing with all appropriate colleagues conclusions and insights about student progress. Seeks and applies feedback from them about practices that will support improved student learning. Is able to model this element.

I-C-3. Sharing Conclusions With Students

Provides little or no feedback on student performance except through grades or report of task completion, or provides inappropriate feedback that does not support students to improve their performance.

Provides some feedback about performance beyond grades but rarely shares strategies for students to improve their performance toward objectives.

Based on assessment results, provides descriptive feedback and engages students and families in constructive conversation that focuses on how students can improve their performance.

Establishes early, constructive feedback loops with students and families that create a dialogue about performance, progress, and improvement. Is able to model this element.

Standard II: Teaching All Students. The teacher promotes the learning and growth of all students through instructional practices that establish high expectations, create a safe and effective classroom environment, and demonstrate cultural proficiency.

Indicator II-A. Instruction: Uses instructional practices that reflect high expectations regarding content and quality of effort and work; engage all students; and are personalized to accommodate diverse learning styles, needs, interests, and levels of readiness.

II-A. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

II-A-1. Quality of Effort and Work

Establishes no or low expectations around quality of work and effort and/or offers few supports for students to produce quality work or effort.

May states high expectations for quality and effort, but provides few exemplars and rubrics, limited guided practice, and/or few other supports to help students know what is expected of them; may establish inappropriately low expectations for quality and effort.

Consistently defines high expectations for the quality of student work and the perseverance and effort required to produce it; often provides exemplars, rubrics, and guided practice.

Consistently defines high expectations for quality work and effort and effectively supports students to set high expectations for each other to persevere and produce high-quality work. Is able to model this element.

II-A-2. Student Engagement

Uses instructional practices that leave most students uninvolved and/or passive participants.

Uses instructional practices that motivate and engage some students but leave others uninvolved and/or passive participants.

Consistently uses instructional practices that are likely to motivate and engage most students during the lesson.

Consistently uses instructional practices that typically motivate and engage most students both during the lesson and during independent work and home work. Is able to model this element.

II-A-3. Meeting Diverse Needs

Uses limited and/or inappropriate practices to accommodate differences.

May use some appropriate practices to accommodate differences, but fails to address an adequate range of differences.

Uses appropriate practices, including tiered instruction and scaffolds, to accommodate differences in learning styles, needs, interests, and levels of readiness, including those of students with disabilities and English learners.

Uses a varied repertoire of practices to create structured opportunities for each student to meet or exceed state standards/local curriculum and behavioral expectations. Is able to model this element.

Indicator II-B. Learning Environment: Creates and maintains a safe and collaborative learning environment that motivates students to take academic risks, challenge themselves, and claim ownership of their learning.

II-B. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

II-B-1. Safe Learning Environment

Maintains a physical environment that is unsafe or does not support student learning. Uses inappropriate or ineffective rituals, routines, and/or responses to reinforce positive behavior or respond to behaviors that interfere with students’ learning.

May create and maintain a safe physical environment but inconsistently maintains rituals, routines, and responses needed to prevent and/or stop behaviors that interfere with all students’ learning.

Uses rituals, routines, and appropriate responses that create and maintain a safe physical and intellectual environment where students take academic risks and most behaviors that interfere with learning are prevented.

Uses rituals, routines, and proactive responses that create and maintain a safe physical and intellectual environment where students take academic risks and play an active role—individually and collectively—in preventing behaviors that interfere with learning. Is able to model this element.

II-B-2. Collaborative Learning Environment

Makes little effort to teach interpersonal, group, and communication skills or facilitate student work in groups, or such attempts are ineffective.

Teaches some interpersonal, group, and communication skills and provides some opportunities for students to work in groups.

Develops students’ interpersonal, group, and communication skills and provides opportunities for students to learn in groups with diverse peers.

Teaches and reinforces interpersonal, group, and communication skills so that students seek out their peers as resources. Is able to model this practice.

II-B-3. Student Motivation

Directs all learning experiences, providing few, if any, opportunities for students to take academic risks or challenge themselves to learn.

Creates some learning experiences that guide students to identify needs, ask for support, and challenge themselves to take academic risks.

Consistently creates learning experiences that guide students to identify their strengths, interests, and needs; ask for support when appropriate; take academic risks; and challenge themselves to learn.

Consistently supports students to identify strengths, interests, and needs; ask for support; take risks; challenge themselves; set learning goals; and monitor their own progress. Models these skills for colleagues.

Indicator II-C. Cultural Proficiency: Actively creates and maintains an environment in which students’ diverse backgrounds, identities, strengths, and challenges are respected.

II-C. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

II-C-1. Respects Differences

Establishes an environment in which students demonstrate limited respect for individual differences.

Establishes an environment in which students generally demonstrate respect for individual differences

Consistently uses strategies and practices that are likely to enable students to demonstrate respect for and affirm their own and others’ differences related to background, identity, language, strengths, and challenges.

Establishes an environment in which students respect and affirm their own and others’ differences and are supported to share and explore differences and similarities related to background, identity, language, strengths, and challenges. Is able to model this practice.

II-C-2. Maintains Respectful Environment

Minimizes or ignores conflicts and/or responds in inappropriate ways.

Anticipates and responds appropriately to some conflicts or misunderstandings but ignores and/or minimizes others.

Anticipates and responds appropriately to conflicts or misunderstandings arising from differences in backgrounds, languages, and identities.

Anticipates and responds appropriately to conflicts or misunderstandings arising from differences in backgrounds, languages, and identities in ways that lead students to be able to do the same independently. Is able to model this practice.

Indicator II-D. Expectations: Plans and implements lessons that set clear and high expectations and also make knowledge accessible for all students.

II-D. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

II-D-1. Clear Expectations

Does not make specific academic and behavior expectations clear to students.

May announce and post classroom academic and behavior rules and consequences, but inconsistently or ineffectively enforces them.

Clearly communicates and consistently enforces specific standards for student work, effort, and behavior.

Clearly communicates and consistently enforces specific standards for student work, effort, and behavior so that most students are able to describe them and take ownership of meeting them. Is able to model this element.

II-D-2. High Expectations

Gives up on some students or communicates that some cannot master challenging material.

May tell students that the subject or assignment is challenging and that they need to work hard but does little to counteract student misconceptions about innate ability.

Effectively models and reinforces ways that students can master challenging material through effective effort, rather than having to depend on innate ability.

Effectively models and reinforces ways that students can consistently master challenging material through effective effort. Successfully challenges students’ misconceptions about innate ability. Is able to model this element.

II-D-3. Access to Knowledge

Rarely adapts instruction, materials, and assessments to make challenging material accessible to all students.

Occasionally adapts instruction, materials, and assessments to make challenging material accessible to all students.

Consistently adapts instruction, materials, and assessments to make challenging material accessible to all students, including English learners and students with disabilities.

Individually and with colleagues, consistently adapts instruction, materials, and assessments to make challenging material accessible to all students, including English learners and students with disabilities. Is able to model this element.

Standard III: Family and Community Engagement. The teacher promotes the learning and growth of all students through effective partnerships with families, caregivers, community members, and organizations.

Indicator III-A.     Engagement: Welcomes and encourages every family to become active participants in the classroom and school community.

III-A. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

III-A-1. Parent/Family Engagement

Does not welcome families to become participants in the classroom and school community or actively discourages their participation.

Makes limited attempts to involve families in school and/or classroom activities, meetings, and planning.

Uses a variety of strategies to support every family to participate actively and appropriately in the classroom and school community.

Successfully engages most families and sustains their active and appropriate participation in the classroom and school community. Is able to model this element.

Indicator III-B.     Collaboration: Collaborates with families to create and implement strategies for supporting student learning and development both at home and at school.

III-B. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

III-B-1. Learning Expectations

Does not inform parents about learning or behavior expectations.

Sends home only a list of classroom rules and the learning outline or syllabus for the year.

Consistently provides parents with clear, user-friendly expectations for student learning and behavior.

Successfully conveys to most parents student learning and behavior expectations. Is able to model this element.

III-B-2. Curriculum Support

Rarely, if ever, communicates with parents on ways to support children at home or at school.

Sends home occasional suggestions on how parents can support children at home or at school.

Regularly updates parents on curriculum throughout the year and suggests strategies for supporting learning at school and home, including appropriate adaptation for students with disabilities or limited English proficiency.

Successfully prompts most families to use one or more of the strategies suggested for supporting learning at school and home and seeks out evidence of their impact. Is able to model this element.

Indicator III-C.     Communication: Engages in regular, two-way, and culturally proficient communication with families about student learning and performance.

III-C. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

III-C-1. Two-Way Communication

Rarely communicates with families except through report cards; rarely solicits or responds promptly and carefully to communications from families.

Relies primarily on newsletters and other one-way media and usually responds promptly to communications from families.

Regularly uses two-way communication with families about student performance and learning and responds promptly and carefully to communications from families.

Regularly uses a two-way system that supports frequent, proactive, and personalized communication with families about student performance and learning. Is able to model this element.

III-C-2. Culturally Proficient Communication

Makes few attempts to respond to different family cultural norms and/or responds inappropriately or disrespectfully.

May communicate respectfully and make efforts to take into account different families’ home language, culture, and values, but does so inconsistently or does not demonstrate understanding and sensitivity to the differences.

Always communicates respectfully with families and demonstrates understanding of and sensitivity to different families’ home language, culture, and values.

Always communicates respectfully with families and demonstrates understanding and appreciation of different families’ home language, culture, and values. Is able to model this element.

Standard IV: Professional Culture. The teacher promotes the learning and growth of all students through ethical, culturally proficient, skilled, and collaborative practice.

Indicator IV-A.     Reflection: Demonstrates the capacity to reflect on and improve the educator’s own practice, using informal means as well as meetings with teams and work groups to gather information, analyze data, examine issues, set meaningful goals, and develop new approaches in order to improve teaching and learning.

IV-A. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-A-1. Reflective Practice

Demonstrates limited reflection on practice and/or use of insights gained to improve practice.

May reflect on the effectiveness of lessons/ units and interactions with students but not with col-leagues and/or rarely uses insights to improve practice.

Regularly reflects on the effectiveness of lessons, units, and interactions with students, both individually and with colleagues, and uses insights gained to improve practice and student learning.

Regularly reflects on the effectiveness of lessons, units, and interactions with students, both individually and with colleagues; and uses and shares with colleagues, insights gained to improve practice and student learning. Is able to model this element.

IV-A-2. Goal Setting

Generally, participates passively in the goal-setting process and/or proposes goals that are vague or easy to reach.

Proposes goals that are sometimes vague or easy to achieve and/or bases goals on a limited self-assessment and analysis of student learning data.

Proposes challenging, measurable professional practice, team, and student learning goals that are based on thorough self-assessment and analysis of student learning data.

Individually and with colleagues builds capacity to propose and monitor challenging, measurable goals based on thorough self-assessment and analysis of student learning data. Is able to model this element.

Indicator IV-B.      Professional Growth: Actively pursues professional development and learning opportunities to improve quality of practice or build the expertise and experience to assume different instructional and leadership roles.

IV-B. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-B-1. Professional Learning and Growth

Participates in few, if any, professional development and learning opportunities to improve practice and/or applies little new learning to practice.

Participates only in required professional development activities and/or inconsistently or inappropriately applies new learning to improve practice.

Consistently seeks out and applies, when appropriate, ideas for improving practice from supervisors, colleagues, professional development activities, and other resources to gain expertise and/or assume different instruction and leadership responsibilities.

Consistently seeks out professional development and learning opportunities that improve practice and build expertise of self and other educators in instruction and leadership. Is able to model this element.

Indicator IV-C.     Collaboration: Collaborates effectively with colleagues on a wide range of tasks.

IV-C. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-C-1. Professional Collaboration

Rarely and/or ineffectively collaborates with colleagues; conversations often lack focus on improving student learning.

Does not consistently collaborate with colleagues in ways that support productive team effort.

Consistently and effectively collaborates with colleagues in such work as developing standards-based units, examining student work, analyzing student performance, and planning appropriate intervention.

Supports colleagues to collaborate in areas such as developing standards-based units, examining student work, analyzing student performance, and planning appropriate intervention. Is able to model this element.

Indicator IV-D.     Decision-Making: Becomes involved in schoolwide decision making, and takes an active role in school improvement planning.

IV-D. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-D-1. Decision-Making

Participates in planning and decision making at the school, department, and/or grade level only when asked and rarely contributes relevant ideas or expertise.

May participate in planning and decision making at the school, department, and/or grade level but rarely contributes relevant ideas or expertise.

Consistently contributes relevant ideas and expertise to planning and decision making at the school, department, and/or grade level.

I In planning and decision-making at the school, department, and/or grade level, consistently contributes ideas and expertise that are critical to school improvement efforts. Is able to model this element.

Indicator IV-E.      Shared Responsibility: Shares responsibility for the performance of all students within the school.

IV-E. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-E-1. Shared Responsibility

Rarely reinforces schoolwide behavior and learning expectations for all students and/or makes a limited contribution to their learning by rarely sharing responsibility for meeting their needs.

Within and beyond the classroom, inconsistently reinforces school-wide behavior and learning expectations for all students, and/or makes a limited contribution to their learning by inconsistently sharing responsibility for meeting their needs.

Within and beyond the classroom, consistently reinforces schoolwide behavior and learning expectations for all students, and contributes to their learning by sharing responsibility for meeting their needs.

Individually and with colleagues-develops strategies and actions that contribute to the learning and productive behavior of all students at the school. Is able to model this element.

Indicator IV-F.      Professional Responsibilities: Is ethical and reliable, and meets routine responsibilities consistently.

IV-F. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

IV-F-1. Judgment

Demonstrates poor judgment and/or discloses confidential student information inappropriately.

Sometimes demonstrates questionable judgment and/or inadvertently shares confidential information.

Demonstrates sound judgment reflecting integrity, honesty, fairness, and trustworthiness and protects student confidentiality appropriately.

Demonstrates sound judgment and acts appropriately to protect student confidentiality, rights and safety. Is able to model this element.

IV-F-2. Reliability & Responsibility

Frequently misses or is late to assignments, makes errors in records, and/or misses paperwork deadlines; frequently late or absent.

Occasionally misses or is late to assignments, completes work late, and/or makes errors in records.

Consistently fulfills professional responsibilities; is consistently punctual and reliable with paperwork, duties, and assignments; and is rarely late or absent from school.

Consistently fulfills all professional responsibilities to high standards. Is able to model this element.

Standard V: Instructional Leadership. The education leader promotes the learning and growth of all students and the success of all staff by cultivating a shared vision that makes powerful teaching and learning the central focus of schooling.

Indicator V-A. Curriculum: Ensures that all teachers design effective and rigorous standards-based units of instruction consisting of well-structured lessons with measurable outcomes.

V-A. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

V-A-1. Standards-Based Unit Design

Does not set the expectation that educators plan standards-based units of instruction, provide adequate resources or support for this activity, and/or monitor or assess progress.

Gives educators resources on how to use a backward design approach to planning standards-based units and checks that teachers engage in instructional planning. Sometimes monitors and assesses progress and provides feedback.

Provides support and assistance for educators and teams to use a backward design approach to plan standards-based units with measurable outcomes and challenging tasks requiring higher-order thinking. Frequently monitors and assesses progress, providing feedback as necessary.

Empowers staff to create with a backward design approach rigorous standards-based units of instruction that are aligned across grade levels and content areas. Continually monitors and assesses progress, provides feedback, and connects educators to additional supports as needed. Is able to model this element.

Indicator V-A. Curriculum: Ensures that all teachers design effective and rigorous standards-based units of instruction consisting of well-structured lessons with measurable outcomes.

V-A. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

V-A-2. Lesson Development Support

Does not state expectations for the development of well-structured lessons, provide support to educators, and/or discriminate between strong and weak lesson-planning practices.

Provides limited training to educators on how to develop well-structured lessons and/or does not consistently address patterns of weak lesson development practices.

Supports educators to develop well-structured lessons with challenging, measurable objectives and appropriate student engagement strategies, pacing, sequence, activities, materials, technologies, and grouping.

Supports educators to collaborate on developing a series of interconnected, well-structured lessons with challenging objectives and appropriate student engagement strategies, pacing, sequence, materials, and grouping and identifies specific exemplars and resources in each area. Is able to model this element.

Indicator V-B. Instruction: Ensures that instructional practices in all settings reflect high expectations regarding content and quality of effort and work, engage all students, and are personalized to accommodate diverse learning styles, needs, interests, and levels of readiness.

V-B. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

V-B-1. Instructional Practices

Does not look for evidence of and/or cannot accurately identify more than a few effective teaching strategies and practices.

While observing practice and reviewing unit plans, occasionally looks for evidence of or accurately identifies appropriate teaching strategies and practices.

While observing practice and reviewing unit plans, looks for and identifies a variety of effective teaching strategies and practices.

Ensures, through observation and review of unit plans, that teachers know and employ effective teaching strategies and practices while teaching their content. Is able to model this element.

V-B-2. Quality of Effort and Work

Does not set high expectations for the quality of content, student effort, and/or student work school wide and department wide, or expectations are inappropriate.

May set high expectations for the quality of content, student effort, and student work school wide and department wide, but allows expectations to be inconsistently applied across the school.

Sets and models high expectations for the quality of content, student effort, and student work school wide and department wide, and supports educators to uphold these expectations consistently.

Sets and models high expectations for the quality of content, student effort, and student work school wide and department wide, and empowers educators and students to uphold these expectations consistently. Is able to model this element.

V-B-3. Diverse Learners’ Needs

Does not look for evidence of and/or cannot accurately identify more than a few effective teaching strategies and practices.

While observing practice and reviewing unit plans, occasionally looks for evidence of or accurately identifies teaching strategies and practices that are appropriate for diverse learners.

While observing practice and reviewing unit plans, looks for and identifies a variety of teaching strategies and practices that are effective with diverse learners.

Ensures, through observation and review of unit plans, that teachers know and employ teaching strategies and practices that are effective with diverse learners while teaching their content. Is able to model this element.

Indicator V-C. Assessment: Ensures that all teachers use a variety of formal and informal methods and assessments to measure student learning, growth, and understanding and make necessary adjustments to their practice when students are not learning.

V-C. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

V-C-1. Variety of Assessments

Does not communicate or monitor a strategy for assessments, leaving it up to educators to design and implement their own assessments.

Provides educators with some formal assessment options and suggests that they coordinate their assessment practices within their teams and include a variety of assessments but does not monitor this practice.

Supports educator teams to use a variety of formal and informal methods and assessments, including common interim assessments that are aligned across grade levels and subject areas.

Leads educator teams to develop and implement a comprehensive assessment strategy that includes ongoing informal assessment and common interim assessments that are aligned across grade levels and subject areas. Is able to model this element.

V-C-2. Adjustment to Practice

Does not encourage or facilitate teams to review assessment data.

Suggests that teams meet to review data and plan for adjustments and interventions but inconsistently monitors this practice.

Provides planning time and effective support for teams to review assessment data and identify appropriate interventions and adjustments to practice. Monitors educators’ efforts and successes in this area.

Plans, facilitates, and supports team review meetings after each round of assessments. Monitors teams’ plans, adjustments to instruction, and outcomes and shares lessons learned with others. Is able to model this element.

Indicator V-D. Evaluation: Provides effective and timely supervision and evaluation in alignment with state regulations and contract provisions, including:

1. Ensures that educators pursue meaningful, actionable, and measurable professional practice and student learning goals.

2. Makes frequent unannounced visits to classrooms and gives targeted and constructive feedback to teachers.

3. Exercises sound judgment in assigning ratings for performance and impact on student learning.

4. Reviews alignment between judgment about practice and data about student learning, growth, or achievement when evaluating and rating educators and understands that the supervisor has the responsibility to confirm the rating in cases in which a discrepancy exists.

V-D. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

V-D-1. Educator Goals

Does not support educators to develop professional practice and/or student learning goals, review the goals for quality, and/or support educators in attaining goals.

Supports educators and educator teams to develop professional practice and student learning goals but does not consistently review them for quality and/or monitor progress.

Supports educators and educator teams to develop and attain meaningful, actionable, and measurable professional practice and student learning goals.

Supports educators and educator teams to develop and attain meaningful, actionable, and measurable professional practice and student learning goals and models this process through the leader’s own evaluation process and goals. Is able to model this element.

V-D-2. Observations and Feedback

Observes educators only in formal observation visits and/or does not provide honest feedback to educators who are not performing proficiently.

Makes infrequent unannounced visits to classrooms, rarely provides feedback that is specific and constructive, and/or critiques struggling educators without providing support to improve their performance.

Typically makes at least two unannounced visits to classrooms every day and provides targeted constructive feedback to all educators. Acknowledges effective practice and provides redirection and support for those whose practice is less than Proficient.

Makes multiple unannounced visits to classrooms every day and provides targeted constructive feedback within 48 hours. Engages with all educators in conversations about improvement, celebrates effective practice, and provides targeted support to educators whose practice is less than Proficient. Is able to model this element.

V-D-3. Ratings

Assigns ratings for performance, goal attainment, and impact on student learning without collecting and analyzing sufficient and/or appropriate data or does not assign ratings for some educators.

Assigns ratings for performance, goal attainment, and impact on student learning in a way that is not consistently transparent to educators.

Exercises sound and reliable judgment in assigning ratings for performance, goal attainment, and impact on student learning and ensures that educators understand why they received their ratings.

Exercises sound and reliable judgment in assigning ratings for performance, goal attainment, and impact on student learning. Ensures that educators understand in detail why they received their ratings and provides effective support to colleagues around this practice Is able to model this element.

V-D-4. Alignment Review

Does not review alignment between judgment about practice and data about student learning when evaluating and rating educators.

Occasionally reviews alignment between judgment about practice and student learning data.

Consistently reviews alignment between judgment about practice and student learning data and makes informed decisions about educator support and evaluation based upon this review.

Studies alignment between judgment about practice and data about student learning when evaluating and rating educators and provides effective support to colleagues around this practice. Is able to model this element.

Indicator V-E. Data-Informed Decision Making: Uses multiple sources of evidence related to student learning, including state, district, school and department assessment results and growth data, to inform school and district goals and improve organizational performance, educator effectiveness, and student learning.

V-E. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

V-E-1. Knowledge and Use of Data

Relies on few data sources that do not represent the full picture of school and department performance and/or does not analyze the data accurately.

May identify multiple sources of student learning data but these data do not provide multiple perspectives on performance and/or analysis of the data is sometimes inaccurate.

Identifies a range of appropriate data sources and effectively analyzes the data for decision-making purposes.

Leads educator teams to identify a range of appropriate data sources, including non-traditional information that offers a unique perspective on school performance, and models effective data analysis for staff. Is able to model this element.

V-E-2. School and District Goals

Gathers limited information on the school’s and department’s strengths and weaknesses and/or does not use these data to inform school plans or actions.

Assesses the school’s and department’s strengths and weaknesses using data that are not carefully analyzed and/or writes an unfocused strategic plan.

Uses data to accurately assess the school’s and department’s strengths and areas for improvement to inform the creation of focused, measurable department, school, and district goals.

Involves stakeholders in a comprehensive diagnosis of the school’s and department’s strengths and weaknesses using appropriate data and leads a collaborative process to develop a focused, results-oriented strategic plan with annual goals. Is able to model this element.

V-E-3. Improvement of Performance, Effectiveness, and Learning

Does not share assessment data with faculty, use data to make adjustments to school and department plans, and/or model appropriate data analysis strategies.

Shares limited data with faculty to identify student and/or educator subgroups that need support; provides limited assistance to educator teams in using data to improve performance.

Uses multiple data sources to evaluate educator and school and department performance. Provides educator teams with disaggregated assessment data and assists faculty in identifying students who need additional support.

Leads teams to disaggregate data and identify individuals or groups of students who need support. Empowers educators to use a range of data sources to pinpoint areas for their own and school wide and department wide improvement. Is able to model this element.

Indicator V-F. Professional Culture. Promotes success for all students by nurturing and sustaining a school culture of reflective practice, high expectations, and continuous learning for staff.

V-F. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

V-F-1. Recruitment and Hiring Strategies

Does not successfully lead the recruitment and hiring process.

Leads the recruitment and hiring process but does not consistently identify effective educators.

Leads the school’s recruitment and hiring process and, through it, consistently identifies effective educators who share the school’s mission.

Consistently identifies effective educators who share the school’s mission. Empowers faculty members to share in a structured, consistent interview process. Is able to model this element.

V-F-2. Two-Way Communication

Does not set clear expectations for or provide support to educator to communicate with families. School and classroom communication regarding student learning and performance primarily occurs through report cards.

May set expectations for and provide limited support to educators to communicate with families but does not stress the importance of two-way communication channels. School and classroom communication regarding student learning and performance primarily occurs through newsletters and other one-way media.

Sets clear expectations for and provides support to educators to communicate regularly with families using two-way communication channels, including careful and prompt response to communications from families. Supports educators to maximize the number of face-to-face family/teacher interactions.

Sets clear expectations for and provides differentiated support to ensure that all educators design and implement frequent personalized communications, respond carefully and promptly to communications from families, and solicit feedback from families that informs improvement to communication plans. Is able to model this element.

V-F-3. Meetings

Leads meetings that lack clear purpose and/or are primarily used for one-way informational updates.

Leads meetings that include both one-way informational updates and participatory activities focused on matters of consequence.

Plans and leads well-run and engaging meetings that have clear purpose, focus on matters of consequence, and engage participants in a thoughtful and productive series of conversations and deliberations about important school matters.

Plans and facilitates staff-led, engaging meetings in which small groups of educators learn together and create solutions to instructional issues. Is able to model this element.

V-F-4. Response to Disagreement

Does not respond to disagreement or dissent and/or does not use appropriate, respectful, non-confrontational approaches.

May respond respectfully to disagreement and dissent, but responds inconsistently and does not always employ a non-confrontational approach

Employs a non-confrontational approach for responding respectfully and appropriately to disagreement and dissent, using both as opportunities for learning

Models a variety of strategies for responding respectfully and effectively to disagreement and dissent, using both as opportunities for learning. Is able to model this element.

Specialized Instructional Support Personnel Department Chair Rubric– Appendix H

Standard I: Curriculum, Planning, and Assessment. promotes the learning and growth of all students by providing high-quality and coherent instruction, designing and administering authentic and meaningful student assessments, analyzing student performance and growth data, using this data to improve instruction, providing students with constructive feedback on an ongoing basis, and continuously refining learning objectives.

Indicator I-A. Curriculum and Planning: Has strong knowledge specific to subject matter and/or professional responsibility, has a good grasp of child development and how students learn, and designs effective and rigorous plans for support consisting of well-structured lessons with measurable outcomes.

I-A. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

I-A-1. Professional Knowledge

Demonstrates limited professional knowledge; relies heavily on outdated practices as opposed to current practices supported by research. Rarely engages students in academic, behavioral, and social/emotional learning experiences through the use of educational and/or clinical practices.

Demonstrates factual knowledge of the professional content and delivery and sometimes applies it to engage students in academic, behavioral, and social/emotional learning experiences through the use of educational and/or clinical practices.

Demonstrates sound knowledge and understanding of professional content and delivery by consistently engaging students in academic, behavioral, and social/emotional learning experiences through the use of educational and/or clinical practices that enable students to acquire knowledge and skills.

Demonstrates mastery of professional content and its delivery by engaging all students in academic, behavioral, and social/emotional learning experiences, through the use of educational and/or clinical practices, that enable students to synthesize knowledge and skills. Is able to model this element.

I-A-2. Child and Adolescent Development

Demonstrates little or no knowledge of child and adolescent development; typically develops one learning experience, and/or type of support or assistance for all students that does not adequately address intended outcomes.

Demonstrates general knowledge of child and adolescent development but does not apply this knowledge when providing differentiated learning experiences, support, and/or assistance that would enable all students—as opposed to just some—to move toward meeting intended outcomes.

Demonstrates knowledge of students’ developmental levels and the different ways these students learn or behave by providing differentiated learning experiences, support, and/or assistance that enable all students to progress toward meeting intended outcomes.

Demonstrates expert knowledge of the developmental levels of individual students and students in the grade or subject more generally and uses this knowledge to differentiate and expand learning experiences, supports, and/or types of assistance, enabling all students to make significant progress toward meeting stated outcomes. Is able to model this element.

1-A-3 Plan Development11

Develops or contributes to the development of plans that are not timely and/or not tailored to the needs of individual students; or, plans do not include appropriate supports or measurable outcomes that would enable students to meet the goals and objectives of the plan.

Develops or contributes to the timely development of plans that respond to some but not all relevant individual student needs, and/or plans that lack sufficient measurable outcomes or supports that enable students to meet all goals and objectives of the plan.

Develops or contributes to the timely development of well-structured plans with measurable outcomes that respond to all relevant individual student needs, and include supports that enable students to meet the goals or objectives of the plan.

Develops or contributes to the timely development of comprehensive, well-structured plans with measurable outcomes that respond to all relevant individual student needs, are coordinated with other plans relevant to those students, and include supports that enable students to meet all goals or objectives of the plan. Is able to model this element.

I-A-4. Well-Structured Lessons

Develops lessons (which may include individual and group activities or sessions) with inappropriate student engagement strategies, pacing, sequence, activities, materials, resources, and/or grouping.

Develops lessons (which may include individual and group activities or sessions) with only some elements of appropriate student engagement strategies, pacing, sequence, activities, materials, resources, and grouping.

Develops well-structured lessons (which may include individual and group activities or sessions) with challenging, measurable objectives and appropriate student engagement strategies, pacing, sequence, activities, materials, resources, technologies, and grouping.

Develops well-structured and highly engaging lessons (which may include individual and group activities and sessions) with challenging, measurable objectives and appropriate student engagement strategies, pacing, sequence, activities, materials, resources, technologies, and grouping to attend to every student’s needs. Is able to model this element.

Indicator I-B. Assessment: Uses a variety of informal and formal methods of assessments to measure student learning, growth, and understanding to develop differentiated and enhanced learning experiences and improve future instruction.

I-B. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

I-B-1. Variety of Assessment Methods

Administers assessments and/or collects only the data required by the school and/or measures only point-in-time student achievement or development.

May design and administer assessments and/or collect some data to measure student learning, growth, or development, but uses a limited range of methods.

Designs and administers assessments and/or collects data to measure student learning, growth, and/or development through a variety of methods, including informal and formal assessments and common interim assessments where applicable.

Uses an integrated, comprehensive assessment system, including informal and formal assessment methods and common interim assessments where applicable, to measure student learning, growth, and development. Is able to model this element.

I-B-2. Adjustment to Practice

Makes few adjustments to practice by identifying and/or implementing appropriate differentiated interventions, supports, and programs based on formal and informal assessments.

May organize and analyze some assessment results but only occasionally adjusts practice and identifies and/or implements appropriate differentiated interventions, supports, and programs for students.

Organizes and analyzes results from a variety of assessments to determine progress toward intended outcomes and uses these findings to adjust practice and identify and/or implement appropriate differentiated interventions, supports, and programs for students.

Organizes and analyzes results from a comprehensive system of assessments to determine progress toward intended outcomes and frequently uses these findings to adjust practice and identify and/or implement appropriate differentiated interventions, supports, or programs for individuals and groups of students and appropriate modifications of plans. Is able to model this element.

Indicator I-C. Analysis: Analyzes data from assessments, draws conclusions, and shares them appropriately.

I-C. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

I-C-1. Analysis and Conclusions

Does not analyze data and/or draw conclusions from data beyond completing minimal requirements.

Draws conclusions from a limited analysis of data to inform student learning, growth, and development.

Individually and with colleagues, draws appropriate conclusions about programs, plans, and practices from a thorough analysis of a wide range of data to improve student learning, growth, and development.

Individually and with colleagues, draws appropriate, actionable conclusions about programs, plans, and practices from a thorough analysis of a wide range of data that improve short-and long-term planning decisions. Is able to model this element.

I-C-2. Sharing Conclusions With Colleagues

Rarely shares with colleagues conclusions about student progress and/or rarely seeks feedback from them about practices that will support improved student learning and/or development.

Only occasionally shares with colleagues conclusions about student progress and/or seeks feedback from them about practices that will support improved student learning and/or development.

Regularly shares with appropriate colleagues (e.g., classroom teachers, administrators, and professional support personnel) conclusions about student progress and seeks feedback from them about practices that will support improved student learning and/or development.

Establishes and implements a schedule and plan for regularly sharing with all appropriate colleagues (e.g., classroom teachers, administrators, and professional support personnel) conclusions and insights about student progress. Seeks and applies feedback from them about practices that will support improved student learning and/or development. Is able to model this element.

I-C-3. Sharing Conclusions With Students and Families

Provides little or no feedback on student growth or progress except through minimally required reporting or provides inappropriate feedback that does not support students to grow and improve.

Provides some feedback about student growth or progress beyond required reports but rarely shares strategies for students to grow and improve.

Based on assessment results and/or other data, provides descriptive feedback and engages students and families in constructive conversation that focuses on student growth and improvement.

Establishes early, constructive feedback loops with students and families that create a dialogue about student growth, progress, and improvement. Is able to model this element.

Standard II: Teaching All Students. Promotes the learning and growth of all students through instructional practices that establish high expectations, create a safe and effective classroom environment, and demonstrate cultural proficiency.

Indicator II-A. Instruction: Uses instructional and clinical practices that reflect high expectations regarding content and quality of effort and work; engage all students; and are personalized to accommodate diverse learning styles, needs, interests, and levels of readiness.

II-A. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

II-A-1. Quality of Effort and Work

Establishes no or low expectations for student work and behavior and/or offers few supports to help students know what is expected of them.

May state high expectations for student work and behavior, but provides few exemplars and rubrics, or limited guided practice, and/or few other supports to help students know what is expected of them.

Consistently defines high expectations for student work and behavior, and the perseverance and effort required to produce it; often provides exemplars, rubrics, or guided practice, and/or models appropriate behaviors.

Consistently defines high expectations for student work and behavior and effectively supports students to set high expectations for each other to persevere and produce high-quality work. Is able to model this element.

II-A-2. Student Engagement

Uses instructional and/or clinical practices that leave most students uninvolved and/or passive.

Uses instructional and/or clinical practices that motivate and engage some students but leave others uninvolved and/or passive.

Consistently uses instructional and clinical practices that are likely to motivate and engage most students during the lesson, activity, or session.

Consistently uses instructional and clinical practices that typically motivate and engage most students during the lesson, activity, or session, and during independent work. Is able to model this element.

II-A-3. Meeting Diverse Needs

Uses limited and/or inappropriate practices and/or supports to accommodate differences.

May use some appropriate practices and/or supports to accommodate differences, but fails to address an adequate range of differences.

Uses appropriate practices, including tiered instruction, scaffolds, and other supports, to accommodate differences in learning styles, needs, interests, and levels of readiness, including those of students with disabilities and English learners.

Uses a varied repertoire of practices and/or supports to create structured opportunities for each student to meet or exceed expectations for growth and development. Is able to model this element.

Indicator II-B. Learning Environment: Creates and maintains a safe and collaborative learning environment that motivates students to take academic risks, challenge themselves, and claim ownership of their learning.

II-B. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

II-B-1. Safe Learning Environment

Maintains a physical environment that is unsafe or does not support student learning. Uses inappropriate or ineffective rituals, routines, and/or responses to reinforce positive behavior or respond to behaviors that interfere with students’ learning.

May create and maintain a safe physical environment but inconsistently maintains rituals, routines, and responses needed to prevent and/or stop behaviors that interfere with all students’ learning.

Uses rituals, routines, and appropriate responses that create and maintain a safe physical and intellectual environment where students take academic risks and most behaviors that interfere with learning are prevented.

Uses rituals, routines, and proactive responses that create and maintain a safe physical and intellectual environment where students take academic risks and play an active role— individually and collectively—in preventing behaviors that interfere with learning. Is able to model this element.

II-B-2. Collaborative Learning Environment

Makes little effort to teach interpersonal, group, and communication skills or facilitate student work in groups, or such attempts are ineffective.

Teaches some interpersonal, group, and communication skills and provides some opportunities for students to work in groups.

Develops students’ interpersonal, group, and communication skills and provides opportunities for students to learn in groups with diverse peers.

Teaches and reinforces interpersonal, group, and communication skills so that students seek out their peers as resources. Is able to model this practice.

II-B-2. Student Motivation

Directs all learning experiences, providing few, if any, opportunities for students to take risks or challenge themselves.

Creates some learning experiences that guide students to identify needs, ask for support, and challenge themselves to take risks.

Consistently creates learning experiences that guide students to identify their strengths, interests, and needs; ask for support when appropriate; take risks; and challenge themselves to succeed.

Consistently supports students to identify their strengths, interests, and needs; ask for support; take risks; challenge themselves; set learning goals; and monitor their own progress. Is able to model this element.

Indicator II-C. Cultural Proficiency: Actively creates and maintains an environment in which students’ diverse backgrounds, identities, strengths, and challenges are respected.

II-C. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

II-C-1. Respects Differences

Establishes an environment in which students demonstrate limited respect for individual differences.

Establishes an environment in which students generally demonstrate respect for individual differences.

Consistently uses strategies and practices that are likely to enable students to demonstrate respect for and affirm their own and others’ differences related to background, identity, language, strengths, and challenges.

Establishes an environment in which students respect and affirm their own and others’ differences and are supported to share and explore differences and similarities related to background, identity, language, strengths, and challenges. Is able to model this element.

II-C-2. Maintains Respectful Environment

Minimizes or ignores conflicts and/or responds in inappropriate ways.

Anticipates and responds appropriately to some conflicts or misunderstandings but ignores and/or minimizes others.

Anticipates and responds appropriately to conflicts or misunderstandings arising from differences in backgrounds, languages, and identities.

Anticipates and responds appropriately to conflicts or misunderstandings arising from differences in backgrounds, languages, and identities in ways that lead students to be able to do the same independently. Is able to model this element.

Indicator II-D. Expectations: Plans and implements lessons and/or supports that set clear and high expectations and also make knowledge, information, and/or supports accessible for all students.

II-D. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

II-D-1. Clear Expectations

Does not make specific standards for student work, effort, interactions, and behavior clear to students.

May communicate specific standards for student work, effort, interactions, and behavior, but inconsistently or ineffectively enforces them.

Clearly communicates and consistently enforces specific standards for student work, effort, and behavior.

Clearly communicates and consistently enforces specific standards for student work, effort, interactions, and behavior so that most students are able to describe them and take ownership of meeting them. Is able to model this element.

II-D-2. High Expectations

Gives up on some students or communicates that some cannot accomplish challenging goals. .

May tell students that a goal is challenging and that they need to work hard but does not model ways students can accomplish the goal through effective effort. .

Effectively models and reinforces ways that students can set and accomplish challenging goals through effective effort, rather than having to depend on innate ability.

Effectively models and reinforces ways that students can consistently accomplish challenging goals through effective effort. Successfully challenges students’ misconceptions about innate ability. Is able to model this element.

II-D-3. Access to Knowledge

Rarely adapts instruction, services, plans, communication, and/or assessments to make curriculum/supports accessible to all students for whom the educator has responsibility.

Occasionally adapts instruction, services, plans, communication, and/or assessments to make curriculum/supports accessible to all students for whom the educator has responsibility.

Consistently adapts instruction, services, plans, communication, and/or assessments to make cur-riculum/ supports accessible to all students for whom the educator has responsibility, including English learners and students with disabilities.

Individually and with colleagues, consistently adapts instruction, services, plans, communication, and/or assessments to make curriculum/supports accessible to all students for whom the educator has responsibility, including English learners and students with disabilities. Is able to model this element.

Standard III: Family and Community Engagement. Promotes the learning and growth of all students through effective partnerships with families, caregivers, community members, and organizations.

Indicator III-A. Engagement: Welcomes and encourages every family to become active participants in the classroom and school community.

III-A. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

III-A-1. Parent/Family Engagement

Does not welcome families to become participants in the classroom and school community or actively discourages their participation.

Makes limited attempts to involve families in school and/or classroom activities, meetings, and planning.

Uses a variety of strategies to support families to participate actively and appropriately in the classroom and school community.

Successfully engages most families and sustains their active and appropriate participation in the classroom and school community. Is able to model this element.

Indicator III-B. Collaboration: Collaborates with families to create and implement strategies for supporting student learning and development both at home and at school.

III-B. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

III-B-1. Learning Expectations

Does not inform parents about learning, behavior, and/or wellness expectations.

Sends home only a list of rules/expectations and an outline of the student learning, behavior, or wellness plan for the year.

Consistently provides parents with clear, user-friendly expectations for student learning, behavior, and/or wellness.

Successfully conveys to most parents clear, user-friendly student learning, behavior, and wellness expectations. Is able to model this element.

III-B-2. Student Support

Rarely, if ever, communicates with parents on ways to support learning and development at home or at school.

Sends home occasional suggestions on how parents can support learning and development at home or at school.

Regularly communicates with parents to create, share, and/or identify strategies for supporting learning and development at school and home.

Regularly communicates with parents to share and/or identify strategies for supporting learning and development at school and home, successfully encourages most families to use at least one of these strategies, and seeks out evidence of their impact. Is able to model this element.

Indicator III-C. Communication: Engages in regular, two-way, and culturally proficient communication with families about student learning, behavior and wellness.

III-C. Elements

Unsatisfactory

Needs Improvement

Proficient

Exemplary

III-C-1. Two-Way Communication

Rarely communicates with families except through required reports; rarely solicits or responds promptly to communications from families.

Relies primarily on sharing general information and announcements with families through one-way media and usually responds promptly to communications from families.

Regularly uses two-way communication with families about student learning, behavior, and wellness; responds promptly and carefully to communications from families.

Regularly uses a two-way system that supports frequent, proactive, and personalized communication with families